Question about 2000 Toyota Celica

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Front brake inbalance

Failed MOT inbalance over 25%. new discs and pads fitted 1600 miles ago because of corrosion on discs

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Bleed your brakes first, and make sure no air in lines, second check the poportional valve located after the master cylinder. follow the lines from the master cylinder to find it, last but not least abs system, run diagnostics and the code should lead you to your problem, if yu want the factory service manuals with troubleshooting guides, go to alldatadiy.com and purchase a subscription, 20.00 and you will have all manuals on your car.

Posted on Dec 27, 2008

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My brakes are squeaking


Remove brake pads..front. Deglaze discs and pads and use created on the back of the pads.
Discs must be grease free.
When installed and sensor fitted, ensure sliders are free before pumping brake pedal a few times.
Road test and remember to bedcin brakes again for 500 miles

May 13, 2014 | Rover 200 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

How to change brake pad and check rotors


Brake Pads Removal & Installation Front for_car_toy_cam_02-04_sst_frt_dsc_asm.gif

To Remove:
  1. Drain brake fluid to ½ full level in reservoir.
  2. Remove the front wheels. toy_car_cam_frontbrakepads.gif

  3. Remove the front brake caliper assembly.
  4. Remove the 2 anti-squeal shims from each of the 2 brake pads.
  5. Remove the wear indicator from each of the 2 brake pads.
To Install:
NOTE: When replacing worn pads, the anti-squeal shims must be replaced together with the pads.
toy_car_cam_frontbrakepads.gif

  1. Using a large C clamp or equivalent press piston into the caliper.
  2. Apply disc brake grease to the inside of each anti-squeal shim.
  3. Install the anti-squeal shims on each pad.
  4. Install the pad wear indicator clip to the pads.
  5. Install the pads with the pad wear indicator plate facing upward.
  6. Install the brake caliper with the 2 mounting bolts. Torque the bolts 25 ft-lb (34 Nm).
  7. Install the front wheels.
  8. Fill the master cylinder with new clean brake fluid.
  9. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
Rear TMC made rear brake components toy_car_cam_tmcrearbrakes.gif

TMMK made rear brake components toy_car_cam_tmmkrearbrakes.gif

To Remove:
  1. Drain the brake fluid to ½ full level in reservoir.
  2. Remove the rear wheels.
  3. Remove the caliper slide pins.
  4. Remove the caliper slide pin bushings (TMMK made) (Kentucky).
  5. Remove the rear brake calipers.
  6. Remove the 2 brake pads with the anti-squeal shims.
  7. Remove the anti-squeal shims and pad wear indicators from brake pads.
To Install:
  1. Using a large C clamp or equivalent press the piston into the caliper.
  2. Coat both sides of the outer anti-squeal shim with pad grease.
  3. Install anti-squeal shims to each pad.
  4. Install wear indicators on the 2 brake pads.
  5. Install the caliper slide pin bushings (TMMK made) (Kentucky).
  6. Install the rear brake caliper with the slide pins. Torque the slide pins as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the caliper slide pin 25 ft-lb (34.3 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the caliper slide pin 34 ft-lb (47 Nm)
  7. Fill the master cylinder with new clean brake fluid.
  8. Pump the brake pedal several times to seat the brake pads.
  9. Install the rear wheels.
prev.gif next.gif Brake Rotor Removal & Installation Front To Remove:
  1. Remove the front wheels.
  2. Remove the front brake caliper assembly.
  3. Remove the front brake pads.
  4. Remove the 2 bolts and caliper mounting bracket.
  5. Place match marks on the disc and axle hub.
  6. Remove the front wheel disc.
To Install:
  1. Align the match marks and install the front disc.
  2. Install the brake caliper mounting bracket. Torque the bolts 79 ft-lb (107 Nm).
  3. Install the brake caliper. Torque the bolts 25 ft-lb (34 Nm).
  4. Install new gaskets and connect the brake hose to the caliper with the banjo fitting bolt. Torque the fitting bolt 22 ft-lb (29.4 Nm).
  5. Fill the reservoir with brake fluid.
  6. Bleed the brake system.
  7. Install the front wheel.
Rear To Remove:
  1. Remove the rear wheels.
  2. Remove the brake caliper assembly.
  3. Remove the brake pads.
  4. Remove the 2 bolts and the caliper mounting bracket.
  5. Place match marks on the disc and axle hub.
  6. Remove the rear disc.
To Install:
  1. Align the match marks and install the rear disc.
  2. Install the rear brake caliper mounting bracket. Torque the bracket bolts as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the bracket bolt 46 ft-lb (61.8 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the bracket bolt 34 ft-lb (47 Nm)
  3. Install the rear brake caliper with the slide pins. Torque the slide pins as follows:
    • TMC made (Japan): Torque the caliper slide pin 25 ft-lb (34.3 Nm)
    • TMMK made (Kentucky): Torque the caliper slide pin 32 ft-lb (43 Nm)
  4. Install new gaskets and connect the brake hose to the caliper with the banjo fitting bolt. Torque the fitting bolt 22 ft-lb (29.4 Nm).
  5. Fill the reservoir with brake fluid.
  6. Bleed the brake system.
  7. Install the rear wheel
prev.gif next.gif

Jan 25, 2011 | 2007 Toyota Camry

3 Answers

Rear brake pads wear out every 30000 miles on 2002 3/4 tod hd , rotors are pitted bad


That's to be expected and is completely normal.

Rear brake shoes as fitted to drum brakes can typically last up to 60k miles with periodic adjustments, but you have rear disc brakes and the shoes will typically last half of that.

Also, modern brake pads no longer contain asbestos and are now made using harder metallic compounds; the direct result is that brake discs (US=rotors) are also considered to be consumable items as they are worn down by the harder pads. It's not unusual to have to replace front discs every other pad change and rear ones with every pad change; in both cases the mileage will typically be around 30k miles on most models.

Nov 15, 2009 | 2002 GMC Sierra 2500HD

1 Answer

Suzuki Grand Vitara 1999:


Going by your description I think it could be something different, I would have the brake master cylinder checked, if you are suffering brake failure and shuddering it sounds like your callipers arent getting equal pressure when you apply the brakes. Or a freat lack of pressure to suffer brake failure. I hope this helps.

Nov 02, 2009 | 1999 Suzuki Vitara

1 Answer

Hello, I have a 2005 lancer 1600 estate from new. At 27k miles a fault developed that when braking at 40 mph the steering wheel would vibrate. This was fixed by the supplier skimming the front discs. At...


maybe the rotors are bigenuff and heat up too quick and warp but thats what they put on the car so youre out of luck,,,,you could put aftermarket rotors on it that are slotted and or crossdrilled which would greatly reduce the heat and your warping isue,,,,or maybe youre just too hard on the brakes,,try avoid sudden stops and braking at the last minute

Oct 12, 2009 | 2005 Mitsubishi Lancer

1 Answer

Remove and replace front disc brakes and rotors on 2003 landrover freelander


This is how I did it, 2003 TD4 Kalahari automatic, vented discs (earlier models have different size discs and calipers), without reference to any manual, so follow at your own risk if you feel confident and have the correct tools. It is a caliper off job, so common sense and strong wrist (to undo and retighten bolts is important). Check disc wear at the same time, to reduce the hassle of having to do it all again if the discs are shot.

Prepare a piece of stout cord. Slacken wheel nuts, jack car up and support on axle stands, remove wheel and site under front sill as precaution against axle stand/jack collapse and to clear out of area of operation, use 15mm socket to remove the two caliper fixing bolts on inside of hub. Ease caliper away from hub and tie up with cord (to reduce stress on brake hose. Remove clips from through pins and remove anti-squeal shim. Use pry bar between pads to open caliper fully (not recommended if you are going to re-fit same pads), remembering to seal reservoir to prevent fluid leakage. Try fitting new pads to caliper (I had to grind one pads metal lugs slightly to allow fitting to stainless sliders - another had already been machined by the manufacturer). Fit shims as per instructions with new pads. Re-fit anti-squeal shim & through pins and pin clips. Re-assemble in reverse sequence to dis-assembly. Car passed MOT ok, with good braking performance. NB it is important to check disc thickness. which my MOT station said is a minimum of 18mm, mine were at 19+mm after 40k.

The CD service manual is available on ebay for less than £5.00, so it might be worth checking that first, as I make no assertion that my way was the correct method, just that it worked.

Hope that helps.

Apr 18, 2009 | 2003 Land Rover Freelander

1 Answer

Audi A3 diesel 2000 reg brake pedal going to the floor with engine running and heavy pedal pressure


you should have bench bleed the master cylinder first before installation return cylinder and get a new one than bench bleed it first than install it to car once installed you may have to bleed each wheel

Jul 06, 2008 | Audi A3 Cars & Trucks

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