Question about 2003 Jaguar X-Type

1 Answer

Front NS Suspension Spring Dislocated

The NS Front suspension spring on my 53 plate 3.0 X-type has dislocated its self from its bottom mount and has moved down the suspension leg - there does not seem to be any damage and I am wondering how easy it is to remove the suspension strut to be able to compress the spring at the top and hopefully wiggle the bottom back into place? How do I remove it and do I need any specialist tools?

Thanks in advance

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Dave you must have a broken spring and will have to remove the strut to fit a new one dont drive with it like that.    no special tools needed  goood luck

Posted on Jan 08, 2009

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What makes a chevy traverse makes noise ehen turning left just got new rack and pinion


take it back to the garage. maybe not the new rack but the L or r upper strut spring mount binding causing the spring to twist then to boing back into place. not the techs fault mind you.when the suspension is hung garbage is dislocated around the bearing.

Aug 15, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to replace front shocks on 2002 toyota 4runner


Steps to replace front struts (actually coil-over shocks) on 2005 Toyota 4Runner:

(1) Jack up the front of the car and remove BOTH front wheels.

(2) Remove the skid plate underneath the front of the engine by removing the 4 (four) 12mm bolts.

(3) Remove the 2 (two) nuts (one on each side of the car) that connect the anti-sway bar to the front suspension. You can now push out the link by your thumb (or by LIGHTLY tapping on the link with a wooden mallet.

(4) Remove the anti-sway bar from the car by removing the 4 (four) bolts that holds the 2 (two) mounting plates and rubber bushings. Be careful not to let the anti-sway bar fall on you when you remove the final bolt.

(5) Spray some penetrating oil on the nuts and bolts that connect the strut assembly to the suspension (one nut at the top center of the strut, three nuts at the top of the strut connecting the strut to the suspension, and one nut at the bottom of the strut).

(6) Loosen, but do not remove, the three nuts that hols the strut to the top of the suspension. DO NOT remove the center nut at the top of the strut. This nut retains the coil spring onto the strut assembly and is under some serious pressure. You could be seriously injured if you remove this nut at this time.

(7) Remove the large nut at the bottom of the strut and slid the strut off from the lower mounting stud. You may need to use some pressure to get the strut to slide off completely.

(8) Now remove the three nuts holding the strut to the suspension at the top of the strut. Note that one nut is actually the third point of the triangle and is out of sight and located "behind" the center strut nut. Although not visible from sitting in the wheel well, you can reach around the opening between the top of the strut and the body (into the engine compartment) and feel the nut and you can get a wrench on it to facilitate removal. Once these nuts are out you can remove the strut by lowering it and feeding it out between the suspension components. I actually had to move the wheels back and forth to maximize the removal space, plus rotate the entire strut several revolutions (basically "unscrew" the strut) to get it out.

(9) Once the strut is out, use coil spring compressors (purchase some from Harbour Freight or rent from a car parts store) and compress the spring until it is loose enough to rotate inside the strut.

(10) Once the spring is compressed, remove the center nut from the top of the strut and disassemble the pieces paying particular attention to the order of removal. You will probably have to hold the strut shaft with a wrench while removing the center nut to keep the shaft from rotating.

(11) Assembly is the reverse.

NOTE that I purchased Monroe struts and the instructions were missing from the box. The directions on the outside of the box were worse than useless, and the struts did not seem right as any combination of the washers and bushings provided in the box did not allow proper fit as the spring was loose after removal of the spring compressors. The monroe www site did not have downloadable instructions, and Monroe failed to return my emailed requests for technical advice. I wound up returning the monroe struts and purchased from Toyota (at three times the price). Would recommend Blisteins (sp?) or some other brand other than Monroe.

FINAL NOTES: Make darn sure you have the spring compressed before you remove the center nut. You could be seriously injured if you fail to follow this step. Total time would be 3 hours for both sides without power tools, or 2 hours with power tools. Also, when removing and installing the struts, a second person would be nice the have so they can push on the suspension to allow for bolt/nut alignment.

Apr 27, 2010 | 2000 Toyota 4Runner

1 Answer

My rear end has dropped and looks crazy and will not lift


Do you have:
1. Shocks and Leaf Springs?
If so: the Shocks could be "shot" and/or broken or completely discharged. OR the Leaf Springs Retainers or the Leaf Springs have broken. The Retainers should have two (2) bolts holding braces which hold the multiple leafs of the Leaf Springs together. Check these. Also you have bushings bolted then welded to the frame that will need to be checked.
2. Struts with Coils (Springs)?
If so: the Struts could be "shot, and/or broken or completely discharged. The Coils (Springs) could be broken of dislocated.
3. Coils (Springs) without Struts?
If so: the Coils (Springs) could be broken or dislocated.
4. Independent Bar Suspension?
If so: the independent bars could be bent, broken or dislocated from their frame connections with the frame.
5. Solid Axle?
If so: the Axle could be bent, broken or dislocated from their frame connections with the frame.
Since you cannot lift the vehicle, I am assuming you are using the jack under the axle to lift? This would point to the Axle/Bars being broken.

Was an excessive load (weight) put on the back of the SUV lately?

If you can't lift the rear of the vehicle, jack-up and properly support the front then jack-up and support the middle towars the rear of the vehicle to gain access to the rear of the vehicle for a better look.
However while doing this if the rear starts rising: keep a careful eye on the rear tires to see if they are going lower than what they would normally go when you are jacking-up the rear, especially with a broken Axle or Bars. THIS COULD CAUSE THE BROKEN OR DISLOCATED PARTS TO FURTHER BREAK OR CAUSE OTHER CONNECTING PARTS TO FAIL AND BREAK OR COULD CAUSE DAMAGE TO THE REST OF THE SURROUNDING AREAS OF THE CAR. I have seen an Axle and Bars that were broken "pierce" into the body of the vehicle because they were not carefully watching.
Let me know if this helped, or if you have any additional information, problems, or questions. Feel free to contact me at FixYa.com!
ps...when describing your problem feel free to fully explain in as much detail as you can, including in this case what type of rear suspension system you have, 2WD, 4WD, AWD, your engine size etc. There is no limit to describing your problem. It enables us to get a very precise answer to your very precise problem quicker.

Jan 29, 2010 | 2000 Ford Expedition

3 Answers

Does This Car Have Rear "Struts" Or Shocks?? What Is the Difference?


THe 93 Mazda has both actually. The shock absorber in this car is just one component of the so called strut assembly. Read on if you want the details: Shock absorbers are simple suspension dampers that control the unwanted spring motion of the vehicle's frame caused by the suspension's springs. Struts, or strut assemblies, basically does the same thing, although they are used on a different type of suspension system and performs another function, which is to provide support for the suspension system.

A strut assembly is composed basically of a shock absorber unit, a coil spring, an upper pivot, and a lower control arm. A lot of vehicles today make use of strut assemblies instead of simple shock absorbers for the suspension system. The most popular of these strut assemblies is the MacPherson Strut for the front suspension and its rear suspension counterpart, the Chapman Strut.

Mazda vehicles are well known for their sporty looks and performance, amazing a lot of auto critics when they accelerate on paved streets and highways. Mazda vehicles, however, also has the capability of running on an off-road track without affecting the comfort that Mazda passengers feel; thanks a lot to the high quality Mazda struts they are equipped with. Original Mazda struts are guaranteed to provide every Mazda passenger a pleasurable ride, whatever kind of trail they may choose to traverse.



Jan 04, 2010 | 1993 Mazda 626

3 Answers

The rear suspension air bags no work


start here

The air suspension system is designed to improve ride, handling and general vehicle performance for static, on-road and off-road driving condition:
  • Ride is improved by using an air type spring (the soft ride is inherent).
  • Handling is improved by maintaining constant vehicle attitude.
The system consists of unique rear air springs, air compressor, air lines, air spring solenoids, height sensor, air suspension control module, attachments and associated signals derived from both driver and road inputs. With these components and signals, the air suspension control module commands changes in vehicle height that are necessary for the load leveling features.
The load leveling feature rear air suspension (RAS) systems shall automatically make adjustments in vehicle height so that the vehicle is always at trim height and constant front-to-rear vehicle attitudes are maintained over the expected load range of the vehicle. Adjustments in height that are necessary to correct height differences between the vehicle's left and right sides for RAS system shall be restricted to what can be reliably achieved with one air suspension height sensor.
The system uses one air suspension height sensor, a steering sensor, generic electronic module (GEM) transfer case inputs, and other vehicle sensors to measure driver and road inputs. The system changes vehicle height using an air compressor, two air lines, and the use of an air spring with an air spring solenoid.
The air suspension system holds vehicle height when the rear hatch or any door is opened. The system stores rear vehicle height the moment any open door is detected. The system then maintains this height regardless of the addition or removal of a load. The system will return to its commanded height when all doors are closed and the vehicle speed exceeds 16 km/h (10 mph).
Air Suspension Switch
The air suspension switch is located behind the RH kick panel on a mounting bracket. The switch interrupts power to the air suspension control module.
The air suspension switch supplies a signal to the air suspension control module. Without the air suspension control module receiving this signal the load leveling system is inoperative and will not react when rear of the vehicle is raised or lowered. If the air suspension system is disabled by turning off air suspension switch, a "CHECK SUSP" will appear in the RH corner of the instrument cluster with the ignition in the run position.
Air Compressor
The RAS air compressor:
  • Is not interchangeable with four wheel air suspension (4WAS) compressor.
  • Consists of the compressor and vent solenoid; neither are replaceable as individual items.
  • Is mounted in the engine compartment between the washer fluid bottle and headlamp (RH front corner).
  • Is a single cylinder electric motor driven unit that provides pressurized air as required.
  • Is powered by a solid state relay, controlled by the air suspension control module.
  • Passes pressurized air through the compressor air drier that contains silica gel (a drying agent). Moisture is then removed from the compressor air drier when vented air passes out of the system during vent operation.
  • Air drier has a single port and is not interchangeable with 4WAS compressor air drier.
  • Air drier may be replaced separately.
  • Incorporates a snorkle that may be replaced separately.
The vent solenoid:
  • Allows air to escape from the system during venting actions.
  • Is located in the air compressor cylinder head.
  • Has a 160 psi internal relief valve.
  • Shares a common electrical connector with the air compressor motor.
  • Is enclosed in the cylinder head casting, which forms an integral valve housing that allows the valve tip to enter the pressurized side of the system.
  • Has an O-ring seal that prevents air leakage past the valve tip.
  • Opens when the air suspension control module determines lowering is required.
  • Provides an escape route for pressurized air that opens when system pressures exceed safe operating levels.
  • Is replaced with the air compressor as a unit.
Air Spring
RAS vehicles use air springs in the rear. The air springs provide a varying spring rate proportional to the systems air pressure and volume. The air suspension system regulates the air pressure in each air spring by compressing and venting the system air. Increasing air pressure (compressing) raises the rear of the vehicle while decreasing air pressure (venting) lowers the rear of the vehicle. Vehicle height is maintained by the addition and removal of air in each air spring through an air spring solenoid installed in the upper spring cap and energized through the air suspension control module.
The air springs are mounted between the axle spring seats and the frame upper spring seats.
The two air springs replace the conventional rear coil springs.
Air Suspension Height Sensor
When the air suspension height sensor indicates that the rear of the vehicle is lower than trim under normal driving conditions, the air compressor will turn on and pump compressed air to the air springs. When the sensor indicates that the rear of the vehicle is raised above trim under normal driving conditions, this will cause the air to be vented from the air springs to lower the vehicle back to its trim height level.
One air suspension height sensor is mounted on the vehicle. The air suspension height sensor sends a voltage signal to the air suspension control module. The output ranges from approximately 4.75 volts at minimum height (when the vehicle is low or in full jounce), to 0.25 volts at maximum height (when the vehicle is high or in full rebound). The air suspension height sensor has a useable range of 80 mm (3 in) compared to total suspension travel of 200-250 mm (8 to 10 in) at the wheel. Therefore, the air suspension height sensor is mounted to the suspension at a point where full rear suspension travel at the wheel is relative to 80 mm of travel at the air suspension height sensor. The air suspension height sensor is attached between the No. 5 frame crossmember (upper socket) and the panhard rod (lower socket). Replace the air suspension height sensor as a unit.
Compressor Relay
The compressor relay is energized by the air suspension control module to allow high current to flow from the battery to the compressor motor.
  • A solid state relay is used in the air suspension system for air compressor control. The relay incorporates a custom power metal oxide semi-conductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) and ceramic hybrid circuitry. The relay switches high current loads in response to low power signals and is controlled by the logic of the air suspension control module.
Air Suspension Control Module
NOTE: The 4WAS air suspension control module is used for the RAS system. The internal processor recognizes external circuitry to determine if it is installed in a 4WAS or a RAS equipped vehicle.
NOTE: The air suspension control module is calibrated with information from the air suspension height sensor. A new or exchanged air suspension control module requires a ride height adjustment calibration process to be performed.
The air suspension control module controls the air compressor motor (through a solid state relay), and the air spring solenoids. The air suspension control module also provides power to the air suspension height sensor. The air suspension control module controls vehicle height adjustments by monitoring the air suspension height sensor, vehicle speed, a steering sensor, acceleration input, the door ajar signal, transfer case signals, and the brake pedal position (BPP) switch. The air suspension control module also conducts all fail-safe and diagnostic strategies and contains self-test and communication software for testing of the vehicle and related components.
The air suspension control module is mounted in the passenger compartment inside the instrument panel above the radio and temperature controls.
The air suspension control module monitors and controls the air suspension system through a 32-pin two-way connector. The air suspension control module is keyed so that the air suspension control module cannot be plugged into an incorrect harness. There are two sides of the harness connection to the air suspension control module. Each is uniquely colored and keyed to prevent reversing the connections.
Air Suspension Diagnostic Connector
The air suspension diagnostic connector is used to aid the technician in diagnosing the air suspension system. It is also used to vent the system of compressed air when air suspension system components need to be repaired or replaced. The air suspension diagnostic connector is located under steering column.

Oct 02, 2009 | 1998 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

I need a rear suspension diagram for a 1999 Mercury Cougar


0218b1b.gif
Item Part Number Description 1 Body mounting cup 2 Spring seat 3 Spring 4 Strut 5 Crossmember 6 Stabilizer bar 7 Front arm 8 Rear arm 9 Wheel spindle 10 Tie-bar 11 Dust cap 12 Brake drum 13 Hub retaining nut 14 Hub and bearing assembly 15 Backing plate 16 ABS sensor 17 Tie-bar mounting bracket

Sep 02, 2009 | 1999 Mercury Cougar

2 Answers

What is the name of the bracket the spring sits in on 1994 f150 4x4 single shock frnt end bolts to the frame


If it's the part on the upper end of the coilspring, and it is a coilover suspension in front (meaning the shock absorber is mounted in the middle of the coilspring) then it is a called the shock top plate, and if it is a model where the shock absorver and coilspring are mounted one beside the other, then the bracket is called simply the spring seat. Although in both cases you can just ask for a spring seat for the front suspension and they will give you the right part and will know what you're talking about. If it is the part on the lower end of the coilspring, then it is called the control arm and is usually a one piece unit consisting of the control arm itself, the ball joints and the mount bushings.

Jul 27, 2009 | 1994 Ford F150 Styleside Supercab

3 Answers

Rear air bag suspension failure 1998 Ford EXP E.B. 2x2


this will get you started. report back on progress and we'll go from there. There is a diagnostic test that will provide codes I think. I will look.

The system consists of unique rear air springs, air compressor, air lines, air spring solenoids, height sensor, air suspension control module, attachments and associated signals derived from both driver and road inputs. With these components and signals, the air suspension control module commands changes in vehicle height that are necessary for the load leveling features.
The load leveling feature rear air suspension (RAS) systems shall automatically make adjustments in vehicle height so that the vehicle is always at trim height and constant front-to-rear vehicle attitudes are maintained over the expected load range of the vehicle. Adjustments in height that are necessary to correct height differences between the vehicle's left and right sides for RAS system shall be restricted to what can be reliably achieved with one air suspension height sensor.
The system uses one air suspension height sensor, a steering sensor, generic electronic module (GEM) transfer case inputs, and other vehicle sensors to measure driver and road inputs. The system changes vehicle height using an air compressor, two air lines, and the use of an air spring with an air spring solenoid.
The air suspension system holds vehicle height when the rear hatch or any door is opened. The system stores rear vehicle height the moment any open door is detected. The system then maintains this height regardless of the addition or removal of a load. The system will return to its commanded height when all doors are closed and the vehicle speed exceeds 16 km/h (10 mph).
Air Suspension Switch
The air suspension switch is located behind the RH kick panel on a mounting bracket. The switch interrupts power to the air suspension control module.
The air suspension switch supplies a signal to the air suspension control module. Without the air suspension control module receiving this signal the load leveling system is inoperative and will not react when rear of the vehicle is raised or lowered. If the air suspension system is disabled by turning off air suspension switch, a "CHECK SUSP" will appear in the RH corner of the instrument cluster with the ignition in the run position.
Air Compressor
The RAS air compressor:
  • Is not interchangeable with four wheel air suspension (4WAS) compressor.
  • Consists of the compressor and vent solenoid; neither are replaceable as individual items.
  • Is mounted in the engine compartment between the washer fluid bottle and headlamp (RH front corner).
  • Is a single cylinder electric motor driven unit that provides pressurized air as required.
  • Is powered by a solid state relay, controlled by the air suspension control module.
  • Passes pressurized air through the compressor air drier that contains silica gel (a drying agent). Moisture is then removed from the compressor air drier when vented air passes out of the system during vent operation.
  • Air drier has a single port and is not interchangeable with 4WAS compressor air drier.
  • Air drier may be replaced separately.
  • Incorporates a snorkle that may be replaced separately.
The vent solenoid:
  • Allows air to escape from the system during venting actions.
  • Is located in the air compressor cylinder head.
  • Has a 160 psi internal relief valve.
  • Shares a common electrical connector with the air compressor motor.
  • Is enclosed in the cylinder head casting, which forms an integral valve housing that allows the valve tip to enter the pressurized side of the system.
  • Has an O-ring seal that prevents air leakage past the valve tip.
  • Opens when the air suspension control module determines lowering is required.
  • Provides an escape route for pressurized air that opens when system pressures exceed safe operating levels.
  • Is replaced with the air compressor as a unit.
Air Spring
RAS vehicles use air springs in the rear. The air springs provide a varying spring rate proportional to the systems air pressure and volume. The air suspension system regulates the air pressure in each air spring by compressing and venting the system air. Increasing air pressure (compressing) raises the rear of the vehicle while decreasing air pressure (venting) lowers the rear of the vehicle. Vehicle height is maintained by the addition and removal of air in each air spring through an air spring solenoid installed in the upper spring cap and energized through the air suspension control module.
The air springs are mounted between the axle spring seats and the frame upper spring seats.
The two air springs replace the conventional rear coil springs.
Air Suspension Height Sensor
When the air suspension height sensor indicates that the rear of the vehicle is lower than trim under normal driving conditions, the air compressor will turn on and pump compressed air to the air springs. When the sensor indicates that the rear of the vehicle is raised above trim under normal driving conditions, this will cause the air to be vented from the air springs to lower the vehicle back to its trim height level.
One air suspension height sensor is mounted on the vehicle. The air suspension height sensor sends a voltage signal to the air suspension control module. The output ranges from approximately 4.75 volts at minimum height (when the vehicle is low or in full jounce), to 0.25 volts at maximum height (when the vehicle is high or in full rebound). The air suspension height sensor has a useable range of 80 mm (3 in) compared to total suspension travel of 200-250 mm (8 to 10 in) at the wheel. Therefore, the air suspension height sensor is mounted to the suspension at a point where full rear suspension travel at the wheel is relative to 80 mm of travel at the air suspension height sensor. The air suspension height sensor is attached between the No. 5 frame crossmember (upper socket) and the panhard rod (lower socket). Replace the air suspension height sensor as a unit.
Compressor Relay
The compressor relay is energized by the air suspension control module to allow high current to flow from the battery to the compressor motor.
  • A solid state relay is used in the air suspension system for air compressor control. The relay incorporates a custom power metal oxide semi-conductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) and ceramic hybrid circuitry. The relay switches high current loads in response to low power signals and is controlled by the logic of the air suspension control module.
Air Suspension Control Module
NOTE: The 4WAS air suspension control module is used for the RAS system. The internal processor recognizes external circuitry to determine if it is installed in a 4WAS or a RAS equipped vehicle.
NOTE: The air suspension control module is calibrated with information from the air suspension height sensor. A new or exchanged air suspension control module requires a ride height adjustment calibration process to be performed.
The air suspension control module controls the air compressor motor (through a solid state relay), and the air spring solenoids. The air suspension control module also provides power to the air suspension height sensor. The air suspension control module controls vehicle height adjustments by monitoring the air suspension height sensor, vehicle speed, a steering sensor, acceleration input, the door ajar signal, transfer case signals, and the brake pedal position (BPP) switch. The air suspension control module also conducts all fail-safe and diagnostic strategies and contains self-test and communication software for testing of the vehicle and related components.
The air suspension control module is mounted in the passenger compartment inside the instrument panel above the radio and temperature controls.
The air suspension control module monitors and controls the air suspension system through a 32-pin two-way connector. The air suspension control module is keyed so that the air suspension control module cannot be plugged into an incorrect harness. There are two sides of the harness connection to the air suspension control module. Each is uniquely colored and keyed to prevent reversing the connections.
Solenoid Valve, Air Spring
swj~us~en~file=ani_caut.gif~gen~ref.gif WARNING: Never rotate an air spring solenoid valve to the release slot in the end cap fitting until all pressurized air has escaped from the spring to prevent damage or injury.
The air spring solenoid:
  • allows air to enter and exit the air spring during leveling operations.
  • is electrically operated and controlled by the air suspension control module.
Air Suspension Diagnostic Connector
The air suspension diagnostic connector is used to aid the technician in diagnosing the air suspension system. It is also used to vent the system of compressed air when air suspension system components need to be repaired or replaced. The air suspension diagnostic connector is located under steering column.

Jun 01, 2009 | 1998 Ford Expedition

2 Answers

No power to rear bags its down but wont air up bags dont seem cracked unplugged connector no power I tried resetting still no power


is switch on?
The air suspension switch and bracket is mounted below the RH side of the instrument panel.

Dealer can run diagnostic test with scan tool for fault codes.
----------

The air suspension system is designed to improve ride, handling and general vehicle performance for static, on-road and off-road driving conditions:
  • Ride is improved by using an air type spring (the soft ride is inherent).
  • Handling is improved by maintaining constant vehicle attitude.
The system consists of unique rear air springs, the air compressor, air lines, air spring solenoids, height sensor, air suspension control module, attachments and associated signals derived from both driver and road inputs. With these components and signals, the air suspension control module commands changes in vehicle height that are necessary for the load leveling features.
The load leveling feature rear air suspension (RAS) systems shall automatically make adjustments in vehicle height so that the vehicle is always at trim height and constant front-to-rear vehicle attitudes are maintained over the expected load range of the vehicle. Adjustments in height that are necessary to correct height differences between the vehicle's left and right sides for the RAS system shall be restricted to what can be reliably achieved with one air suspension height sensor.
The system uses one air suspension height sensor, a steering sensor, generic electronic module (GEM) and other vehicle sensors to measure driver and road inputs. The system changes vehicle height using an air compressor, two air lines and the use of air springs with air spring solenoids.
The air suspension system holds vehicle height when the rear hatch or any door is opened. The system stores rear vehicle height the moment any open door is detected. The system then maintains this height regardless of the addition or removal of a load. The system will return to its commanded height when all doors are closed or the vehicle speed exceeds 16 km/h (10 mph).
------------------------------------
Air Spring
RAS vehicles use air springs in the rear. The air springs provide a varying spring rate proportional to the systems air pressure and volume. The air suspension system regulates the air pressure in each air spring by compressing and venting the system air. Increasing air pressure (compressing) raises the rear of the vehicle while decreasing air pressure (venting) lowers the rear of the vehicle. Vehicle height is maintained by the addition and removal of air in each air spring through an air spring solenoid installed in the upper spring cap and energized through the air suspension control module.
The two air springs support the conventional rear leaf coil springs.
Air Suspension Height Sensor
One air suspension height sensor is mounted on the vehicle. The air suspension height sensor sends a voltage signal to the air suspension control module. The output ranges from approximately 4.75 volts at minimum height (when the vehicle is low or in full jounce), to 0.25 volts at maximum height (when the vehicle is high or in full rebound). The air suspension height sensor has a useable range of 80 mm (3.2 in) compared to total suspension travel of 200-250 mm (8 to 10 in) at the wheel. Therefore, the air suspension height sensor is mounted to the suspension at a point where full rear suspension travel at the wheel is relative to 80 mm (3.2 in) of travel at the air suspension height sensor. The air suspension height sensor is attached between the No. 5 frame crossmember (upper socket) and the panhard rod (lower socket).
When the air suspension height sensor indicates that the rear of the vehicle is lower than trim under normal driving conditions, the air compressor will turn on and pump compressed air to the air springs. When the sensor indicates that the rear of the vehicle is raised above trim under normal driving conditions, this will cause the air to be vented from the air springs to lower the vehicle back to its trim height level.
Compressor Relay
The compressor relay is energized by the air suspension control module to allow high current to flow from the battery to the compressor motor.
  • A solid state relay is used in the air suspension system for air compressor control. The relay incorporates a custom power metal oxide semi-conductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) and ceramic hybrid circuitry. The relay switches high current loads in response to low power signals and is controlled by the logic of the air suspension control module.
Air Suspension Control Module
NOTE: The 4WAS air suspension control module is used for the RAS system. The internal processor recognizes external circuitry to determine if it is installed in a 4WAS or a RAS equipped vehicle.
NOTE: The air suspension control module is calibrated with information from the air suspension height sensor. A new or exchanged air suspension control module requires a ride height adjustment calibration process to be performed.
The air suspension control module controls the air compressor motor (through a solid state relay), and the air spring solenoids. The air suspension control module also provides power to the air suspension height sensor. The air suspension control module controls vehicle height adjustments by monitoring the air suspension height sensor, vehicle speed, a steering sensor, acceleration input, the door ajar signal, transfer case signals, and the brake pedal position (BPP) switch. The air suspension control module also conducts all fail-safe and diagnostic strategies and contains self-test and communication software for testing the vehicle and related components.
The air suspension control module monitors and controls the air suspension system through a 32-pin two-way connector. The air suspension control module is keyed so that the air suspension control module cannot be plugged into an incorrect harness. There are two sides of the harness connection to the air suspension control module. Each is uniquely colored and keyed to prevent reversing the connections.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Visual Inspection Chart Mechanical Electrical
  • Restricted suspension movement
  • Excessive vehicle load
  • Cut, severed or crimped air line(s)
  • Unmounted height sensor
  • Damaged air spring(s)
  • Open fuses:
    • Central junction box (CJB) Fuse 4 (15A), 6 (5A) and 20 (5A)
    • Battery junction box (BJB) Fuse 109 (50A)
  • Loose, corroded or disconnected connectors
  • Air suspension switch is in the OFF position
  • Damaged solenoid valve(s)


-----------------------------------------------------------
  • The compressor is inoperative
  • BJB Fuse 109 (50A).
  • Air compressor assembly.
  • Circuitry.
  • Air suspension relay.

Apr 30, 2009 | 2000 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

Front spring and shock assembly diagram


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Item Part Number Description 1 5310 Front Coil Spring 2 18124 Front Shock Absorber 3 3A130 Tie Rod End 4 1104 Wheel Hub 5 3K185 Front Wheel Knuckle 6 3078 Front Suspension Lower Arm 7 5482 Front Stabilizer Bar 8 5K484 Stabilizer Bar Link 9 N806899-S60 Bolt (4 Req'd) 10 5486 Stabilizer Bar Bracket 11 5484 Rack and Pinion Mounting Bracket Insulator (2 Req'd) (Position Slits Toward Front of Vehicle) 12 W520214-S60 Nut (2 Req'd) 13 N807144-S60 Nut (2 Req'd) 14 N803990-S60 Bolt (2 Req'd) 15 N806364-S60 Nut (2 Req'd) 16 N808466-S428 Nut (2 Req'd) 17 N808391-S100 Bolt (2 Req'd) 18 N807089-S101 Nut (2 Req'd) 19 W500746-S426 Bolt (2 Req'd) 20 W520214-S60 Nut (2 Req'd) 21 N804608-S1428 Nut (2 Req'd) 22 N804002-S100 Washer (2 Req'd) (Dished Side Up) 23 18183 Front Shock Absorber Mounting Bracket (2 Req'd) 24 3B455 Front Suspension Bearing and Seal (2 Req'd) 25 N811008-S100 Washer (2 Req'd)(Dished Side Up) 26 N803766-S60 Nut (6 Req'd) A — Install With Color Code at Bottom of Link — Green—RH Side, Red—LH Side B — Tighten to 30-40 Nm (22-29 Lb-Ft) C — Notches and Stamped "Front" Toward Front Of Vehicle D — Tighten to 47-63 Nm (35-46 Lb-Ft) E — Tighten to 77-103 Nm (57-75 Lb-Ft) F — Tighten to 98-132 Nm (72-97 Lb-Ft) G — Tighten to 68-92 Nm (50-67 Lb-Ft) H — Tighten to 53-72 Nm (39-53 Lb-Ft)

Dec 30, 2008 | 1995 Ford Taurus

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