Question about 2005 Mercedes-Benz Mercedes Benz E320 Cdi

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Left xenon ligth is not out... but has changed color from the cool blue ... to a slight pinkish color? is it the bulb or something else

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Xenon bulb has two electrodes and they will erode away if the bulb is old. The color that you see is probaby the erotion of the electrode mixed with the inert gas and metal halide. All HID bulb will change color over time. For example a brand new 4300K yellowish bulb will eventually turn into a 5000k color bulb which is purple and white

If your bulb is not too old but the colour has changed then that means your bulb has premature problem. Frequently switching on and off the bulb can age the bulb by up to 50%.

I strongly recommended to change both bulbs, so they have even color.

Cheers

Posted on Jun 24, 2009

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