Question about 2000 Chevrolet Suburban

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Vehicle not getting warm

Heater lines feeding into core are hot, blower will run, no heat coming out of vents

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Cool air coming from vents


The two lines are 1. the hot water coming from your radiator and 2 the return water coming out of the heater core going back to the radiator. If the hose is hot which it should be and the return is less hot which it should be, it sounds like you have an issue with the temp controls part inside the vehicle. It is electronic I think so that is more than likely your problem.

Mar 03, 2016 | 1999 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

Can somebody please tell me where and how to be warm in my 1987 Chevy pace arrow?


WTH is a pace arrow? Aw, never mind, the essence of staying warm is to understand the heating and blowing circuits in the vehicle. It's pretty simple, really. The heater runs off the coolant circulation system in the vehicle. A separate system circulates some of the engine's hot coolant back into the coolant system by passing a portion through the heater case below the dash through a device called a "heater core" and this core is the essence of the heat generating system in the vehicle's interior. When air from the blower motor is passed over this heater core, and then passed into the heater vents, you get warm air in the vehicle.

Nov 13, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Chrysler sebring no heat


If the heater core lines are hot but the core isn't, the problem may be a clogged core.

Dec 18, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Heater is not blowing hot air


How old is the coolant in your car? If you haven't changed the coolant in a couple of years, you may have sediment build-up in the heater core that is restricting full circulation in the core and preventing good heat output. Feel both hoses at the firewall that go to the heater core. Are both equally hot when the engine is warmed up and heater controls on high? If only one is hot, and the other lukewarm, the core is partially plugged. Pull off both hoses there and run a garden hose at low volume backward through the core. If not sure what is backward flow just run the garden hose through both openings and see if you can remove any sediment or blockage.
If both hoses are hot, the core may be circulating fine, and the problem may be in the heater case's doors not opening fully- I think that would be the temperature blend door. When heater controls on full heat, the door should be fully open to let blower air pass across and through the heater core to pick up heat and pass on through to vents.

Dec 20, 2012 | 2002 Kia Sedona

1 Answer

Rear vents blow out hot air when a/c is on


Keep this principle in mind: Heat, flows INTO cold... When you hold an ice cube in your hand, your hand gets cold because the heat from your hand is flowing INTO the clod ice cube, NOT because the cold is flowing into your hand.

On this particular vehicle (like many modern vehicles), hot water from the engine flows through the heater core at all times, even when you have the A/C on or when you have nothing (A/C, heat or vent) on. The system uses a door that closes down over the air opening to the heater core to keep you from feeling warm/hot air when it is not desired. The reason(s) you feel that the vent air is warm even when the outside temperature is somewhat cool is/could be caused by the following:

First, although as mentioned above, the heater core is restricted from receiving air when you are not commanding heat by the control panel, the heater core ultimately ends up as warm as the engine temperature. This is generally somewhere around 200 degrees F. Because all the air coming out of your vent(s) must pass over the door that restricts air over the heater core, and because the heater core gets so hot, some of that heat is picked up by air passing over the hot door even though it is closed.

Second, the door that restricts airflow from passing over the heater core has a seal around it. After a period of time this rubber (or usually felt) seal deteriorates, allowing some air to actually pass over the heater core. Since the core is hot all the time, some of the air gets heat loaded, producing warmed air.

Third, the door is operated by (in the case of your vehicle) an electric motor which responds gradually/proportionately to the setting you select on the temperature dial. If the motor gets out of calibration (can happen from time to time), if the control head has a 'glitch' and sends an incorrect signal (chronically, usually), or if the electric motor (called an actuator and contains its own little electronic 'brain') becomes faulty, the door may not be closing completely. This symptom can also be caused by a problem with the door itself, where the door gets stuck due to warping of the plastic case, a foreign object preventing it from closing (usually a pen or toy dropped into a vent or defrost opening), or a broken or cracked door hinge.

Last, the vent intake opening, where the 'fresh' air comes into the car on the 'vent' setting, is located just below the windshield on the passenger side. This opening receives its air directly off of the sun-baked, engine-heated hood and because of this the air is never as cool as outside air even on a cooler night.

I hope this answers your question. Many domestic vehicle manufacturers have begun installing heater control valves on their vehicles once again as they nearly all used to have. Note that the fix for most everything I have mentioned here requires removal of the dash of the vehicle or replacement of the control head and therefore is in many cases not worth the investment if it is not an extreme problem (for example, unless the system is stuck on full heat in the middle of summer. Additionally, remember that, if you so desire, manual shutoff valves can be placed in the heater hose lines (please consult a qualified mechanic as water from a vehicle can and will scald and burn you!), allowing you to manually shut off the flow of water into the heater core, thus reducing some of the heat (Readers note that certain foreign vehicles REQUIRE water flow through the heater core at all times for engine cooling and are not candidates for this procedure!).


Parts Of BMW.

May 30, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

99 jeep cherokee no heat but blower working


now there are several thing you need to check( since you know the blower and vents are working) start the jeep. let it warm up, sorry to do this to you, but turn on the heater. under the hood are two hoses going to the heater core, by the blower. after the jeep has warmed up, and heater running for about 2 minutes, check to see if either hose got warm or hot. If yes, bad heater core. if no, then the control valve that allows hot coolant to the heater core is bad. you can trace it if you follow the line to the engine, it is connected to a valve, and valve needs to be replaced( you can get it at the auto parts store). hope this helps you

Jan 15, 2011 | 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2 Answers

Changed the thermostat, still no heat. Is there a valve of some sort in the heater hose lines or on the heater assembly that controls the hot water?


when the vehicle is cold take the radiator cap off and start the vehicle let it run with it on defrost at full blast until the vehicle gets to running temp,if there is still air in the system it will blow cold air if that doesn't work then check to see if the vacuum lines that run the blend door in the heater box have came off (depending on year)

Dec 28, 2009 | GMC Jimmy Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

There's no heat coming out of the vent, just cold air. What is the possible solution to this problem


possible low anti freeze, air bound heater core, defective heat blend door control servo. Start with coolant level, if o.k. check hoses feeding heater core. If the lines are both hot suspect blend door servo/control unit. If only one hose hot suspect clogged/air bound core. Special bleed procedure for engine. With engine running, check for bleeder scews at upper hose mounting, open bleeder and watch for steady stream of coolant. Be careful as coolant is hot. If this does not help, disconnect hoses frm heater core when cool and blow out core with compressed air to unclog system. I hope this helps.

Dec 25, 2009 | 2002 Acura 3.2TL

2 Answers

BMW E35 95, no heat coming thru vents


check the hoses going through the firewall to the heater assembly,they should be hot.there is a vacuum controlled assembly driven by the climate control assembly.check the vacuum and the cables

May 23, 2009 | 2001 BMW 5 Series

1 Answer

Warm air blower


Steam coming through the air vents indicates a leak in heater core. The heater core is like a small radiator that is used to heat the inside of your car in the winter time. The blower, blows air through the heater core and into the inside of the vehicle. The steam you are seeing is the hot coolant leaking from the core.

- Jim

Jul 17, 2008 | 1992 Audi 80

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