Question about 2000 Toyota Camry

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EXHAUST LEAK INTO COOLING SYSTEM?

ENGINE WILL BEGIN TO OVERHEAT WHEN IT HITS ABOUT 75-90 mph. THE HOSES FROM RADIATOR, TO WHERE THE HEAD GASKET IS, GET REALLY HARD, BUT WHEN I REMOVE THE RADIATOR CAP PRESSURE IS RELEASED AND HOSES GO BACK TO MORE NORMAL. I DON'T SEE SMOKE COMING OUT OF EXHAUST PIPE. I'VE CHANGED THE THERMOSTAT AND NO DIFFERENCE. THE TEMP GAUGE GOES DOWN A FEW SECONDS AFTER I TAKE MY FOOT OFF THE GAS. DO I NEED TO HAVE HEAD GASKET CHANGED?

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I assume its a 4 cyl?? will this car ever overheat if just sitting idle? when it begins to overheat, hows the heat in the cab? sounds like maybe the radiator is partially clogged or restricted somehow. i would change the radiator cap and make sure the overflow is set to proper level. (incl. radiator level) i wouldnt jump to headgasket just yet, they are pretty durable from what ive seen

Posted on Dec 16, 2008

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  • Toyota Master
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Sounds like you have a partially plugged radiator. Try flushing it out and see if the problem changes at all. When flushing, force water to flow backwards from the normal flow direction this usually frees up some of the debris built up on the core passage ends. If you must, remove the radiator to do this. Depending on accessability, I usually just tape up the end of a garden hose and put it into the outlet on the radiator (but have gotten as radical as using a pool pump and lime out to do this job!
Is there any coolant in the engine oil or trans?

Posted on Dec 16, 2008

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2001 hyundai elantra heater only blows cold air,it overheats within a block of driving then car wont start for a couple hours what is the problem


Blocked cooling system most likely a stuck thermostat. The coolant is not circulation therefore not getting to heater core. Replace thermostat and it should be fixed

Apr 24, 2016 | Hyundai Cars & Trucks

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Still smoke water exiting exhaust.did gaskets on both rocket covers new oiln&filter


From what you have described you have radiator coolant leaking into the engine cylinders.

This will not be rectified by changing the gaskets on the rocker covers. That just stops engine oil leaking out from around the edges of the rocker covers.

The coolant will be leaking internally due to a failed cylinder head gasket and/or a crack in the cylinder head(s) and/or even a crack in the engine block. You will most likely also have combustion gasses leaking into the cooling system passages from one or more cylinders. I expect there will also be some coolant finding its way into the engine oil.

If you have allowed the radiator coolant to run low and hence for the engine to overheat at any stage that will cause the problems you have now.

You need to have tests run to check if you have a failed head gasket(s) and in that event the cylinder heads will need to be removed, the head gaskets replaced and, while removed, the heads checked for cracks, checked for any warping and overall condition. The engine block will also need to be checked.
If you run a compression test on all cylinders you will likely see the compression lower than spec in a number of them. A leak down test on each cylinder will show which cylinders have coolant leaking into them(and combustion gasses leaking out into the cooling system) and certainly confirm the need to remove the cylinder heads.

If you start the engine cold with the radiator cap removed, once the coolant has warmed and begins flowing from the engine via the top radiator hose to the radiator you will see bubbles in the coolant if there are combustion gasses leaking into the cooling system as described. This is an indication, (because the bubbles can also be air not properly bled out of the cooling system) but you still need to run a leak down test.

You need to have the problem checked out immediately as you do not want to be running the engine in this condition. Make sure you also check the level of the coolant in the cooling system and top it up when the engine is cool if not full. Coolant can escape quickly under normal cooling system pressure when the engine is running.

Apr 17, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Why did my 320d, E46, water hose burst?


It could be due to age. Split hoses aren't uncommon.
However, it could be due to either a radiator blockage or a cylinder head problem - which is allowing exhaust gases to find their way into the cooling system via a leaking head gasket. When this happens the cooling system becomes pressurised by the exhaust gases.

To check if your radiator is blocked, run the engine until it is hot. The coolant goes into the radiator via the top hose and into the engine through the bottom hose.

Carefully feel the top and bottom hose. If the bottom hose feels much cooler than the top hose, then that indicates a radiator blockage. If the bottom hose feels 'flat' and 'squashed' that is another indicator - though it also can point to head gasket problems.

To check if there are head gasket problems, first check the oil on the dipstick. If it is a 'creamy sludge' then that indicates coolant has found its way into the lubricating system via a leaking head gasket.

Also remove the cap from the raditor expansion tank (where you fill it with coolant/water). Is there any sign of oil/sludge in the expansion tank? Another sign of head gasket problems.

With a COLD engine, remove the cap from the radiator expansion tank and then fire the engine up. Watch the coolant as the engine ticks over ... at first bubbles will appear as air in the coolant escapes. The bubbles should stop after a few moments as the engine warms. If the bubbles continue -or there is 'violent bubbling' that's teling you there is a head gasket problem.

I presume that your car hasn't been overheating or 'running rough' at times, as you haven't mentioned that. Overheating and 'running rough' can also be symptoms of head gasket problems.

All being well .. no radiator blockage or apparent head gasket problems, it is more than likely that the hose burst due to age/mileage.

Aug 16, 2010 | 2000 BMW 3 Series

2 Answers

Car is still over heating, have replaced heat sensor switch,fuel sensor switch,fuel air sensor and flushed the radiator.


Have you changed out the thermostat and checked for exhaust blow by from a head gasket leak? One quick way to check for blow by would be if you start the car with the cap off on the radiator and see if antifreeze begins to rise up in the radiator before the engine warms up. Exhaust leaking into the water jacket will bubble up through the radiator. This hot exhaust gas will cause you to overheat. A stuck thermostat will keep the antifreeze from ever reaching the radiator to cool down also causing you to overheat.

Jun 06, 2010 | 1996 Chevrolet Corsica

1 Answer

Engine overheats


Uh oh...You may have the Ventures infamous head gasket/intake manifold gasket failure. First check your coolant level,not just in the bottle but in the radiator itself. Change your radiator cap. Make sure the rubber hose leading from the overflow tank to the radiator neck is not kinked and allows water to flow in both directions, not just into the bottle under pressure. Dex-Cool is very sensitive to exposure to air and tends to clog the system if air is allowed in. If you are low in coolant, flush out the system and from my experience I would change over to good old green coolant and change it every 30-40K. If your coolant level isn't low you may have a stuck thermostat (located sideways under the throttle body) or head gasket problem. A cheap check for a head gasket leak thats still small is to open up the radiator on the engine while its cold and start it up. A bad head gasket will send exhaust into the water jacket which will force the water to bubble up the radiator neck before the engine is even warm. A bad intake manifold will burn antifreeze out your exhaust and drain your radiator without any sign of a leak.

May 27, 2010 | 2001 Chevrolet Venture

4 Answers

Loosing coolant no visible leaks about 1/2 gallon every 100 miles


How To Find & Fix Coolant Leaks

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WHERE COOLANT LEAKS OCCUR
Coolant leaks can occur anywhere in the cooling system. Nine out of ten times, coolant leaks are easy to find because the coolant can be seen dripping, spraying, seeping or bubbling from the leaky component. Open the hood and visually inspect the engine and cooling system for any sign of liquid leaking from the engine, radiator or hoses. The color of the coolant may be green, orange or yellow depending on the type of antifreeze in the system. The most common places where coolant may be leaking are:
Water pump -- A bad shaft seal will allow coolant to dribble out of the vent hole just under the water pump pulley shaft. If the water pump is a two-piece unit with a backing plate, the gasket between the housing and back cover may be leaking. The gasket or o-ring that seals the pump to the engine front cover on cover-mounted water pumps can also leak coolant. Look for stains, discoloration or liquid coolant on the outside of the water pump or engine.

Radiator -- Radiators can develop leaks around upper or loser hose connections as a result of vibration. The seams where the core is mated to the end tanks is another place where leaks frequently develop, especially on aluminum radiators with plastic end tanks. On copper/brass radiators, leaks typically occur where the cooling tubes in the core are connected or soldered to the core headers. The core itself is also vulnerable to stone damage. Internal corrosion caused by old coolant that has never been changed can also eat through the metal in the radiator, causing it to leak.

Most cooling systems today are designed to operate at 8 to 14 psi. If the radiator can't hold pressure, your engine will overheat and lose coolant.

Hoses -- Cracks, pinholes or splits in a radiator hose or heater hose will leak coolant. A hose leak will usually send a stream of hot coolant spraying out of the hose. A corroded hose connection or a loose or damaged hose clamp may also allow coolant to leak from the end of a hose. Sometimes the leak may only occur once the hose gets hot and the pinhole or crack opens up.

Freeze plugs -- These are the casting plugs or expansion plugs in the sides of the engine block and/or cylinder head. The flat steel plugs corroded from the inside out, and may develop leaks that are hard to see because of the plug's location behind the exhaust manifold, engine mount or other engine accessories. On V6 and V8 blocks, the plugs are most easily inspected from underneath the vehicle.

Heater Core -- The heater core is located inside the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) unit under the dash. It is out of sight so you cannot see a leak directly. But if the heater core is leaking (or a hose connection to the heater core is leaking), coolant will be seeping out of the bottom of the HVAC unit and dripping on the floor inside the passenger compartment. Look for stains or wet spots on the bottom of the plastic HVAC case, or on the passenger side floor.

Intake Manifold gasket -- The gasket that seals the intake manifold to the cylinder heads may leak and allow coolant to enter the intake port, crankcase or dribble down the outside of the engine. Some engines such as General Motors 3.1L and 3.4L V6 engines as well as 4.3L, 5.0L and 5.7L V8s are notorious for leaky intake manifold gaskets. The intake manifold gaskets on these engines are plastic and often fail at 50,000 to 80,000 miles. Other troublesome applications include the intake manifold gaskets on Buick 3800 V6 and Ford 4.0L V6 engines.

INTERNAL COOLANT LEAKS
There are the worst kind of coolant leaks for two reasons. One is that they are impossible to see because they are hidden inside the engine. The other is that internal coolant leaks can be very expensive to repair.

Bad head gasket --Internal coolant leaks are most often due to a bad head gasket. The head gasket may leak coolant into a cylinder, or into the crankcase. Coolant leaks into the crankcase dilute the oil and can damage the bearings in your engine. A head gasket leaking coolant into a cylinder can foul the spark plug, and create a lot of white smoke in the exhaust. Adding sealer to the cooling system may plug the leak if it is not too bad, but eventually the head gasket will have to be replaced.

If you suspect a head gasket leak, have the cooling system pressure tested. If it fails to hold pressure, there is an internal leak. A "block tester" can also be used to diagnose a leaky head gasket. This device draws air from the cooling system into a chamber that contains a special blue colored leak detection liquid. Combustion gases will react with the liquid and cause it to change color from blue to green if the head gasket is leaking.

Head gasket failures are often the result of engine overheating (which may have occurred because of a coolant leak elsewhere in the cooling system, a bad thermostat, or an electric cooling fan not working). When the engine overheats, thermal expansion can crush and damage portions of the head gasket. This damaged areas may then start to leak combustion pressure and/or coolant.

Cracked Head or Block -- Internal coolant leaks can also occur if the cylinder head or engine block has a crack in a cooling jacket. A combustion chamber leak in the cylinder head or block will leak coolant into the cylinder. This dilutes the oil on the cylinder walls and can damage the piston and rings. If the coolant contains silicates (conventional green antifreeze), it can also foul the oxygen sensor and catalytic converter. If enough coolant leaks into the cylinder (as when the engine is sitting overnight), it may even hydro-lock the engine and prevent it from cranking when you try to start it. Internal leaks such as these can be diagnosed by pressure testing the cooling system or using a block checker.

A coolant leak into the crankcase is also bad news because it can damage the bearings. Coolant leaking into the crankcase will make the oil level on the dipstick appear to be higher than normal. The oil may also appear frothy, muddy or discolored because of the coolant contamination.

Leaky ATF oil cooler -- Internal coolant leakage can also occur in the automatic transmission fluid oil cooler inside the radiator. On most vehicles with automatic transmissions, ATF is routed through an oil cooler inside the radiator. If the tubing leaks, coolant can enter the transmission lines, contaminate the fluid and ruin the transmission. Red or brown drops of oil in the coolant would be a symptom of such a leak. Because the oil cooler is inside the radiator, the radiator must be replaced to eliminate the problem. The transmission fluid should also be changed.

continue...

Mar 12, 2010 | 1998 Oldsmobile 88

1 Answer

Loosing antifreeze


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WHERE COOLANT LEAKS OCCUR
Coolant leaks can occur anywhere in the cooling system. Nine out of ten times, coolant leaks are easy to find because the coolant can be seen dripping, spraying, seeping or bubbling from the leaky component. Open the hood and visually inspect the engine and cooling system for any sign of liquid leaking from the engine, radiator or hoses. The color of the coolant may be green, orange or yellow depending on the type of antifreeze in the system. The most common places where coolant may be leaking are:
Water pump -- A bad shaft seal will allow coolant to dribble out of the vent hole just under the water pump pulley shaft. If the water pump is a two-piece unit with a backing plate, the gasket between the housing and back cover may be leaking. The gasket or o-ring that seals the pump to the engine front cover on cover-mounted water pumps can also leak coolant. Look for stains, discoloration or liquid coolant on the outside of the water pump or engine.

Radiator -- Radiators can develop leaks around upper or loser hose connections as a result of vibration. The seams where the core is mated to the end tanks is another place where leaks frequently develop, especially on aluminum radiators with plastic end tanks. On copper/brass radiators, leaks typically occur where the cooling tubes in the core are connected or soldered to the core headers. The core itself is also vulnerable to stone damage. Internal corrosion caused by old coolant that has never been changed can also eat through the metal in the radiator, causing it to leak.

Most cooling systems today are designed to operate at 8 to 14 psi. If the radiator can't hold pressure, your engine will overheat and lose coolant.

Hoses -- Cracks, pinholes or splits in a radiator hose or heater hose will leak coolant. A hose leak will usually send a stream of hot coolant spraying out of the hose. A corroded hose connection or a loose or damaged hose clamp may also allow coolant to leak from the end of a hose. Sometimes the leak may only occur once the hose gets hot and the pinhole or crack opens up.

Freeze plugs -- These are the casting plugs or expansion plugs in the sides of the engine block and/or cylinder head. The flat steel plugs corroded from the inside out, and may develop leaks that are hard to see because of the plug's location behind the exhaust manifold, engine mount or other engine accessories. On V6 and V8 blocks, the plugs are most easily inspected from underneath the vehicle.

Heater Core -- The heater core is located inside the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) unit under the dash. It is out of sight so you cannot see a leak directly. But if the heater core is leaking (or a hose connection to the heater core is leaking), coolant will be seeping out of the bottom of the HVAC unit and dripping on the floor inside the passenger compartment. Look for stains or wet spots on the bottom of the plastic HVAC case, or on the passenger side floor.

Intake Manifold gasket -- The gasket that seals the intake manifold to the cylinder heads may leak and allow coolant to enter the intake port, crankcase or dribble down the outside of the engine. Some engines such as General Motors 3.1L and 3.4L V6 engines as well as 4.3L, 5.0L and 5.7L V8s are notorious for leaky intake manifold gaskets. The intake manifold gaskets on these engines are plastic and often fail at 50,000 to 80,000 miles. Other troublesome applications include the intake manifold gaskets on Buick 3800 V6 and Ford 4.0L V6 engines.

INTERNAL COOLANT LEAKS
There are the worst kind of coolant leaks for two reasons. One is that they are impossible to see because they are hidden inside the engine. The other is that internal coolant leaks can be very expensive to repair.

Bad head gasket --Internal coolant leaks are most often due to a bad head gasket. The head gasket may leak coolant into a cylinder, or into the crankcase. Coolant leaks into the crankcase dilute the oil and can damage the bearings in your engine. A head gasket leaking coolant into a cylinder can foul the spark plug, and create a lot of white smoke in the exhaust. Adding sealer to the cooling system may plug the leak if it is not too bad, but eventually the head gasket will have to be replaced.

If you suspect a head gasket leak, have the cooling system pressure tested. If it fails to hold pressure, there is an internal leak. A "block tester" can also be used to diagnose a leaky head gasket. This device draws air from the cooling system into a chamber that contains a special blue colored leak detection liquid. Combustion gases will react with the liquid and cause it to change color from blue to green if the head gasket is leaking.

Head gasket failures are often the result of engine overheating (which may have occurred because of a coolant leak elsewhere in the cooling system, a bad thermostat, or an electric cooling fan not working). When the engine overheats, thermal expansion can crush and damage portions of the head gasket. This damaged areas may then start to leak combustion pressure and/or coolant.

Cracked Head or Block -- Internal coolant leaks can also occur if the cylinder head or engine block has a crack in a cooling jacket. A combustion chamber leak in the cylinder head or block will leak coolant into the cylinder. This dilutes the oil on the cylinder walls and can damage the piston and rings. If the coolant contains silicates (conventional green antifreeze), it can also foul the oxygen sensor and catalytic converter. If enough coolant leaks into the cylinder (as when the engine is sitting overnight), it may even hydro-lock the engine and prevent it from cranking when you try to start it. Internal leaks such as these can be diagnosed by pressure testing the cooling system or using a block checker.

A coolant leak into the crankcase is also bad news because it can damage the bearings. Coolant leaking into the crankcase will make the oil level on the dipstick appear to be higher than normal. The oil may also appear frothy, muddy or discolored because of the coolant contamination.

Leaky ATF oil cooler -- Internal coolant leakage can also occur in the automatic transmission fluid oil cooler inside the radiator. On most vehicles with automatic transmissions, ATF is routed through an oil cooler inside the radiator. If the tubing leaks, coolant can enter the transmission lines, contaminate the fluid and ruin the transmission. Red or brown drops of oil in the coolant would be a symptom of such a leak. Because the oil cooler is inside the radiator, the radiator must be replaced to eliminate the problem. The transmission fluid should also be changed.

continue..

Mar 12, 2010 | 2007 Hummer H3X

1 Answer

2001 Pontiac Sunfire is dumping antifreeze out the overflow. Could it be something other than thermostat?


Common causes include: leak from engine, hoses, etc. causing overheat due to low coolant, electric fan not coming on, internally obstructed radiator, external obstruction to radiator (leaves paper. plastic bag on front of radiator of stuck between radiator and A/C condenser), bad thermostat and last, blown head gasket. Proper testing for any and all these conditions will give you the answer you are looking for. If the antifreeze is overflowing without any overheat, it can either be over-full, or in some cases, a head gasket can do this by filling the cooling system with exhaust and driving the coolant out.

Aug 15, 2009 | 2001 Pontiac Sunfire

3 Answers

1965 Ford Mustang 289 overheats at highway speed


your raidator fins my be clogged and also you shouldnt have a clutch fan on it it should be a locked fan!!!! for more air flow!!!

Apr 16, 2009 | 1965 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

Overheating


There's many causes of overheating (on all cars..).
The first and most obvious thing I would do after checking the coolant level in the radiator expansion tank was at the maximum level, would be to check for coolant leaks while the engine is running with a 'few revs' on a warm engine.

Hoses can split internally and also become soft and collapse internally through age. When this happens the hose becomes blocked and prevents the coolant from passing through easily. If a hose feels 'soggy'/soft and is easily squeezed flat by hand, it's suspect.

Coolant can also leak from the heater hoses, the heater unit, the bearings/seal on the water pump and of course the radiator. Nor is it always easy to see a leak let alone find it. If the in-car heater unit is leaking the carpets may be wet at times and sometimes, the windows may mist up when the car is standing - this is the coolant condensing on the interior of the glass.

Ok... you can't see any leaks while the engine is running. Is the car losing coolant when it stands? Or is it losing coolant when the engine is running? ( a split hose may only leak when it is pressurised with warm coolant) Or is it just losing coolant when it overheats?

Remove the cap from the radiator expansion tank when the engine is cold. Make sure that the water level is at maximum. Leave the expansion tank cap off. Leave the car standing overnight and next morning look at the coolant level. If it has dropped there's probably an unidentified leak somewhere. If the coolant level hasn't dropped, it points towards a problem that is caused when the engine runs.

With the expansion tank cap still off (get a flashlight to help you) start the engine and peek into the expansion tank. Watch what happens to the coolant (though do keep your face out of harm's way). As the coolant begins to circulate air bubbles will probably appear within the coolant. This is quite normal - air is 'bleeding out' of the coolant as it circulates. The air bubbles should stop after a couple of minutes.

As the coolant warms it will rise up in the expansion tank (keep your face out of the way ..). If the air bubbles continually appear or, there's a constant and continual stream of bubbles or a 'violent bubbling' then this may point to problems with a warped/cracked cylinder head or leaking head gasket (or both).

A defective cylinder head/gasket can allow exhaust gasses to be pumped into the water jacket (the coolant system) simply by the compression action of the pistons. Just like a hypodermic needle can inject air into your bloodstream. When this happens - pressurised exhaust gasses being forced into the cooling system - the cooling system itself becomes pressurised.

The coolant itself can find its way into the cylinders where it is vapourized and pumped out of the exhaust along with the exhaust gases. If you can't find any leaks - the missing coolant may be going out of the exhaust as steam (though you may not see any steam as such). A classic sign of cylinder head/gasket problems is overheating. Check your oil - if there's a yellowish/creamy mayonnaise/sludge that's another sign of head problems. The sludge is caused by coolant finding its way into the oil.

No leaks, no bubbling expansion tank - and if you're happy that there isn't a head/gasket problem, turn your attention to the radiator, thermostat and water pump.

With age, cooling fins on the radiator can corrode and crumble away, reducing its cooling ability. Whilst coolant still passes through the radiator it isn't being cooled sufficiently. Check the condition of your radiator. Radiators can also suffer from an internal blockage. With a warm engine that is switched OFF, feel the top radiator hose - it will be hot. Then feel the bottom radiator hose. If the bottom hose is cold it indicates that coolant is not finding its way down/being circulated maybe due to a radiator blockage or failed thermostat. Flushing may cure blockages.

A thermostat can fail in the 'closed' position. When this happens coolant is prevented from getting into the radiator via the top hose. The coolant in the block then overheats causing the temperature gauge to hit red. The thermostat is located (usually - it depends on make/model variations) on the cylinder head where the top radiator hose joins. They're very easy and cheap to replace.

The water pump can leak water when the bearings/seal fail. Coolant that slowly drips onto a warm engine soon evaporates making detection difficult. Way back, some water pumps had plastic impellers (perhaps they still do). The plastic vanes on the impellers used to wear away with age and use, leaving a spindle spinning uselessly in the coolant - not pumping it. Think of an airplane with a propeller. If the propeller blades wore away the 'nose cone' would just spin uselessly and no air would get moved ..

Before jumping to any conclusions and replacing parts unnecessarily, get a workshop to look at the car. A workshop will be able to test the coolant for exhaust contaminants within minutes (or pressure test the coolant system. If there's contaminants present - there's a head problem. No contaminants present - the fault lies elsewhere.

Back to the cylinder head:
It's a 2-3 day job to do the work yourself. A cylinder head must be skimmed prior to refitting. Refitting an unskimmed cylinder head back onto an engine cures nothing.

Years ago, here in the UK, there was a liquid additive called 'head weld' (and one for the radiator called 'radweld') which provided a TEMPORARY get-you-home fix. Head-weld was a liquid added to the coolant system. It contained fine particles in suspension ... these particles were carried to the crack/leak in the cylinder head and formed a 'dam' that was held in place by the water pressure until they (the particles) hardened.

Recently I noticed an advert for a product called 'steelseal' - here in the UK. The advertising blurb claims that it uses new technology without particles to form a permanent fix for cylinder heads/gaskets. It's a clear liquid that you just pour into the cooling system and then run the engine until its fixed. I've never tried it. At around 45 dollars a bottle it isn't cheap, though if it does what is claimed then it's a hell of a lot cheaper than having a cylinder head/gasket fixed. No doubt there are similar products on the shelves of car accessory and parts shops near you.







Aug 12, 2008 | 1992 Volvo 960

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