Question about 2000 Jeep Cherokee

6 Answers

Steering problem if you give the steering wheel a slite spin in park either way it will spin by itself all the way to the end. why----------

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  • novafish Jan 03, 2009

    I CHANGED THE POWER STEERING PUMP AND IT STILL DID NOT CHANGE. THE PROBLEM STILL EXISTS.THE PROBLEM IS THE STEERING SPINS FREELY LIKE YOUR ON ICE OR YOUR CAR IS JACKED UP.I AM THE ORIGINLE OWNER.SO NOTHING WAS MODIFIDE.

  • novafish Jan 03, 2009

    THE PROBLEM IS STILL THERE, WOULD A BAD DAMPER DO IT.

  • novafish Jan 03, 2009

    I CAN,NT GET ANY SURE FIRE ANS. SO I GUESS I WILL PUT A NEW STEERING BOX IN. THANKYOU BILL.

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6 Answers

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  • Master
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This model has Steering Assist Recirculating Ball Hydraulic steering.
Hydraulic power-assisted steering An engine driven pump pressurizes hydraulic fluid to multiply the driver's steering inputs. Primary Benefit: Power steering improves vehicle maneuverability and can reduce driver fatigue. Power steering responds more quickly and requires less effort than manual steering. Re-circulating ball steering Recirculating ball steering is a proven system in which steering forces are transmitted by ball bearings in a recirculating track surrounding a worm gear to actuate the steering linkage. Primary Benefit: Re-circulating ball steering effectively multiplies steering effort and helps isolate unwanted feedback of uneven road surfaces. It is more rugged than rack and pinion steering, making it desirable in applications such as heavy-duty trucks.


Recirculating-ball steering is used on many trucks and SUVs today. The linkage that turns the wheels is slightly different than on a rack-and-pinion system.
steering problem - steering-ball-linkage.jpg The recirculating-ball steering gear contains a worm gear. You can image the gear in two parts. The first part is a block of metal with a threaded hole in it. This block has gear teeth cut into the outside of it, which engage a gear that moves the pitman arm (see diagram above). The steering wheel connects to a threaded rod, similar to a bolt, that sticks into the hole in the block. When the steering wheel turns, it turns the bolt. Instead of twisting further into the block the way a regular bolt would, this bolt is held fixed so that when it spins, it moves the block, which moves the gear that turns the wheels. Instead of the bolt directly engaging the threads in the block, all of the threads are filled with ball bearings that recirculate through the gear as it turns. The balls actually serve two purposes: First, they reduce friction and wear in the gear; second, they reduce slop in the gear. Slop would be felt when you change the direction of the steering wheel -- without the balls in the steering gear, the teeth would come out of contact with each other for a moment, making the steering wheel feel loose. Power steering in a recirculating-ball system works similarly to a rack-and-pinion system. Assist is provided by supplying higher-pressure fluid to one side of the block.

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

  • 5 more comments 
  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 03, 2009

    The worm and sector gears have bearings as well as thrust washers or spacers that are used to adjust internal clearances. The input shaft and sector gear output shaft also have adjustment plugs, screws or shims for adjusting worm bearing preload and gear mesh preload. Accurate setting of these critical adjustments is essential because excessive clearances can make the steering feel loose, while insufficient clearances may cause the steering to bind or wear prematurely.
    Worm bearing preload is a measure of how much force is required to turn the steering gear input shaft, which depends on the amount of preload and clearance on the worm gear thrust bearings. The tighter the fit, the more force it takes to rotate the shaft.

    The preload is set by turning the large adjuster plug at the end of the worm shaft and then measuring the amount of effort it takes to rotate the shaft using an inch-pound torque wrench. Specifications vary depending on the application, so don’t guess if you don’t have accurate information or have never done this before. Adjustments are best left to those who have had experience rebuilding steering gears.

    Gear mesh preload is the amount of effort required to rotate the sector gear shaft, which depends on the clearance (lash) between the ball nut and sector gear. The adjustment is made by turning an adjuster screw or bolt on top of the sector shaft. Like worm bearing preload, it is also measured with an inch-pound torque wrench. But this measurement is typically made with the steering in the center position because this is where steering feel is most noticeable. Gear mesh preload has the greatest effect on steering feel and play. Too much lash will reduce preload and make the steering feel loose. Not enough lash will increase preload and may cause the gears to bind — especially if the vehicle has a lot of miles on it and the steering gears are worn.

    One of the most common mistakes that’s made on recirculating ball steering systems is overtightening the sector shaft adjuster screw in an attempt to eliminate looseness or play in the steering. The adjuster screw is usually easy to reach, so it’s the first thing that’s tightened down. But a small adjustment goes a long way here, so the screw should not be turned more than about 1/8th turn before rechecking steering effort and play.

    Before any adjustments are attempted, however, the first thing that should be done is to thoroughly inspect the steering linkage, suspension and wheel bearings to see if any parts are worn or damaged. This includes inner and outer tie rod ends, the center link, idler arm, pitman arm and wheel bearings. If no worn parts are found, the steering box is probably suffering from center wear — which will likely take more than a simple adjustment to fix. It will require rebuilding or replacing the steering gear.

  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 03, 2009

    POWER STEERING
    Power-assisted recirculating ball steering gears work the same way as manual gears, except that they have a sliding spool valve or a rotating spool valve and torsion bar to route hydraulic pressure to chambers on either side of a power piston that may be located inside or outside the steering box. With the internal assist type, the power piston is part of the ball nut assembly and the hydraulic chambers are on either side of the piston inside the steering box. With the external assist type, hose connect the steering box to a hydraulic cylinder attached to the steering linkage.

    The amount of power assist or "reaction control" is determined by the diameter of the torsion bar. Vehicle manufacturers fine tune the steering feel to a particular model of vehicle and powertrain by using different sized torsion bars. Thus, a larger, heavier luxury car would typically have more built-in steering assist than a smaller, sportier car. Yet the steering boxes on both cars might appear to be identical from the outside.

    AN EXPERT OPINION
    Bill Mullins of Mullins Steering Gears in Lake Havasu, AZ, is one of the few people who specialize in rebuilding steering gears. He says if a recirculating ball steering gear is worn or is suffering from an internal problem, the safest approach for most technicians today is to replace the steering box rather than attempting to rebuild it.

    "Unless you have specific training on how to rebuild steering gears, it’s best not to attempt it yourself for a number of reasons. One is that most people don’t know what to measure or the proper procedures for setting preload adjustments. It takes experience, the right tools and access to the manufacturer’s specifications. Also, internal components are not readily available from parts stores or dealers, so if internal parts are worn out there’s no way to rebuild the box unless you can get new parts. Even for a professional rebuilder, it’s often difficult to obtain certain parts. It all depends on the application. For some units you can get bushings and other parts, but for others you can’t."

    Mullins said it’s also important to make sure a replacement gear is the same as the original. "When a technician calls his local parts store for a rebuilt steering gear, he may end up with a generic gear that looks the same on the outside, but is different inside. It may have a different steering ratio, or shorter or longer steering stops. The gear will fit, but will alter the way the steering feels, the way the car handles or its U-turn radius."

    "Take a ‘92 Camaro, for example. GM offered a number of different steering boxes on the same model year depending on the engine and tire size on the vehicle," commented Mullins. A steering box for a Z28 had an entirely different ratio, feel and stops than one for a six-cylinder Camaro. So if you install the wrong replacement gear, your customer may not be happy with the results.

    "The other alternative to simply replacing the steering gear is to send the original unit to a specialty rebuilder, like ourselves, who will go through it and recondition it to like-new condition," commented Mullins.

    Mullins said that over the years Ford and Chrysler have used steering gears that appear to be the same on the outside, but provide different amounts of power assist and road feel by using different spool valve springs and torsion bars internally. "They may have dozens of variations of the same basic Saginaw model 800 steering gear, but you can’t tell one from the other just by looking at it. It’s what inside that counts."

  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 03, 2009

    STEERING GEAR REPLACEMENT
    One thing technicians should always do before replacing a steering gear is to count how many revolutions of the steering wheel it takes to go from lock to lock. This will tell you if a vehicle has a standard steering ratio or a quick ratio. A standard gear ratio of 18:1 might take 3-1/2 turns lock to lock, while a quick gear ratio of 13:1 might only take 2-1/2 turns lock to lock.

    For proper identification, it may be necessary to also have the vehicle VIN number and engine displacement as well as the year, make and model to order the correct replacement gear.

    Removing a recirculating ball steering gear is usually a straight forward process. Before unbolting anything, make sure the steering wheel is centered with the front wheels aimed straight ahead. The input shaft coupling can then be disconnected from the steering column shaft, and the pitman arm removed or disconnected from the steering linkage. The gearbox itself is usually bolted to the frame with three or four bolts. Installation is just the reverse of the removal procedure. Just make sure the steering gear is in the center position before reattaching the pitman arm and steering column shaft.

    With power units, all the old power steering fluid should be drained and the pump flushed to remove any possible contaminants before the new gear is installed. Also, hose should be carefully inspected and replaced as needed if they show any signs of deterioration or leakage. Hose can deteriorate internally allowing small pieces of rubber to flake loose and lodge in the valves within the pump or steering gear. This can cause the pump to work harder in an attempt to overcome the blockage, resulting in increased noise and steering effort. That’s why most experts recommend replacing old hose to prevent expensive pump and/or steering gear damage and comebacks.


    When hose are replaced, the system should always be flushed to remove all the old fluid before the hose are attached to the new steering gear. Power steering fluid breaks down as it ages and accumulates contaminants which can damage a new gear or pump. The viscosity of the fluid also increases over time which can increase steering effort when the fluid is cold. The fluid can also leave varnish deposits that can affect the operation of the pump and spool valves in the rack.

    Another level or protection can be added to the system by installing an aftermarket inline fluid filter. The filter will trap any residual debris in the system and provide ongoing protection as the system ages.

    When the system is refilled with fluid, it will have to be purged of air. This is done by starting the engine, allowing the power steering fluid to warm up, then slowly turning the steering wheel from side to side, six to 10 times (do not turn too rapidly, do not hold at either locked position or allow the pump reservoir to run dry). If the fluid appears tan, light red, foamy or cloudy, it’s still full of air. Continue purging until the fluid clears. Make sure the fluid reservoir is full when you’re finished.

    Always use the type of power steering fluid specified by the vehicle manufacturer. Do not use ordinary ATF unless it is specified by the vehicle manufacturer. Using the wrong type of fluid may cause seal swelling and leakage and may void the warranty on a replacement pump or steering gear.

    Another item that needs to be inspected, adjusted and possibly replaced is the drive belt for the power steering pump. Replace the belt if it is frayed, cracked, glazed or oil-soaked. If the belt is more then five years old, replacement should be recommended to minimize the risk of a belt failure. Adjust belt tension to manufacturer’s specifications using a belt gauge. If the vehicle has a serpentine belt, be sure to check the automatic tensioner to make sure it is functioning properly and that the tensioner’s travel is still within an acceptable range.

    The power steering pump should also be checked to make sure it is producing the proper line pressure and that the fluid is operating at a temperature of 170 degrees F or less. Most Saginaw pumps should generate 1,000 to 1,200 pounds of line pressure. If the fluid is running over 170 degrees F, it may indicate a restriction in the return line or the need to install an aftermarket fluid cooler. Fluid that runs too hot can shorten pump life by as much as 50 percent!

  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 03, 2009

    http://www.babcox.com/editorial/bf/bf102...



    Find this information with blowup diagrams here.

  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 03, 2009
  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 03, 2009

    The recall was for broken limit stops. They were not tempered correctly abd breaking off. This is not the problem in question.

  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 03, 2009

    DO THE WHEELS MOVE IN UNISON WITH THE STEERING WHEEL.... OR JUST THE STEERING WHEEL SPINS??

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When you turn the stering you say it turn be itself like freely the wheels turn check for recall at the dealer with serial number like benimur told you if no recall go for a rebuilt stering box if it would be a hose you would have pulse when you turn the stering perre

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

  • pierre laplante Jan 03, 2009

    a bad damper would make the stering shake baly when you hit a series of bump

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Does it turn the vehicle right? Or does it just turn a lot easier than normal. Because steering ratio is the only way that i can think of that would make a difference.

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

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Hi and welcome to FixYa,

Initially, I was made to understand that there was a recall specifically on steering problems.
" VEHICLE DESCRIPTION: SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES. SOME STEERING GEAR UNITS WERE ASSEMBLED WITH INTERNAL END-OF-TRAVEL-STOPS THAT MISSED THE HEAT TREAT PROCESS, RESULTING IN SOFT INTERNAL TRAVEL STOPS."
Recall ID # 99V312000 - STEERING:GEAR BOX (OTHER THAN RACK AND PINION)

" DEALERS WILL REPLACE THE STEERING GEAR ON INVOLVED VEHICLES. "

Good luck and Thank you for using FixYa.

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

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Hi,
I think that the coupling might have broken or the coupling bolts are loose . You can check if there is somethin broken then get it replaced..
Thank you

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

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  • Master
  • 512 Answers

Sounds like maybe the steering has been modified for a handicap person to provide what they call zero resistance steering

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

  • Russell Bailey Jan 03, 2009

    that recall was only on grand cherokees . if you have canged the pump it only laves the steering gear as a possibility

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