Question about 1997 Ford Explorer AWD

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Transmission slipping in all gears.

It was run in four wheel drive with different sized tires front to back. Does not move at all unless it's extremely cold outside and will move for the first minute or so after it's started until fluid is warm.

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4 wheel drive vehicles are desigined to run with equal size tyres front and back, if not severe stress is placed on the drivetrain, The transmission will most likely need overhaul, biut do not be surprised if you have transfer box faults and diff faults as well. Find a good transmission tech and get a quote.

Posted on Dec 23, 2008

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1 Answer

Do all wheel drive vehicals have to have all the same tread pattern?


It is preferable to have the same tread pattern all way round, now that said it is more important to have the same size in overall diameter on all four corners to stop the differentials and transmission running at different speeds front and back. Always have the same pattern across the axle.
If you have a selectable 2WD/4WD you could if you drive 90% of the time in 2WD get away with different sizes but it is not recommended. So back to the original question you should have the same pattern all round but there maybe a diameter difference in the tires with the different patterns and the different treads will wear at different speeds, of course front tires tend to wear quicker than back ones unless you burn out the backs a lot. That's why you rotate tires on 4WD vehicles.

Mar 13, 2014 | 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Front end noise


Assuming that you have already ruled out the brakes, severely worn engine mounts can transmit vibration and noises from the engine which are not normally heard. You don't say in what I see but is the vehicle two or four wheel drive. Since you mention CV half shafts I have to assume it is at least front wheel drive. If the vehicle is four wheel drive then there is a front differential with bearings in it that may be at fault. Have you done both sides when you say "hub assembly". Defective hub bearings will make grinding noises which will change tone or intensity when turning, accelerating or braking however the noise is usually fairly constant unless they are only just starting to fail. CV joints don't normally "grind" unless they are really bad. They usually make progressively worse "clicking" sounds or "clunking" sounds especially when turning hard, changing gears or direction of travel (forward to reverse and back again). Do you have non-stock tires/wheels? Larger/wider than factory spec tire sizes can rub the fender wells when the car is moving or turning. Another thing it could possibly be is the air dam below the front bumper. If it is loose it will push down in the airstream while the car is moving and rub on the ground.

May 12, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I just want to know the best drive to drive my 2007 Envoy in snow & ice on hills. My gears are 2up, Auto, 4up & 4dn. I drive in 2up, but today in the snow I put it in Auto, It drove pretty well. ...


The basic explanation of these gears are as follows.
2up/2wd is a basic two wheel drive setting where the vehicle will react as a rear wheel drive. In this gear the transmission will only distribute power to the two rear wheels(best for all around driving with clear road conditions and will give the best fuel efficiency).
4up/4wd is a high speed four wheel drive setting. in this gear the transmission will always distribute power to all four wheels and will allow you to drive at higher rates of speed( good for poor road conditions when ice and wet roads are a moderate risk).
4dwn/4lo is a low gear four wheel drive setting where again the transmission will distribute power to all four wheels but will limit you to a low rate of speed(good for really rough roads and severe weather or very poor traction conditions).
auto gear selection is basically a all wheel drive setting, where the transmission will use a primary setting of rear wheel drive gearing until the vehicle slips or looses traction on one of the drive traction. as soon as the transmission detects a difference in wheel speed between the two rear wheels, at which time the transmission locks up the front differential turning itself into a four wheel drive, until the wheels have regained traction and remain spinning at the same speed for a set amount of time, at which time it will then unlock the front differential at return to a rear wheel drive setting. this is a good all around gear but will cause you to get slightly less mpg/kpg then a 2up/2wd gear would. i hope this helps

Jan 09, 2011 | GMC Envoy Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

I bought a 1992 civic it had 2 different size tires in the front. There is a loud humming noise from the tranny it is a stick. Is this what caused it and how do i fix it?


Running 2 tire sizes on the front could/would damage the transmissions differential, depends on how long it was driven like that. It would require a trip to a tranny shop to fix it. But usually a loud humming noise comes from front wheel bearings going bad. On that car, the wheel bearing is pressed into the Hub, so if it is a bad bearing, it is still a trip to a shop for repair. Sorry I dont have any good news for you.

Nov 22, 2010 | 1992 Honda Civic

1 Answer

When i have my truck in 4 wheel drive and turn sharp it kinda bounces but when i have it in 2 it doesn't do that and i just want to know why....


The front differential/drive train have no way to slip in four wheel drive. When you make a tight turn the the front wheels travel a different distance than the rear wheels. on snow, ice, mud, or other off road conditions this isn't a problem because there is less friction for the tires and they just slip a little without much indication they are doing so. On dry pavement they cannot slip and cause the front drive train to bind up and eventually hop.

By the way that is not very good for the 4X4 drive train in general so unless you driving a straight line on dry pavement I wouldn't recommend using the 4x4.

In two wheel drive the front drive drain can move independent of the rear drive train so tight turns are not a problem.

Oct 13, 2010 | 1991 Ford F150

1 Answer

How does the four wheel drive on my jeep work or lock in?


If you have a CJ or Cherokee, when you move the 4x4 lever, it engages the transfer case which then transmits power to the front as well as the rear wheels. For most (99%) of all four wheel use, you use the front position on the shifter one notch behind the two wheel drive setting. Use 4 low only for pulling vehicles out of mud etc and don't drive in that range. If it sticks in 4wd after disengaging it, usually backing up about twenty feet will help.
If you have a Grand Cherokee, the 4x4 usually is a quadratrack unit. That one stays engaged but only goes into 4wd mode when the rear wheels begin to slip. (by itself). Rules for using low are the same.
It is very important to run the exact same size and style tires on any 4x4. It is mandatory on quadratrack units. Use of odd sized tires can cause driveline damage.
There are variations on different year vehicles but the basics remain the same.

Sep 01, 2010 | Jeep Cherokee Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

When i engage the four wheel drive on my 1988 ford it is rough


there should be a tag on your differentials front and rear clean them up and check to see if the ratios match

Nov 19, 2009 | 1988 Ford Bronco

6 Answers

Tire Replacement


That is absolutely and totally wrong. They want your money. Go to another tire place and have them replace only the tire that is bad. If your other 3 tires are bald or mis-sized, replace them also but it will not affect the tranny.

Apr 13, 2009 | 1999 Ford Explorer

1 Answer

What wrong?


Hi Axer,

The Range Rovers have permanently engaged Four Wheel Drive. If the tires are different sizes, they're spinning at different rates. Or trying to.

If you were off-road, it wouldn't matter too much, but on paved road, where the tires tend to grip not slip, these different rates subject a locked drive train to tremendous stress. This can bind up the gearing in the transfer case. Hopefully after only ten minutes, no permanent damage was done.

You can relieve this stress by jacking one end completely off the ground. Front or back. As the tires lose their grip on the road, you should see them spin slightly. That's good news. Once released you should be able to move again.

While it's in the air, you should probably put the original size tires back on. So choose which end to jack accordingly.

Comment me back to let me know how it goes.
Good luck

Mike



Jan 24, 2009 | 1995 Land Rover Range Rover

1 Answer

1993 jeep grand cherokee laredo 4 wheel drive


I'm not absolutely sure on the tire size for the jeep itself, but I think they are 225/65/R15's. Not absolutely sure.

As for the noise, from your explanation, it sounds like the transfer case is under a heavy bind. Take it off of the road in some grass or dirt and then move it forward a few feet then simply hit reverse. Don't move much maybe an inch and it may release the bind. Once you get the bind off the transfer case, it should slip out of 4wd, unless there is damage in the case/shifter itself.

When operating four wheel drives, with tires of different sizes it causes extreme stress on the gearing in the transfer case. Larger tires don't turn the axles as much as smaller tires. So, this causes stress in the driveline as the front is actually turning slower then the rear. In turn, this will put so much pressure on the gears that it could cause damage and the shifting mechanism will not work correctly to pull it out of 4wd engagement.

Try those ideas, and see if you can get it out of 4WD. Definitely put four tires on the jeep that are all the same size. This will keep you from having excessive stress on the transfer case and gearing therein.

I hope this helps out buddy.

Sep 21, 2008 | 1993 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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