Question about 1989 Dodge Ram 50

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Brake fluid cap removal?

Do you have to push down and turn? Does it turn to the left to loosen? Am I not being forceful enough with it? I don't want to break it. Thanks

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Yes it pushes down slightly,then turn counter clock-wise.(left)

Posted on Dec 25, 2008

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1 Answer

I want to know what the black cap by the oil dipstick is on a 2010 Pontiac G6?


On a 2002 mustang it is the reservoir for brake fluid. The fluid level should not be high enough to leak. One way to get too much is if someone adds fluid to the reservoir because the level is low. Its normal for the level to go down as the brake pads wear. The piston pushing on the brake pad requires more fluid to force the brake pad into the brake rotor as the pad wears. If you put more fluid in and later replace your brake pads, the pistons must be pushed back to their original position to install the new pads. Pushing back on the pistons causes a backflow of fluid to the reservoir. Since you added more fluid earlier there is now too much and it can overflow. If this is your problem you can bleed out excess fluid. The valve to bleed the fluid is down behind the wheel near the brake pad calipers.

Mar 09, 2014 | Ford Mustang Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Brake bleeding


To properly bleed the brakes, start with a couple of 8-ounce cans of fresh brake fluid. An unopened can has a long shelf life. An opened can should be discarded within a few weeks. Get the vehicle up in the air and remove all four wheels. Well, okay, you might be able to do this with the wheels on if you can swing a wrench on the bleeder valves.









Top off the reservoir with fresh fluid regularly as you bleed the system. Don\'t let it get more than half empty




So, your next task is to make sure the bleeder valves can be loosened. You\'ll need a box wrench that fits the bleeder bolt. A crescent wrench or Vise-Grip probably will just round off the bolt\'s flats. A little penetrating oil drizzled on the bolts the day before will help. So will some judicious tapping with a hammer to break up any corrosion. Loosen the bolts, but leave them closed.



If you can\'t turn the bleeders without breaking them off, you\'ll need to replace the brake calipers or wheel cylinders. See the above notation about penetrating oil and light hammer taps before applying enough torque to break these minuscule, hollow bolts.



Sneak into the kitchen and appropriate the small turkey baster. Remove the top to the master cylinder reservoir and suck out as much of the old squid ink as you can. Clean any sediment out of the reservoir with a clean, lint-free rag. Do not spill any brake fluid on any painted surfaces -- it will remove the paint pretty much immediately.



Get a piece of clear plastic tubing (aquarium tubing is fine, and it\'s cheap). Push one end of the tube over the brake bleeder bolt at the right rear of the car. Put the other end of the tube into a small, clear bottle with an inch or two of clean brake fluid in it. (This will keep air from being sucked back into the brake cylinder or caliper.) Put a piece of 1 x 4 lumber or some other spacer under the pedal to prevent the pedal from traveling too far when line pressure is released. Top off the master cylinder reservoir with fresh fluid and put the cover back on the reservoir. Fluid will squirt out of an open reservoir every time the pedal is released.



Cue the Helper


Your helper needs to be someone who can follow instructions exactly. He or she won\'t get dirty hands so you don\'t need to pull one of your pals away from the ballgame. A teenager in a white dress will do fine. Have your helper sit in the driver\'s seat and await your orders. Here\'s the drill: You say "down." He or she depresses the brake pedal with about the same amount of force needed to keep the car from rolling forward at a traffic light. Then your helper says "down" and keeps the pressure on. When you hear the call, warn your helper that the brake pedal is about to sink underfoot and to keep the pressure on constantly. Then crack the bleeder bolt a quarter-turn.











Got ABS? You may need to use a scan tool during the bleeding process to cycle the pump and valves.








Some of the old, contaminated fluid will trickle down the tubing into your bottle. When the trickle stops, close the bleeder. Then you say "up." Your helper says "up," and removes his or her foot from the pedal.



Repeat this process until fresh, clear fluid comes from the bleeder. Any out-of-sequence moves can suck air into the caliper. Yes, the end of the tubing is submerged in fluid, but air can travel past the threads on the bleeder bolt into the caliper if there\'s ever any negative pressure in the system while the bleeder is cracked.



Every half-dozen or so iterations, top off the reservoir with fresh fluid. Do not allow the reservoir to get more than half empty -- air can be sucked into the master cylinder unless the fluid level remains well above the bottom of the reservoir that feeds the cylinder.



Once clean fluid is coming out of the brake, snug the bleeder bolt and move your operation to the left rear wheel and start all over again. Next repeat the process with the right front and finally with the left front. Follow that with a few strokes of fresh fluid from all four, again. Don\'t forget to keep the reservoir topped off.

Dec 07, 2013 | 2003 Isuzu Ascender

2 Answers

How do I bleed the brakes?


well on vehicles with ABS you have to start at the furthest brake location, so the order in which to follow is Passenger rear, driver rear, passenger front, driver front. Really good investment to buy a one person bleeding tool, but if you have a friend with an hour to spare just get them to pump the brakes 3 times and than hold to the floor while you open the bleeder valve located on your calipers/drums, make sure they hold down until you open the valve for 1 sec to release pressure and hopefully all the nasty air, than they can release and just keep going till there is a steady stream of fluid, hope this helps.

Sep 06, 2011 | 2004 Ford Escape

2 Answers

How do you bleed the brakes on a 1996 pontiac sunfire se


right rear,left rear,right front,left front wheels.

Jan 19, 2011 | 1996 Pontiac Sunfire

1 Answer

I'm a mid-age woman w/a 94 DeVille that I want to change the brake fluid myself. How do I do that? Thank you!


BRAKE SYSTEM BLEEDING Diagonal Split System MASTER CYLINDER
  1. Refill the master cylinder reservoir.
  2. Push the plunger several times to force fluid into the piston.
  3. Continue pumping the plunger until the fluid is free of the air bubbles.
  4. Plug the outlet ports and install the master cylinder.
COMPLETE SYSTEM
  1. Fill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid. Check the level often during the procedure.
  2. Starting with the right rear wheel, remove the protective cap from the bleeder, if equipped, and place where it will not be lost. Clean the bleed screw. When bleeding the brakes, keep face away from the brake area. Spewing fluid may cause facial and/or visual damage. Do not allow brake fluid to spill on the vehicle's finish; it will remove the paint.
  3. If the system is empty, the most efficient way to get fluid down to the wheel is to loosen the bleeder about 1?2 - 3?4 turn, place a finger firmly over the bleeder and have a helper pump the brakes slowly until fluid comes out the bleeder. Once fluid is at the bleeder, close it before the pedal is released inside the vehicle. NOTE: If the pedal is pumped rapidly, the fluid will churn and create small air bubbles, which are difficult to remove from the system. These air bubbles will eventually congregate resulting in a spongy pedal.
  4. Once fluid has been pumped to the caliper or wheel cylinder, open the bleed screw again, have the helper press the brake pedal to the floor, lock the bleeder and have the helper slowly release the pedal. Wait 15 seconds and repeat the procedure (including the 15 second wait) until no more air comes out of the bleeder upon application of the brake pedal. Remember to close the bleeder before the pedal is released inside the vehicle each time the bleeder is opened. If not, air will be induced into the system.
  5. If a helper is not available, connect a small hose to the bleeder, place the end in a container of brake fluid and proceed to pump the pedal from inside the vehicle until no more air comes out the bleeder. The hose will prevent air from entering the system.
  6. Repeat the procedure on remaining wheel cylinders in order:
    1. Step 1: Left front
    2. Step 2: Left rear
    3. Step 3: Right front
  7. Hydraulic brake systems must be totally flushed if the fluid becomes contaminated with water, dirt or other corrosive chemicals. To flush, bleed the entire system until all fluid has been replaced with the correct type of new fluid.
  8. Install the bleeder cap(s) on the bleeder to keep dirt out. Always road test the vehicle after brake work of any kind is done.
Teves® Anti-lock Brake System FRONT BRAKES
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF throughout this procedure.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Remove the reservoir cap. Check and/or refill the master cylinder reservoir.
  4. Using the bleeder adapter tool, install it onto the fluid reservoir.
  5. Attach a diaphragm type pressure bleeder to the adapter and charge the bleeder to 20 psi.
  6. Using a transparent vinyl tube, connect it to either front wheel caliper and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  7. Open the bleeder valve 1?2 - 3?4 turn and purge the caliper until bubble free fluid flows from the hose.
  8. Tighten the bleeder screw and remove the bleeder equipment.
  9. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the pump to charge the accumulator.
  10. After bleeding, inspect the pedal for sponginess and the brake warning light for unbalanced pressure; if either of the conditions exist, repeat the bleeding procedure.
REAR BRAKES
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Check and/or refill the master cylinder reservoir.
  4. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the system to charge. NOTE: The pump will turn OFF when the system is charged.
  5. Using a transparent vinyl tube, connect it to a rear wheel bleeder valve and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  6. Open the bleeder valve 1?2 - 3?4 turn and slightly depress the brake pedal for at least 10 seconds or until air is removed from the brake system. Close the bleeder valve. NOTE: It is a good idea to check the fluid level several times during the bleeding operation. Remember, depressurize the system before checking the reservoir fluid.
  7. Repeat the bleeding procedure for the other rear wheel.
  8. After bleeding, inspect the pedal for sponginess and the brake warning light for unbalanced pressure; if either of the conditions exist, repeat the bleeding procedure.
Bosch® III Anti-lock Brake System
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Check and/or refill the reservoir to the full mark.
  4. Using a transparent vinyl hose, connect it to a pump bleeder screw and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  5. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  6. Move the transparent vinyl hose to the hydraulic unit bleeder screw. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  7. Disconnect the bleeder hose.
  8. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the hydraulic unit to charge; the pump should turn OFF after 30 seconds.
Bosch® 2U Anti-lock Brake System
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Check and/or refill the reservoir to the full mark.
  4. Using a transparent vinyl hose, connect it to a pump bleeder screw and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  5. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  6. Move the transparent vinyl hose to the hydraulic unit bleeder screw. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  7. Disconnect the bleeder hose.
  8. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the hydraulic unit to charge; the pump should turn OFF after 30 seconds.
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Sep 02, 2010 | 1994 Cadillac DeVille

3 Answers

Replacing brake pads on a 2000 Sephia


it is pushed in, you can use a proper tool from an automotive store or just use a large screw type clamp. make sure brake fluid cap is of when doing so.

Jul 02, 2010 | 2000 Kia Sephia

4 Answers

How do i release the brake caliper pistons to be able to fit new brake pads on a renault trafic 08 van. thank you


Renault trafic brake calipers on the front can be pushed in with a G-clamp, but rear calipers need to be wound in, if you look at the piston it has notches for a winding tool!

Jun 21, 2010 | Renault R5 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

The rear brakes calipers seem ceased up when trying to push plunger back to replace the brake pads.they don't want to seem to budge with brake clamp pressure.


If the calipers have two,or four notches in the piston of the calipers,then the pistons have to be turned in,one side turns left,and the other right,then they will go back,the auto parts store sells a cheap tool for this,that you use a 3/8 drive ratchet with,if this was helpful,please rate,and thank you

Jun 15, 2010 | 2008 Dodge Grand Caravan

1 Answer

How do you set up new rear calipers on a 1999 mk4 golf


Are the rear calipers already fitted? I will assume not 1) open the hood and locate the brake master cylinder and brake reservoir. Open the filler cap. Put a piece of polythene Supermarket bag will across the opening and tighted the filler cap over it. This will provide a vacuum seal to the reservoir to prevent too much brake fluid loss whilst working on the brakes. 2) Jack up one of the rear wheels and remove it. Loosen by half a turn the flexible brake hose union in the old caliper. Put a piece of towel on the ground beneath the brake assembly to catch any brake fluid. About midway along the hose pinch it closed. It is very important that you use something rounded on both sides to do this to prevent damaging the hose. A self clamping wrench has jaws that are too sharp for the job. If you have a couple of drill bits of about 8mm to 10mm in diameter that you can put one either side of the tube and then set the self clamping wrench to squeeze these on to the hose with moderate force; enough to prevent fluid loss. Slacken now the brake fluid bleed screw in the caliper. Put a broad blade screw driver between the disc and the face of the brake pad and twist to lever the caliper pistons back into the body of the caliper. As you do so brake fluid will be forced out the slackened bleed screw. Remove the brake pads when suitably slackened. Undo the two very large bolts that secure the caliper body to the hub assembly of the car and lift it free. The following process avoids the need of disturbing the top brake pipe union: taking the weight of the caliper in the hand it should be possible to unscrew it from the previously loosened end of the brake hose union end as if it were a massive nut. 3) Fitting the new caliper is matter of again taking its weight in the hand and screwing it on to the brake hose union end. Do it only hand tight initially. Put a light smear of copper ease grease on the back of each pad...do not contaminate the disc or pad face. Copperease between the caliper piston faces and the pad backs prevents brake squeal. Some new pads are supplied with an anti squeal compound to be smeared on the pad backs in which case the Copperease can be omitted. Slip the brake pads into the caliper body and also fit the bleed screw finger tight. Fit the caliper with pads over the disc the disc and insert the mounting bolts. Tighten the large mounting bolts to the specified torque (very very tight). Tighten the hose union end with a spanner and take off the improvised hose clamp. Tighten the bleed screw moderately. 4) Under the hood remove the polythene temporary seal from under the reservoir filler cap. Pump the brake pedal slowly until some resistance is felt. Check the fluid reservoir level and if low top it back up to max. 5)With a 'helper' do the following: have them press on the brake pedal. Undo the caliper bleed screw about a quarter of turn to let the air out and then re- tighten it again. Your helper should only now allow the brake pedal up slowly. Have them press on the pedal again. Again loosen off the bleed screw fractionally to expel air bubbles. Keep repeating this process until brake fluid emerges for some time with absolutely no sign of air bubbles. Your helper should also report that the brake pedal feels hard. Make sure the caliper pitons have extended and that the pads have been pressed hard onto the disc. Tighten the bleed screw securely. 6) Check the reservoir under the hood, the level may have gone down, if so top it up to the max line with brake fluid. 7) repeat steps 1 to 6 on the other side of the car.
As a final check ensure that no polythene has been left beneath the reservoir cap and that the cap is refitted. Check that all clamps have been removed, that brake hose unions, bleed screws and caliper mounting bolts are all tight and that the brake pedal action reaches a point of hard resistance when stood on. Any signs of springy softness in the brakes means that there is still air left in the system that will need further bleeding. Ensure everything is clean and that nothing is leaking. Job done

Apr 30, 2010 | 1999 Volkswagen Golf

2 Answers

How to compress caliper to fit new pads


Use a "C" clamp. Position on the piston and when you tighten it up it will compress the piston in the caliper. Remember to loosen the cap to your master cylinder, as you will be forcing brake fluid back into it. When you remove the "C" clamp the caliper will stay open long enough to align on the rotor.

Jul 14, 2009 | 2000 Volkswagen Beetle

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