Question about 1999 Ford Taurus

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Heat/ cool fan doesn't turn on -- 1999 Tarus Wagon

When I turn the knob to turn on the heat, nothing happens. The high/ low knob has been broken for a while, I suspect the Heat, Defrost, AC knob has also broken.

How do you remove that darned oval panel to look at the dials, or radio.

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Radio has 4 holes in front cover 2cloths hangers work well when cut to fit in holesinsert about 3 inches or until you feel springs release gently tug on hangers assembly comes out of dash
save time check heater relay underhood fuse panel

Posted on Dec 12, 2008

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Why is the temperature light keep coming on and the gauge keep going up and down?


Temperature Warning Light is on Inspection Service How this system works: With the exception of older, air-cooled vehicles, cars rely on a liquid called coolant (or antifreeze) to keep the engine at an optimal temperature. Coolant is a mixture of water and ethylene glycol, and it circulates around the engine block and absorbs excess heat, which keeps the engine from overheating. The coolant converts that heat to air in the radiator, and then the air is emitted, at which time the coolant is ready to absorb more heat. Without coolant, the engine would quickly ruin itself with its own heat production. Common reasons for this to happen:
  • Coolant is low or weak: The most common culprit when an engine overheats is low or weak coolant. If your car doesn't have enough coolant, then it can't absorb enough heat. While your car will naturally lose small amounts of coolant over the years, a leak is the most likely cause of low coolant levels.The proper ratio of coolant to water can also get distorted, resulting in a problem. Too little or even too much antifreeze can dramatically lower the boiling point of the coolant. A proper ratio of antifreeze to water is 50/50 to 60/40, depending on the vehicle.
  • Broken radiator fan shroud: The radiator fan shroud directs the airflow across the radiator so the air can absorb the coolant's heat. When the fan shroud breaks or becomes dislodged, air fails to enter the radiator, and the coolant will no longer have a place to direct the transfer of heat.
  • Broken or missing air dam: Along with the shroud, some vehicles have an air dam (or deflector) underneath the vehicle. If this is broken or missing then the air can pass underneath the vehicle but not also through the radiator, which will cause overheating. These air dams are essential in newer vehicles, as they force the air through the fan shroud.
  • Faulty coolant temperature sensor: The temperature sensor takes constant readings of the coolant temperature and sends that information to the engine control unit. Based on the temperature of the coolant, the engine control unit adjusts the ignition timing, the fuel injector pulse, and the operation of the electric cooling fan.
  • Bad water pump: The water pump is responsible for keeping the coolant cycling throughout the engine. After the coolant transfers its heat energy to the air, the water pump recirculates it around the engine so that it can absorb more heat. The most common water pump problems are a leaking pump, bad bearings, or an impeller that has rotted away due to a low coolant ratio.
  • Stuck thermostat: The thermostat acts as a dam for the coolant. When the engine first turns on, and it is still cold, the thermostat keeps the coolant from circulating, which allows the engine to warm up as quickly as possible. Once the engine has reached its operating temperature, the thermostat opens and allows the coolant to circulate. A stuck thermometer may stay permanently sealed and therefore keep the coolant from reaching the engine block.
  • The thermostat may also stick open. This will not usually result in overheating, but it will waste gas.
  • Broken engine cooling fan: The engine has a cooling fan that is deployed when the coolant needs some extra help. When the coolant temperature sensor notices that the coolant temperature is getting too high, the engine control unit (on newer vehicles) will initiate the cooling fan to reduce the temperature.
  • Broken thermostatic fan clutch: Older vehicles use a thermostatic fan clutch to engage the engine cooling fan, which is mounted to the fan blades. The fan clutch uses a bi-metallic spring that tightens when the temperature increases. This acts as a "high speed" option for the fan, and when engaged, it draws more air across the radiator.
  • Blown head gasket: The head gaskets sit between the engine block and the cylinder heads, and keep coolant from entering the engine's oil and combustion chamber. When a gasket blows and coolant seeps in, the issue is not only that the engine will overheat, but also that damage may be done to the catalytic converter and oxygen sensors due to contamination from the coolant. What to expect: A top-rated mobile mechanic will come to your home or office to determine the cause of the temperature warning light turning on and the source of the overheating, and will then provide a detailed inspection report that includes the scope and cost of the necessary repairs. How important is this service? An overheating engine is extremely dangerous. It is not safe to drive a vehicle with an overheating engine, or you may ruin the engine completely and put yourself at risk. As soon as you notice the light come on, pull over. If there is no place to safely pull over, turn off your radio and other electrical units, and turn your heat on high (this will funnel some of the hot engine air into the cabin). As soon as you can safely pull over, do so, and then book one of our mechanics to perform an inspection.

Sep 30, 2016 | 2008 Pontiac G6

1 Answer

Does The Fan Come on When Turned on or Does it have to Heat Up First. Model JS-1500


As long as the fan _does_ come on, it is probably (highly likely) working correctly. These fans control ''overheating'' conditions. They aren't really for ''constant cooling'' like older cars.

Jan 01, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Location of coolant sensor 2000 ford tarus station wagon 3.0 liter v-6


Not sure I follow you.
The engine temp sensor sends a signal to the engine computer and the computer decides when to activate the fan relays. So if you have power to the fans you would also have power to the high or low speed relay the temp sensor is probably working. There is a third relay for the ground circuit.

Jul 07, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Air/heat not blowing from vents, can feel the heat but it's not blowing, I turn the knobs to high blow and it won't do anything, its cold outside,


if the fan does not increase speed as turned up replace resistor assembly usually in heater housing under dash.if doesn,t nave separate resistor assy.it is the fan switch

Feb 11, 2011 | 2002 Buick Century

1 Answer

When putting controls to heat position without defrost air conditioning and both cooling fans come on, what is the problem?


need more info. It may be in fail safe mode.

Are you saying engine cooling fans both come on at high speed when you are in heat mode? They should come on low speed when ever a/c compressor kicks on.

Nov 22, 2010 | 1999 Mercury Sable

2 Answers

Heater blower only blows on low


This could be a few different things:

1.Check the power and ground connections on your blower motor, corrosion can cause high resistance and a slow blower speed.

2. Check your available voltage at the blower motor on the different settings. it should vary with high supplying 12volts, make sure to do this check with the blower motor still plugged in.

3. Connect the blower to a 12v power source and see if it runs at high speed.

If all else fails i would check your resistor pack, i would not suspect this because when it fails you usually just loose all speeds except for high, but it could happen.

Feb 25, 2009 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

NO HEAT


Your heating system is run by your cooling system. If your cooliant is low then you are not going to get adiquiate heat disapation to your heater core. So check the entire cooling systerm. Your water pump (low flow), hoses (leakage), you already checked the thermostat & heater core. So other than that I don't know.

Jan 15, 2009 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

Heater control only works on high


You need a blower motor resistor,and the heater blower motor should be checked for high amp draw. check Napa for the part or go to Dodge..prpbably about 60.00 dollars.

Dec 19, 2008 | 1996 Dodge Caravan

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Air conditioning and heating controls


heater is unpleged cheak with car heater is pulged are unpleged

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