Question about 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

PO171 OBD-II Trouble Code Engine Rough Idle When Under Load

Current Freeze Frame Data on scanner, as follows:

RPM: 832
Engine Load: 16 %
MAP KPA: 41
Coolent Temp: 114
ST FTRM1: 26.5
LT FTRM1: 32.04
LT FTRM3: -2.2
LT FTRM3: -52.2
Fuel System Closed

Have replaced fuel filter/regulator, 02 sensors, air Inlet sensor, removed & cleaned throtlle body, checked voltages on throttle position sensor, MAP sensor with VOM meter and checks out OK. Checked fuel pressure at rail schrader valve and OK. Pulled and cleaned spark plugs. Checked and found no apparent vacuum leaks

Previously, engine would idle fine for about 30 minutes than after it was up to temperature with load ( accelerate to 2000 rpm, with AC on ) engine would stumble.

I'm totally baffled. Do I focus on vacuum related issue or fuel relatd issue. Maybe waer in fuel ? Injectors ? Would appreciate your advice.

Jim Colman

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  • Master
  • 740 Answers

Check EGR valve. Also check all injector pulses with NOID light especially when vehicle is stumbling. It may be computer related. Get back to me if you need more help. Good Luck

Posted on Dec 28, 2008

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What is a solution to fixing the mass air flow system, with code po121


DTC P0121: Throttle Position (TP) Sensor 1 Performance
Circuit/System Description
The engine control module (ECM) uses the following information to calculate an expected airflow rate:
?€¢
The throttle position (TP)


?€¢
The barometric pressure (BARO)


?€¢
The manifold absolute pressure (MAP)


?€¢
The intake air temperature (IAT)


?€¢
The engine RPM


P0121 The predicted air flow and the predicted MAP combined are outside a calibrated range for more than 3 seconds.
Circuit/System Testing

  1. Inspect for the following conditions:
  2. ?€¢
    Vacuum hoses for splits, kinks, and proper connections as shown on Vehicle Emission Control Information label


    ?€¢
    Inspect thoroughly for any type of leak or restriction


    ?€¢
    Air leaks at throttle body mounting area and intake manifold sealing surfaces


    ?€¢
    Throttle body for dirt, debris, and coking--Refer to Throttle Body Cleaning.

  3. Allow the engine to reach operating temperature. Observe the MAP Sensor Voltage parameter with a scan tool. Voltage should be more than 0.8 volt and less than 4 volts.
  4. ?‡'
    If more than 4 volts or less than 0.8 volt, refer to DTC P0106.

  5. Idle the engine. Observe the MAP Sensor kPa parameter with a scan tool. Increase the engine speed slowly and then back to idle. The MAP sensor kPa should change smoothly and gradually as engine speed is increased and returned to idle.
  6. ?‡'
    If the MAP sensor kPa does not change, refer to DTC P0106.

  7. Take a snapshot of the engine data list while performing the actions listed below. The mass air flow (MAF) sensor g/s should change smoothly and gradually as the engine speed is increased and is returned to idle.
  8. ?€¢
    Idle the engine.


    ?€¢
    Increase the engine speed slowly to 3,000 RPM, then back to idle.


    ?€¢
    Exit from the snapshot and review the data.


    ?€¢
    Observe the Mass Air Flow (MAF) Sensor parameter frame by frame with a scan tool. The MAF sensor g/s should change smoothly and gradually as the engine speed is increased and is returned to idle.


    ?‡'
    If the MAF sensor g/s does not change smoothly and gradually as the engine speed is increased and is returned to idle, refer to DTC P0101 or P1101.

  9. Inspect the throttle body for the following conditions:
?€¢
Loose or damaged throttle blade


?€¢
Broken throttle shaft


?€¢
Any throttle body damage


?‡'
If any of these conditions exist, replace the throttle body assembly.

Jun 20, 2015 | 2008 GMC Sierra 1500 2WD

1 Answer

Code p1128 weak mixture lose power on inclines engine light on melts spark plugs vehicle hyundia accent 2001


Go to www.hmaservice.com and register your vehicle by VIN #..
you'll then have access to wiring diagrams, shop manuals,
service bulletins, illustrations, etc. To diagnose a 2000 or 2001 1.5L Accent Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) P1128 (FUEL SYSTEM LEAN -- PART LOAD), check the following:
  • Check the intake system for air leaks.
  • Check that the Mass Air Flow (MAF) Sensor (P/N 28164-22610) operation meets the specifications listed below. If the MAF sensor output is significantly lower than the reference value (10% or more), then replace the MAF sensor.
Table 1: Using the Hi-Scan Pro in the Hyundai Diagnostic Menus Current Data Screen TPS (%) 0
3.5
5.1
7.4
MAF (kg/h) 10
21
30
47
RPM IDLE
2000
3000
4000
Table 2: Using the Hi-Scan Pro in the OBD-II Menus Current Data Screen TPS (%) 0
3.5
5.1
7.4
MAF (g/h) 2.8
6
8.5
12.7
RPM IDLE
2000
3000
4000


WITH MANUAL TRANSMISSION


Table 3: Using the Hi-Scan Pro in the Hyundai Diagnostic Menus Current Data Screen TPS (%) 0
2.4
3.9
5.9
MAF (kg/h) 9.5
19.4
28.8
43
RPM IDLE
2000
3000
4000
Table 4: Using the Hi-Scan Pro in the OBD-II Menus Current Data Screen TPS (%) 0
2.4
3.9
5.9
MAF (g/h) 2.5
5.5
8
12
RPM IDLE
2000
3000
4000

Jun 26, 2011 | Hyundai Accent Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

95 cadillac reading code current p105 sometimes engine light comes on sometimes harder to start than normal, idles up and down up on stopping


Symptoms Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
  • Poor running engine
  • Engine runs rich
  • Engine won't idle
  • Engine backfires through tailpipe
  • Engine misfire under load or at idle
  • MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
  • In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination
Causes A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
  • MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
  • Bad MAP Sensor
  • Bad TPS
  • Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
  • Damaged or problematic TPS connector
  • Damaged wiring
  • Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP Sensor
  • Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
  • Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Bad PCM
Possible Solutions Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).
NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened
If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:
NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105
  1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
  2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.
Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:
  1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
  2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
  3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

Jun 17, 2011 | 1995 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

Code po105 pops up i had it reset and every 3-4 days it lights back up what does it mean ?


Generic code results from http://www.obd-codes.com/p0105 :

P0105 - MAP Circuit Malfunction

Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction

The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

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Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:

  • Poor running engine
  • Engine runs rich
  • Engine won't idle
  • Engine backfires through tailpipe
  • Engine misfire under load or at idle
  • MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
  • In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

A P0105 DTC could be caused by:

  • MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
  • Bad MAP sensor
  • Bad TPS
  • Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
  • Damaged or problematic TPS connector
  • Damaged wiring
  • Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
  • Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Bad PCM

Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

  1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
  2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:

  1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
  2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
  3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

Feb 27, 2011 | Jaguar X-Type Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have this eobd code problem p0105 in my elantra, where those sensors?


P0105 - Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction
The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
* Poor running engine
* Engine runs rich
* Engine won't idle
* Engine backfires through tailpipe
* Engine misfire under load or at idle
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
* In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

Causes: A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
* MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
* Bad MAP sensor
* Bad TPS
* Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
* Damaged or problematic TPS connector
* Damaged wiring
* Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
* Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions:
Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:
1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

MAP sensor codes include P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109 .


LOCATIONS:
Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor: The MAP sensor is located against the firewall to the left side of the engine.
Barometric Pressure Sensor: This sensor is installed on the VAF sensor; Volume Air Flow Sensor Is located in the air intake plenum assembly.

Hope this helps.

Jan 24, 2011 | 2001 Hyundai Elantra

1 Answer

Looking for the OBDll connector for a 1996 Toyota Corolla ll Windy Model with a1N-T, 1453 cc turbo diesel engine. Steering wheel is on the passenger side of the car. Need this info for a friend. He has...


Look under the dash near where the steering wheel is usually located (on the driver's side).

Was this vehicle marketed in the U.S.?
1996-97 MODELS NOTE: These models require the use of the Toyota's hand held scan tool or an equivalent OBD II compliant scan tool.
  1. Prepare the scan tool according to the manufacturers instructions.
  2. Connect the OBD II scan tool, to the DLC3 under the instrument panel. The DLC3 on the 1996-97 models is located on the drivers side under the dash 88274pa2.jpg
    NOTE: When the diagnosis system is switched from the normal mode to the check mode, it erases all Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC) and freeze frame data recorded. Before switching modes, always check the DTC and freeze frame data and write them down.
  3. Turn the ignition switch to the ON and switch the OBD II scan tool switch on.
  4. Use the OBD II scan tool to check the DTC and freeze frame data. Write them down.
  5. Compare the codes found to the applicable diagnostic code chart. If necessary, refer to the individual component tests in this section. If the component tests are OK, test the wire harness and connectors for shorts, opens and poor connections.
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Oct 05, 2010 | 1996 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

I have a p0105 error. They say this is a dirty body throttle. How can I clean this myself? My car is a 2002 Chevy Envoy.


DTC P0105 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction or Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction


What does that mean?
The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

Symptoms: Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
* Poor running engine
* Engine runs rich
* Engine won't idle
* Engine backfires through tailpipe
* Engine misfire under load or at idle
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
* In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

Causes: A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
* MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
* Bad MAP sensor
* Bad TPS
* Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
* Damaged or problematic TPS connector
* Damaged wiring
* Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
* Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions: Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:

1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

MAP sensor codes include P0105, P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109 .


Hope helps (remember rated this).

Jul 09, 2010 | 2002 GMC Envoy

1 Answer

How to troubleshoot code p0410 2004 trailblazer...any solutions?


Trouble Code: P0410 (4.2L L6 VIN S Auto)
HO2S 1 Insufficient Response Print this code dataprint_icon_codes.gif Number of Trips to Set Code: 1
OBD II Monitor Type: CCM Details
Indicators: MIL Details
Trouble Code Conditions:
  • DTCs P0105, P0107, P0108, P0112, P0113, P0122, P0123, P0130, P0131, P0132, P0133, P0134, P0171, P0172, P0300, P0301-P0304, P0341, P0506, P0507, P0601, P0602 are not set.
  • The AIR system is commanded ON for more than 20 seconds.
  • The IAT is between 1-151°C (32-302°F).
  • The engine coolant temperature (ECT) is between 5-114°C (41-230°F).
  • The start up ECT is between 3-50°C (37-122°F).
  • The battery voltage is more than 11 volts.
  • The engine run time is more than 200 seconds.
  • The vehicle is operating in fuel trim cells 16 or 17.
  • The throttle position (TP) change is less than 5 percent.
  • The manifold absolute pressure (MAP) is less than 30 kPa.
  • The engine speed is more than 1,150 RPM.

Possible Causes:
  • An intermittent may be caused by any of the following conditions:
    • Low system airflow
    • Excessive exhaust system back-pressure
    • Pinched, restricted, split, or damaged pipes/hoses
    • Restrictions in the AIR pump inlet hose
    • Pitted contacts in the AIR pump relay, AIR solenoid relay--Tap on the AIR pump relay or AIR solenoid relay to attempt to duplicate an intermittent condition.
    • Heat damage to the AIR outlet hose may indicate an shut-off valve failure
    • Yellow tinted water in the AIR pump may indicate an shut-off valve failure
    • Water or debris ingested into the AIR pump
    • Observe the Freeze Frame/Failure Records to aid in conditions of setting DTC P0410

Feb 13, 2010 | 2004 Chevrolet TrailBlazer

1 Answer

1998 dodge ram pickup 318 eng. engine idle rough on warm-up engine idle rough after warm-up shutting off engine and starting back up engine also runs sluggish in over drive at a low idle. I have...


If the engine seems to run fine over 1450 RPM maybe there is a vacuum hose leaking or EGR valve is slightly stuck open. Any help from the OBD II trouble codes? Or is there simply no MIL and no stored information in the OBD II computer read at the local parts store through the connector by the drivers knee?

Dec 04, 2009 | 1998 Dodge Ram 1500 4WD

1 Answer

PO171 OBD-II Trouble Code " System Lean To Bank 1


Check PCV valve and be sure it is not stuck open.  Check for vacuum leak at intake manifold.  

Dec 28, 2008 | 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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