Question about 1997 Ford Aspire

2 Answers

No start condition,weak ignition

I have a no start condition. Timing belt ok. I replaced distributor, crank sensor, ignition switch, computer, plugs, checked fuel pressure and injector pulse. Ignition spark is weak, and changes intensity sparatically. I am at a loss. I verified ignition and cam timing, checked spark at internal coil tower, bypassing cap and wires. Defeated fuel injection suspecting a rich condition and tried to make it hit on starting fluid also. I verified power and ground at distributor during cranking but could not test for other distibutor parameters.

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  • Master
  • 6,966 Answers

Hi and welcome to FixYa,

A couple of ideas you may want to explore, try and/or consider:

  • engines need only two factors to run air/fuel and spark (at the right moment);
  • fuel has been assured when you used starting fluid;
  • there is spark but weak, where? at the plugs or at the coil?
  • if spark weak at the plugs and strong at the coil, then rotor, distributor cap, or sparkplug wires;
  • if spark weak at the coil, then IGN B+12 or computer.
  • A noteworthy possibility is loose ground at the computer. There should be a common/ground wire from the computer. Pls ensure that there is no corrosion at the terminal/ground screw.
Additionally, you may want to check the all other ground wires and straps. If you would be using a voltmeter, place the black prod of the voltmeter on the - terminal of the battery itself. You may need to make use of an extra length of electrical wire to extend the meter's reach. Thereafter measure all IGN B+12 and their ground. If the ground shows a voltage reading. then you have just confirmed a loose ground.

Of course you could also make an additional ground running an electrical wire from the - terminal of the battery to where the supposed ground of the computer is.

Good luck and Thank you for using FixYa. Happy Holidays.

Posted on Dec 23, 2008

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  • Master
  • 405 Answers

Have you had your ignition coil checked?

Posted on Dec 23, 2008

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Let me also say that on my 97 pathfinder it ran good up until i replaced the water pump. then it wouldnt start. so i changed the spark plug wires and plugs. same thing...wants to start just wont fire up....


My first thought was the timing belt was not in time since you have to remove the belt to get to the pump.
The crank sensor is near the flywheel so it should not have been touched.
But timing should not affect the spark coming out of the coil.
It could be a problem with the resistor for the coil or something with the computer.
Did you also replace the cap and rotor when you changed the distributor ? Is the spark weak coming out of the coil ?
You may have to get a used shop manual from Ebay to get the test procedures and wiring diagram for the ignition system.

Feb 13, 2013 | 1997 Nissan Pathfinder

2 Answers

I have a 93 dodge caravan van that wont start it wants to turn over but won't.


For an engine to run, you need three things to happen inside the engine, compression, fuel and ignition, without any one of these components the engine will not run.
  • Compression - Engine compression caused by crankshaft rotation and pistons moving up and down inside the engine block. If the timing belt or timing chain fails it will cause the camshaft to become out of correlation with the crankshaft or allow the camshaft to stop rotating. Either of these conditions will cause the engine to lose compression and sometimes cause internal engine damage.
  • Fuel Delivery System - The fuel system includes: fuel pump, fuel injectors, pressure regulator, fuel filter and pressure lines. This system is used to supply fuel under pressure to the fuel injection system, the lack of fuel pressure or volume will cause the fuel delivery system to fail and the engine to stall or not start.
  • Ignition Spark Delivery System - The ignition system components include: spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor (if applicable), crankshaft angle sensor, camshaft angle sensor, ignition coil, ignition module, knock sensor and ECM (engine control module). The engine relies on the ignition spark to be delivered to the combustion camber at the correct time. If the ignition spark stops or is delivered at the wrong time the engine will not run or run poorly.
If Your Engine Cranks but Does Not Start Follow this Troubleshooting Guide
Most vehicles operate by the same principle; basic troubleshooting procedures apply to most cars.
  • Step 1: Anytime you have a problem with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) inspect all fuses using a test light and check the under hood power distribution center and under dash fuse panels. If all fuses test ok continue to the next step.
  • Step 2: To check for problems with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) and the fuses test ok a trouble code scan is needed to identify any system trouble. Use a simple scanner tool to retrieve trouble codes and see if they relate to the specific problem, like a crank angle sensor failure code. If the trouble code present does not pertain to the immediate problem like an EVAP code ignore it until a later time, after the car is running. The reason we repair non-related codes after the engine is running is because sometime false codes can be triggered by the engine not running. Once the engine is running again the code present might cycle and turn itself off. You might say "if the engine doesn't run shouldn't it have a trouble code?" Sometimes conditions occur that will not be detected by the computer, example: if the fuel pump fails the computer cannot detect the failure, so the engine doesn't start and the computer thinks everything is ok with no codes. If no trouble codes are present proceed to the next step.
poster.jpg?1292981965 Scan for Trouble Codes
  • Step 3: The spark plugs in your engine are used to ignite the compressed fuel air mixture. If the condition of the spark plugs are fouled by excessive fuel or carbon the engine will not start, backfire or run rough. Remove all spark plugs to inspect their condition. Please use this spark plug condition reference guide to see how the spark plugs are operating.
  • Step 4: Determine if the engine has compression, this can be done a number of ways but the most complete method is to perform a compression check. Remove the spark plugs and perform a compression test on one cylinder. If one cylinder has compression then the remaining cylinders usually will be close to the same. Crank the engine over about 5 seconds, normal compression readings should be between 125 psi and 160 psi on each cylinder. If no or little compression exists additional tests will be needed. The most common reason for an engine to lose compression is a timing belt or timing chain failure. If low or no compression exists remove the oil fill cap and observe camshaft rotation when the engine is cranked over. If no rotation exists the timing belt or chain has failed. If your engine has a timing belt and you cannot see the camshaft easily remove the upper bolts to the timing cover and gain visual access to the belt, recheck cam rotation by cranking the engine over. Sometimes a timing belt or chain can jump causing the camshaft to lose correlation with the crankshaft and therefore causing low compression. The best test for this condition is to remove the timing belt/chain cover and inspect timing marks. If the compression is ok proceed to next step.
  • Step 5: Test the ignition system output, ignition systems can vary in configuration but operate on the same principal. Ignition systems can consist of a coil, pick up coil, crank angle sensor, cam angle sensor, spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, ignition rotor and a distributor and any variations of these components. An ignition coil is a voltage stepper coil that transforms a low voltage (12 volts) signal into tens of thousands of volts needed to jump the gap of the spark plug. This coil is activated by an ignition module triggered by using the camshaft/crankshaft angle sensor; timing is adjusted by the ECM (computer).
    This primary electrical signal is generated by the ECM which calculates spark timing by using a variety of sensors including coolant temperature, mass air flow, and oxygen sensors. To perform a basic ignition output test you must have a test light and follow this ignition system output test video.
    crank_trigger_ignition_system.jpg
    Distributor less Ignition System Configuration
    Some ignition systems have a coil for each spark plug. This is called Direct Ignition (DI) system; there are no plug wires in this system just individually controlled ignition coils. The amount of coils or spark plugs depend on the number of cylinders the engine is designed with, example: four cylinders, six cylinders etc. To perform a basic ignition output test you must have a test light follow this ignition system output test video and substitute the ignition coil for the plug wire (Note: leave the coil trigger wires connected).
    coil_over_plug.jpg
    Coil Over Spark Plug
    If the ignition system test is weak or non-existent test the car fuses, both under hood power distribution center and the fuse panel under dash. This test is performed with a test light tool. The test light should illuminate on both sides of the fuse, if not the fuse has failed and needs to be replaced. If the fuses are ok a manufacturer specific repair procedure is required and an online auto repair manual is needed to continue. If the ignition system tests ok proceed to the next step.
poster.jpg?1292969781 Test Ignition System Video

Jan 12, 2011 | 1993 Dodge Caravan

3 Answers

The engine turnes but it wont start.


Free Auto Repair Advice by Professional Mechanics




Troubleshooting / Car Engine Cranks but Will Not Start / Engine Crank But Wont Start 2

* Why does my engine stall at idle?
* How do I change my spark plugs?
* Why does my engine stall?
* Why does the engine stall after replacing the battery?
* Why won't my engine crank over?
* How to retrieve trouble codes
* How to test fuel delivery system
* Engine cranks excessively
* Engine has excessive smoke
* Rapid ticking sounds when engine is cranked
* How to tune up your engine
* How to jump start your engine
* How to test an oxygen sensor
* How to open a car hood
* How a flywheel - flex plate works

Engine Cranks But Will Not Start

For an engine to run, you need three things to happen inside the engine, compression, fuel and ignition, without any one of these components the engine will not run. Follow the repair guide below:


Engine Configuration with Camshaft Operation

*

Compression - Engine compression caused by crankshaft rotation and pistons moving up and down inside the engine block. If the timing belt or timing chain fails it will cause the camshaft to become out of correlation with the crankshaft or allow the camshaft to stop rotating. Either of these conditions will cause the engine to lose compression and sometimes cause internal engine damage.
*

Fuel Delivery System - The fuel system includes: fuel pump, fuel injectors, pressure regulator, fuel filter and pressure lines. This system is used to supply fuel under pressure to the fuel injection system, the lack of fuel pressure or volume will cause the fuel delivery system to fail and the engine to stall or not start.
*

Ignition Spark Delivery System - The ignition system components include: spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor (if applicable), crankshaft angle sensor, camshaft angle sensor, ignition coil, ignition module, knock sensor and PCM (engine control module). The engine relies on the ignition spark to be delivered to the combustion camber at the correct time. If the ignition spark stops or is delivered at the wrong time the engine will not run or run poorly.

If your engine cranks but does not start follow this troubleshooting guide:
* Step 1 - Anytime you have a problem with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) inspect all fuses using a test light and check the under hood power distribution center and under dash fuse panels. If all fuses test ok continue to the next step.
* Step 2 - To check for problems with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) and the fuses test ok a trouble code scan is needed to identify any system trouble. Use a simple scanner tool to retrieve trouble codes and see if they relate to the specific problem, like a crank angle sensor failure code. If the trouble code present does not pertain to the immediate problem like an EVAP code ignore it until a later time, after the car is running. The reason we repair non-related codes after the engine is running is because sometime false codes can be triggered by the engine not running. Once the engine is running again the code present might cycle and turn itself off. You might say "if the engine doesn't run shouldn't it have a trouble code?" Sometimes conditions occur that will not be detected by the computer, example: if the fuel pump fails the computer cannot detect the failure, so the engine doesn't start and the computer thinks everything is ok with no codes. If no trouble codes are present proceed to the next step.
* Step 3 - The spark plugs in your engine are used to ignite the compressed fuel air mixture. If the condition of the spark plugs are fouled by excessive fuel or carbon the engine will not start, backfire or run rough. Remove all spark plugs to inspect their condition. Please use this spark plug condition reference guide to see how the spark plugs are operating.
* Step 4 - Determine if the engine has compression, this can be done a number of ways but the most complete method is to perform a compression check. Remove the spark plugs and perform a compression test on one cylinder. If one cylinder has compression then the remaining cylinders usually will be close to the same. Crank the engine over about 5 seconds, normal compression readings should be between 125 psi and 160 psi on each cylinder. If no or little compression exists additional tests will be needed. The most common reason for an engine to lose compression is a timing belt or timing chain failure. If low or no compression exists remove the oil fill cap and observe camshaft rotation when the engine is cranked over. If no rotation exists the timing belt or chain has failed. If your engine has a timing belt and you cannot see the camshaft easily remove the upper bolts to the timing cover and gain visual access to the belt, recheck cam rotation by cranking the engine over. Sometimes a timing belt or chain can jump causing the camshaft to lose correlation with the crankshaft and therefore causing low compression. The best test for this condition is to remove the timing belt/chain cover and inspect timing marks. If the compression is ok proceed to next step.
* Step 5 - Test the ignition system output, ignition systems can vary in configuration but operate on the same principal. Ignition systems can consist of a coil, pick up coil, crank angle sensor, cam angle sensor, spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, ignition rotor and a distributor and any variations of these components. An ignition coil is a voltage stepper coil that transforms a low voltage (12 volts) signal into tens of thousands of volts needed to jump the gap of the spark plug. This coil is activated by an ignition module triggered by using the camshaft/crankshaft angle sensor; timing is adjusted by the ECM (computer).

Hope helps (remember rated and comment this).

Aug 11, 2010 | 1999 Chevrolet Blazer

2 Answers

My daughter's 96 camry, 4 cylinder died while she was moving


Crank engine with distributor cap removed, is it turning?
(That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one)is it turning?
Broken timing belt or chain?

Are you getting power to the + positive side of the coil (small wires) with key on ? Hint; I use a needle pushed into the back of the plug so as not to damage the wiring.
If you have power then wiring from the ignition switch is OK. It usually is.
Hook your test light to the - negative side of the coil (one end on the - terminal and the other end on a ground). You should have power on the - side of the coil with the key on and engine off.
Crank the engine while watching the test light. Get a flashing signal at the test light when cranking?
If so and you have no spark the coil is likely dead.(don’t rely merely on resistance tests for a coil, a weak coil can test ok for resistance but still give no spark.It happens but is unusual. I learned this the hard way!)
No flashing signal?
Check continuity in all primary circuit wiring for opens.
If they are good,
It is time to check the pulse generator in the distributor. (That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one, if it doesn’t then the ECM or computer sends signal via the crankshaft position sensor and the camshaft position sensor)
With the engine in non-running condition connect your A/C voltmeter to the pair of wires at the pulse generator and crank the engine. You are looking for an A/C signal that makes 4-6 volts of A/C. Got this? If so the ignition module is dead or has a bad ground. If not (more likely) you have a dead pulse generator in the distributor.
If you have three wires in the distributor signal wire you have a Hall effect sensor. I forget how to test that one. (Chrysler stuff)


If this part of the primary ignition tests ok then check wiring to ECM pinouts for opens.Wiring tests ok.ECM as last resort.
Hope this helps...........

Oct 02, 2009 | 1996 Toyota Camry

2 Answers

I have no spark i replaced the spark plugs spark wires and the coil pack and still nothing my power distribution box is fine any ideas


Crank engine with distributor cap removed, is it turning?
(That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one)is it turning?
Broken timing belt or chain?

Are you getting power to the + positive side of the coil (small wires) with key on ? Hint; I use a needle pushed into the back of the plug so as not to damage the wiring.
If you have power then wiring from the ignition switch is OK. It usually is.
Hook your test light to the - negative side of the coil (one end on the - terminal and the other end on a ground). You should have power on the - side of the coil with the key on and engine off.
Crank the engine while watching the test light. Get a flashing signal at the test light when cranking?
If so and you have no spark the coil is likely dead. (don’t rely merely on resistance tests for a coil, a weak coil can test ok for resistance but still give no spark. It happens but is unusual. I learned this the hard way!)
No flashing signal?
Check continuity in all primary circuit wiring for opens.
If they are good,
It is time to check the pulse generator in the distributor. (That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one, if it doesn’t then the ECM or computer sends signal via the crankshaft position sensor and the camshaft position sensor)
With the engine in non-running condition connect your A/C voltmeter to the pair of wires at the pulse generator and crank the engine. You are looking for an A/C signal that makes 4-6 volts of A/C. Got this? If so the ignition module is dead or has a bad ground. If not (more likely) you have a dead pulse generator in the distributor.
If you have three wires in the distributor signal wire you have a Hall effect sensor. I forget how to test that one. (Chrysler stuff)


If this part of the primary ignition tests ok then check wiring to ECM pinouts for opens. Wiring tests ok. ECM as last resort.
Hope this helps...........

Sep 29, 2009 | 1992 Ford Ranger

3 Answers

Engine cranks but will not start


If Your Engine Cranks but Does Not Start Follow this Troubleshooting Guide
Vehicles operate by the same principle; basic troubleshooting procedure applies to most cars.
  • Step 1 - Anytime you have a problem with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS(supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) inspect all fuses using a test light and check the under hood power distribution center and under dash fuse panels. If all fuses test ok continue to the next step.
  • Step 2 - To check for problems with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) and the fuses test ok a trouble code scan is needed to identify any system trouble. Use a simple scanner tool to retrieve trouble codes and see if they relate to the specific problem, like a crank angle sensor failure code. If the trouble code present does not pertain to the immediate problem like an EVAP code ignore it until a later time, after the car is running. The reason we repair non-related codes after the engine is running is because sometime false codes can be triggered by the engine not running. Once the engine is running again the code present might cycle and turn itself off. You might say "if the engine doesn't run shouldn't it have a trouble code?" Sometimes conditions occur that will not be detected by the computer, example: if the fuel pump fails the computer cannot detect the failure, so the engine doesn't start and the computer thinks everything is ok with no codes. If no trouble codes are present proceed to the next step.
  • Step 3 - The spark plugs in your engine are used to ignite the compressed fuel air mixture. If the condition of the spark plugs are fouled by excessive fuel or carbon the engine will not start, backfire or run rough. Remove all spark plugs to inspect their condition. Please use this spark plug condition reference guide to see how the spark plugs are operating.
  • Step 4 - Determine if the engine has compression, this can be done a number of ways but the most complete method is to perform a compression check. Remove the spark plugs and perform a compression test on one cylinder. If one cylinder has compression then the remaining cylinders usually will be close to the same. Crank the engine over about 5 seconds, normal compression readings should be between 125 psi and 160 psi on each cylinder. If no or little compression exists additional tests will be needed. The most common reason for an engine to lose compression is a timing belt or timing chain failure. If low or no compression exists remove the oil fill cap and observe camshaft rotation when the engine is cranked over. If no rotation exists the timing belt or chain has failed. If your engine has a timing belt and you cannot see the camshaft easily remove the upper bolts to the timing cover and gain visual access to the belt, recheck cam rotation by cranking the engine over. Sometimes a timing belt or chain can jump causing the camshaft to lose correlation with the crankshaft and therefore causing low compression. The best test for this condition is to remove the timing belt/chain cover and inspect timing marks. If the compression is ok proceed to next step.
  • Step 5 - Test the ignition system output, ignition systems can vary in configuration but operate on the same principal. Ignition systems can consist of a coil, pick up coil, crank angle sensor, cam angle sensor, spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, ignition rotor and a distributor and any variations of these components. An ignition coil is a voltage stepper coil that transforms a low voltage (12 volts) signal into tens of thousands of volts needed to jump the gap of the spark plug. This coil is activated by an ignition module triggered by using the camshaft/crankshaft angle sensor; timing is adjusted by the ECM (computer).

Jul 19, 2009 | 2004 Nissan Altima

1 Answer

No spark in my 1999 silverado 4x4 4.8 engine


Crank engine with distributor cap removed, is it turning?
(That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one)is it turning?
Broken timing belt or chain?

Are you getting power to the + positive side of the coil (small wires) with key on ? Hint; I use a needle pushed into the back of the plug so as not to damage the wiring.
If you have power then wiring from the ignition switch is OK. It usually is.
Hook your test light to the - negative side of the coil (one end on the - terminal and the other end on a ground). You should have power on the - side of the coil with the key on and engine off.
Crank the engine while watching the test light. Get a flashing signal at the test light when cranking?
If so and you have no spark the coil is likely dead.(don’t rely merely on resistance tests for a coil, a weak coil can test ok for resistance but still give no spark.It happens but is unusual. I learned this the hard way!)
No flashing signal?
Check continuity in all primary circuit wiring for opens.
If they are good,
It is time to check the pulse generator in the distributor. (That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one, if it doesn’t then the ECM or computer sends signal via the crankshaft position sensor and the camshaft position sensor)
With the engine in non-running condition connect your A/C voltmeter to the pair of wires at the pulse generator and crank the engine. You are looking for an A/C signal that makes 4-6 volts of A/C. Got this? If so the ignition module is dead or has a bad ground. If not (more likely) you have a dead pulse generator in the distributor.
If you have three wires in the distributor signal wire you have a Hall effect sensor. I forget how to test that one. (Chrysler stuff)


If this part of the primary ignition tests ok then check wiring to ECM pinouts for opens.Wiring tests ok.ECM as last resort.
Hope this helps...........

Jun 01, 2009 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

97 saturn sl1 drove in fine, won't start just crank. no spark


Crank engine with distributor cap removed, is it turning?
(That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one)is it turning?
Broken timing belt or chain?

Are you getting power to the + positive side of the coil (small wires) with key on ? Hint; I use a needle pushed into the back of the plug so as not to damage the wiring.
If you have power then wiring from the ignition switch is OK. It usually is.
Hook your test light to the - negative side of the coil (one end on the - terminal and the other end on a ground). You should have power on the - side of the coil with the key on and engine off.
Crank the engine while watching the test light. Get a flashing signal at the test light when cranking?
If so and you have no spark the coil is likely dead.(don’t rely merely on resistance tests for a coil, a weak coil can test ok for resistance but still give no spark.It happens but is unusual. I learned this the hard way!)
No flashing signal?
Check continuity in all primary circuit wiring for opens.
If they are good,
It is time to check the pulse generator in the distributor. (That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one, if it doesn’t then the ECM or computer sends signal via the crankshaft position sensor and the camshaft position sensor)
With the engine in non-running condition connect your A/C voltmeter to the pair of wires at the pulse generator and crank the engine. You are looking for an A/C signal that makes 4-6 volts of A/C. Got this? If so the ignition module is dead or has a bad ground. If not (more likely) you have a dead pulse generator in the distributor.
If you have three wires in the distributor signal wire you have a Hall effect sensor. I forget how to test that one. (Chrysler stuff)


If this part of the primary ignition tests ok then check wiring to ECM pinouts for opens.Wiring tests ok.ECM as last resort.
Hope this helps...........

Jan 12, 2009 | 1997 Saturn SL

2 Answers

94 toyota camery no spark


I had the same problem recently but replacing the ignition Coil under the distributor (inside) solved the problem. Also replaced the distributor Cap and rotor at the same time.

Jul 18, 2008 | 1994 Toyota Camry

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