Question about 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix

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I'm stationed in england and have both of my Cv joint boots purging grease if I'm going to order and change both alf CV shafts what other parts would I need to order to change as well. Also what is a AR arm and how do you change it?

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You may want to change the wheel bearings while you are in there because they are pretty easy and you will be half way to removing them while changing the shafts plus they are a common problem. The A arms or the lower control arms are the arms that the lower ball joints are mounted in. If you were to jack it up just inside the wheel you would be lifting it by the control arm. You should not need to replace this unless it was damaged you probably need the the bushings. Usually just the horizontal bushing the one in the front. It looks like a hockey puck It has a metal sleeve around it that the rubber seperates from. When you jack the car up by the subframe and let the wheels hang you will see the rubber seperating if it is bad. The rear ones almost never go bad. You may also want to replace the the sway bar links they are cheap and easy and are common for breaking. The lower ball joints will also have to be seperated to change the axle shaft so you may want to get new balljoints or definatley get new boots for the because they may get ripped while seperating. You may als want to do your brake pads and rotors while your in there. I will give you moog part numbers for all the chassis parts to help you identify when ordering by the way I work in Carquest parts store.
Ball joints K5331 $75 each
sway bar link K5342 $6 each
control arm bushing K6712 $20 each

National number for wheel bearings
513179 $165 each
I hope this helps please rate or let me know if i can help you further because i also work on all this stuff.

Posted on Dec 27, 2008

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2 Answers

My volvo s60 03 isnt making any noise when I turn right or left, and there is no visible problem other than the boot being torn and grease being all over the place. Is it possible my boot is just torn and...


Yes, that's possible, especially if the joint hasn't had enough time for dirt to get inside the joint. If you remove the half shaft, you can put a new boot and clamps on it, with new grease supplied with the boot. Only thing is, the joint has to be partially disassembled, it is very messy, and takes a couple of hours. An alternative is to buy a remanufactured half shaft with both joints (inner and outer CV joints) checked for wear and new boots installed. This half shaft is ready to install-the cost of these remanned shafts is actually less than the price of one new CV joint- about $70 for a chevy half shaft as an idea of prices.

Dec 18, 2013 | 2002 Volvo S60

1 Answer

CV boot leaking


get a boot replacement kit remove axle from suspension and trans. clean old grease out of failed axle, stuff new grease into cv joint and put new boot on shaft close to joint. fill the boot with the rest of the tube of cv grease and install per instructions.

Nov 03, 2012 | 2003 Subaru Baja

2 Answers

How to change cv joints


I would replace the complete axle assembly,
it would be cheaper and come with a warranty.

Instructions
  1. Remove the CV Joint
    • Remove the boot straps from the CV joint using a standard screwdriver or a pair of diagonal cutting pliers.
    • Slide the boot back over the interconnecting shaft.
    • Get Chevrolet Info at InsideLine Free News, Videos, Photos & More!
      Detach the stop ring at the base of the CV joint assembly using a pair of snap ring pliers.

    • Pull the CV joint assembly from the interconnecting shaft to force the snap ring at the top of the shaft through the CV joint assembly.
    • Tilt the inner cage (the cage holding the balls in place inside the housing) in different angles to remove the six balls. Use your thumb or a hammer and a wooden dowel, if necessary.
    • Tilt the inner cage enough to remove it from its housing.
    • Rotate the race inside the cage--the part that holds the balls against the inner cage--and remove the race from the cage.
      Replace the CV Joint
      • Apply a thick coat of grease to the new CV joint race using special high temperature/high pressure grease (see Tips below).
      • Install the race inside the new cage. Then install the cage/race assembly inside the CV joint housing.
      • Tilt the cage at different angles and fit the new balls in place.
      • Slide a new CV joint rubber boot over the interconnecting shaft.
      • Install a new snap and stop ring on the interconnecting shaft.
      • Push the interconnecting shaft through the CV joint assembly to force the snap ring through the assembly.
      • Apply a thick coat of CV joint grease to all moving parts of the assembly.
      • Apply a coat of CV joint grease to the inside of the rubber boot. Then slide the boot over the CV joint assembly.
      • Install the boot straps at each end of the boot, and tighten the straps using a clamp tool or screwdriver, depending on the type of clamp.


Mar 22, 2012 | 1997 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

Change c.v.boot


A new boot kit will cost about 30-45 dollars. A reman half shaft, with both CV joints inspected, greased, and new boots on it, ready to install, is about double that. Last one I bought from Napa cost me 62.00.
Is your old boot torn? Unless you are sure the CV joint is still good, I would recommend buying the half-shaft. Just one CV joint costs more than the reman. jobs.

Oct 27, 2011 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I've got a 1999 2500 Chevy Silverado , that I need to change a cv boot on , can u assist me.?


CV-Joints
Overhaul
These vehicles use several different types of joints. Engine size, transaxle
type, whether the joint is an inboard or outboard joint, even which side of the
vehicle is being serviced could make a difference in joint type. Be sure to
properly identify the joint before attempting joint or boot replacement. Look
for identification numbers at the large end of the boots and/or on the end of
the metal retainer bands.

The 3 types of joints used are the Birfield Joint, (B.J.), the Tripod Joint
(T.J.) and the Double Offset Joint (D.O.J.).

NOTE: Do not disassemble a Birfield joint. Service with a new joint or
clean and repack using a new boot kit.

The distance between the large and small boot bands is important and should
be checked prior to and after boot service. This is so the boot will not be
installed either too loose or too tight, which could cause early wear and
cracking, allowing the grease to get out and water and dirt in, leading to early
joint failure.

NOTE: The driveshaft joints use special grease; do not add any grease
other than that supplied with the kit.

Double Offset Joint
To Remove:

NOTE: The Double Offset Joint (D.O.J.) is bigger than other joints
and, in these applications, is normally used as an inboard joint.


  1. Remove the halfshaft from the vehicle.
  2. Side cutter pliers can be used to cut the metal retaining bands. Remove the
    boot from the joint outer race.
  3. Locate and remove the large circlip at the base of the joint. Remove the
    outer race (the body of the joint).
  4. Remove the small snap ring and take off the inner race, cage and balls as an
    assembly. Clean the inner race, cage and balls without disassembling.
  5. If the boot is to be reused, wipe the grease from the splines and wrap the
    splines in vinyl tape before sliding the boot from the shaft.
  6. Remove the inner (D.O.J.) boot from the shaft. If the outer (B.J.) boot is
    to be replaced, remove the boot retainer rings and slide the boot down and off
    of the shaft at this time.

To Install:

NOTE: Be sure to tape the shaft splines before installing the boots.
Fill the inside of the boot with the specified grease. Often the grease supplied
in the replacement parts kit is meant to be divided in half, with half being
used to lubricate the joint and half being used inside the boot.


  1. Install the cage onto the halfshaft so the small diameter side of the cage
    is installed first. With a brass drift pin, tap lightly and evenly around the
    inner race to install the race until it comes into contact with the rib of the
    shaft. Apply the specified grease to the inner race and cage and fit them
    together. Insert the balls into the cage.
  2. Install the outer race (the body of the joint) after filling with the
    specified grease. The outer race should be filled with this grease.
  3. Tighten the boot bands securely. Make sure the distance between the boot
    bands is correct.
  4. Install the halfshaft to the vehicle.

Except Double Offset Joint
To Remove:


  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Remove the halfshaft.
  2. Use side cutter pliers to remove the metal retaining bands from the boot(s)
    that will be removed. Slide the boot from the T.J. case.
  3. Remove the snap ring and the tripod joint spider assembly from the
    halfshaft. Do not disassemble the spider and use care in handling.
  4. If the boot is be reused, wrap vinyl tape around the spline part of the
    shaft so the boot(s) will not be damaged when removed. Remove the dynamic
    damper, if used, and the boots from the shaft.

To Install:


  1. Double check that the correct replacement parts are being installed. Wrap
    vinyl tape around the splines to protect the boot and install the boots and
    damper, if used, in the correct order.
  2. Install the joint spider assembly to the shaft and install the snap ring.
  3. Fill the inside of the boot with the specified grease. Often the grease
    supplied in the replacement parts kit is meant to be divided in half, with half
    being used to lubricate the joint and half being used inside the boot. Keep
    grease off the rubber part of the dynamic damper (if used).
  4. Secure the boot bands with the halfshaft in a horizontal position. Make sure
    distance between boot bands is correct.
  5. Install the halfshaft to the vehicle and reconnect the negative battery
    cable.






Check the CV-boot for wear
tccs7030.jpg








Removing the outer band from the CV-boot
tccs7031.jpg








Removing the inner band from the CV-boot
tccs7032.jpg








Removing the CV-boot from the joint housing
tccs7033.jpg








Clean the CV-joint housing prior to removing boot
tccs7034.jpg








Removing the CV-joint housing assembly
tccs7035.jpg








Removing the CV-joint
tccs7036.jpg








Inspecting the CV-joint housing
tccs7037.jpg








Removing the CV-joint outer snap ring
tccs7038.jpg








Checking the CV-joint snap ring for wear
tccs7039.jpg








CV-joint snap ring (typical)
tccs7040.jpg








Removing the CV-joint assembly
tccs7041.jpg








Removing the CV-joint inner snap ring
tccs7042.jpg








Installing the CV-joint assembly (typical)
tccs7043.jpg




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Oct 07, 2010 | 2002 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD

1 Answer

How to replace CV joint


jack up vehicle, remove wheel, remove split pin from hub nut, remove nut, remove lower ball joint nut & separate ball joint, lever lower arm down, pull hub forward while pushing cv joint in wards through hub, remove cv gaiter clips and slide back on shaft, hold shaft firmly and knock cv joint off with hammer, pack new joint with grease, and place on shaft with nut on threads carefully knock on with hammer, re-fit parts in reverse order

Apr 24, 2010 | 1999 Hyundai Accent

1 Answer

1997 Pathfinder How do you replace the left outer cv boot?


How to Replace a CV Boot
( DIY Complexity: Hard / Time: 3.2 hours )

Parts:
1. CV Boot
2. CV Boot Clamp Kit

Tools:
1. Mallet Hammer
2. 3/8 in. Drive Ratchet
3. Combination Wrench Set
4. Floor Jack
5. Flashlight
6. Flat Head Screwdriver
7. Socket Set
8. Tire Iron

Steps:
Step 1 Secure the vehicle on a level surface, making sure the vehicle will not roll or lean too much when jacked up.
o Tip: Safety Tip:Always wear safety glasses when working on your vehicle. Wear other personal protective equipment (PPE) when necessary, for example latex gloves or safety shoes.

Step 2 Lift up the front of the vehicle using a jack.
o Tip: Using an aftermarket floor jack, instead of the original equipment (OE) jack, can make the job easier and safer. Verify the condition of the floor jack before use.

Step 3 Secure the vehicle with jack stands on both sides for safety before starting any work. The pinch welds and the frame are the two best locations. Do not rely on the jack to hold the vehicle up while working.
o Tip: Try to find a flat, level, and strong surface to put the jack stands.

Step 4 Find the correct size socket and large ratchet or tire iron and turn the wheel lug nuts counter clockwise. Remove the front wheels.
o Tip: It is a good idea to try and break the lug nuts free before you jack the wheels off the ground. This way they you will not spin the front wheels or put stress on the transaxle.
o Tip: Lug nuts fasten the wheel to the hub and may be on very tight. To gain more leverage, use a breaker bar to loosen the nuts.

Step 5 Inspect the CV boot for damage.
o Tip: The CV joint may be worn if the boot is damaged. Thoroughly inspect the CV joint assembly before installing the new boot. If the CV joint is damaged, replace the entire CV joint axle assembly.

Step 6 Mark the axle for installation reference. Remove the CV joint axle assembly.

Step 7 Using a bench vise, hold the shaft of the CV joint secure so that you can separate the CV joint from the shaft. Remove the CV boot clamps.

Step 8 Slide the CV boot off the outer CV joint.

Step 9 Using a rubber mallet, knock the CV joint off of the axle shaft.

Step 10 Remove the old boot from the CV axle shaft and wipe off any old grease. Clean the sealing surface on the CV joint.

Step 11 Fill the CV joint with grease and get it ready to slide back onto the shaft.

Step 12 Slide the new boot onto the shaft but do not tighten the inner clamp yet. Install a new retaining clip before putting the joint and axle together.

Step 13 Slide the CV joint back onto the axle shaft completely.

Step 14 Pack the boot with grease and slide the boot over the CV joint housing. Secure the boot with new clamps.

Step 15 Install the CV joint and axle back into the vehicle in the reverse order that it was removed.

Step 16 Mount the wheel back onto the hub assembly.

Step 17 Tighten lug nuts in a star pattern and torque to suggested manufacturer specifications in the vehicle owner’s manual.

Step 18 Remove jack stands.

Step 19 Lower vehicle with jack until it is securely on the ground.

Step 20 Drive the vehicle to make sure that any noises are no longer present and that there are no indications of wearing parts. Before road testing, visually inspect the area you have worked on to make sure everything is tightened and assembled properly.

Hope help with this (remember rated and comment this help).

Mar 12, 2010 | 1997 Nissan Pathfinder

1 Answer

What's involved in changing a cv joint in a 2000 Rav 4? I have very good mechanical abilities & have changed cv joints before (about 10 years ago)


Easy enough job really, jack car up, put axel stand under. remove wheel - remove hub nut, remove pinch bolt - prise open the pinch bolt part (sorry cant rem name) pop out the hub from the lower arm. Remove CV join from drive shaft. Usually a tap will pop it out.. sometimes theres a circlip that need removing (models vary). Grease up new CV joint - put grease in new boot, pop boot over drive shaft. put cv join on (replace circlip if provided in kit). join cv to hub - attach CV boot fully. fasten hub nut, replace wheel.

done. might need tracking again or aligning once you do this.

Feb 14, 2010 | 2000 Toyota RAV4

3 Answers

Clicking noises when turning


sounds like a cv joint if it is in the front end.

Feb 13, 2010 | 1989 Ford Tempo

1 Answer

How do I change the CV joints on a 1.8TD Ford Escort P reg


Hi mate

With the driveshaft removed from the vehicle.

Undo the the retaining straps on the CV boot.

Pull the CV boot up the driveshaft a little way, enough so you can clean all the old grease away.

Now look into the CV joint an locate the circlip that locks the CV to the driveshaft.

Now put the driveshaft into a vice with the CV joint facing downwards.

Now open the circlip and at the same time strike the CV joint. You can do this with a ballpin hammer if you are scrapping the CV joint. You can get a helper to stike the CV joint with a hammer while you keep the circlip open.

This will release the CV joint form the drive shaft.

Now clean the driveshaft of any old grease and fit a new CV boot if needed.

Now reverse the driveshift in the vice and fit the new CV joint. It will tap on with no trouble but do not damage it. Test it is on by trying to pull it off with your hands.

Now fill it with new grease.

Fit the CV boot to the CV joint and secure it to the CV joint.

Now it is ready to refit to your vehicle.

I trust this solves the problem for you.

Ray


Sep 08, 2009 | 1998 Ford Escort

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