Question about 1999 Honda Civic

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Engine was ideling,shutoff by itself,won,t start again, timing

Belt is intact,didn,t check for static timing, cam is single,and it rotates while cranking, have fuel pressure to fuel rail, all sparkplugs are firing,air flow is unrestricted.

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Posted on Dec 08, 2008

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I changed the water pump, timing belt and idlers and set all cams as instructed, now car won't start. What did I miss?


With the engine at TDC, the small mark on the crank sprocket and intermediate shaft sprocket for the cam timing belt should be pointing at each other (also along the C/L of the center of these pulleys). Then the cam sprocket has two little arrows (triangles) opposite each other that point at the center of two holes in the sprocket. You should line up these arrows with the junction of the #1 cam tower cap and the head (you will be able to see this clearly through those holes). Then install the belt without moving any of these. Start at the crank and work to the intermediate shaft, then to the cam. There should not be any obvious slack in the belt as you do this. Finally get the belt past the tensioner, tension the belt. If you do not have the tensioner tool, then the belt is properly tensioned when you cannot rotate the belt more than 90 degrees or 1/4 turn midway between the cam and intermediate sprockets. You should turn the engine over a couple of revolutions and recheck every thing. One more method of setting the timing belt tension is that there should be approx. 5/16" of deflection from center possible midway between the cam sprocket and the crankshaft sprocket, about where the head meets the block. Also, 90 degrees twist should just be possible midway between the cam sprocket and the intermediate sprocket. I pulled this from the Haynes book.
An easy way to check your cam timing without having to look at the engine sprockets, is to turn your engine to TDC using the flywheel mark, and look at your cam sprocket. Make sure the little arrows are lined up on the cam bearing seam. I use a mirror to get a straight look at it, since your head won't fit in there :)This will ensure cam-crankshaft alignment, and the intermediate shaft alignment is not quite as critical and and be a tooth or two off since it only times the distributor, which of course can itself be rotated when you tune-up your car.NOTE: After replacing the timing belt , turn the engine over a few times by hand and recheck the tension and timing mark alignment . Get your timing light, if it has an advacne dial, set it to 12M-0, if not set the timing to 0M-0, then shine the light into the little hole in the side of the timing belt cover. You should see a hole in the cam sprocket in there, if it's in the middle of the hole, cam timing is OK, if it's towards the front, it's advanced, towards the back, it's ******** a tooth. The timing belt is adjusted by a counter weight tool. Just the weight of the tool is all the tension you need. I check with a tool rental or parts store to see if you can rent one. There is very little tension on the belt, to much and it makes noise and to little and belt will jump. So if you can, find the tool.

Oct 10, 2011 | 1998 Subaru Forester

1 Answer

What is the timing for a 1994 mercury tracer trio. i belive i have to replace the timing belt and the water pump. im not sure tho bc the feul cut off came on first than after i filled it up it went off. im...


First check to make sure the fuel shutoff is still on. When the engine jumps timing it is usually caused by either the water pump bearings went bad and seized or fell apart. The other is when the belt is old or excessively worn and breaks. Timing marks are dependent on engine size. 1.9 engines have single cam and all marks point straight up. 1.8 is more detailed depending on if it has 1 or 2 cams.

Oct 03, 2011 | 1994 Mercury Tracer

1 Answer

How to replace a broken timing belt


Daewoo has interference engines in them, so if the timing belt broke while the engine was running, you will need to replace half of the valves which were bent when the pistons crashed into them when the cams stopped turning and the crank shaft continued to turn. Minimum of $700-1000.00 (usually more). If you do it all yourself and the valve guides are not damaged, still at least $400.00 worth of parts to fix. Pull plastic air dams around bottom of engine on front and right side . Support engine with jack. Drain antifreeze from engine and radiator. remove air filter housing and serpentine belt. remove front engine mount. remove cam belt cover. remove broken cam belt and check cam tensioner bearings and idler bearing as well. They are usually bad. Then remove spark plug cover. Remove valve cover. Remove intake from head. remove coil from head. remove heat shield from exhaust manifold then remove manifold from exhaust and from head. remove water hoses and connecting assemblies from side of head and rear of head. remove Cam shaft bearing caps loosening them all evenly so as not to bend cams. remove cams. remove head bolts. remove head. remove valve hydraulic lifters, compress valve springs and remove valve retainers and dissassemble valves. Clean everything very well. Make sure head is not damaged. Remove valve guide seals. install new valve guide seals, new valves. Seat valves with valve grinding compound. clean well. instal valves in reverse order of dissasembly. Before putting head on, make sure number 1 cylinder is at top dead center position. install head using proper torque of 18 ft # in a spiral application rotation from the center outward in a clockwise direction. Then do spiral rotation again tightening bolts each one-quarter turn. Repeat the tightening process two more times only turning the bolts one-quarter turn each time. Use new head bolts. They are designed to stretch in the process of installation and are not to be re-used. Align cams to proper orientation then bolt into place. do not overtorque cam bearing cap bolts. Less than 5 ft # of torque can stretch these bolts. Snug them then tighten them 90 degrees. Then tighten them another 90 degrees (quarter turn). Snug them all then go back and tighten all of them a quater turn, then go back and tighten all of them another quarter turn. Install the cam idler and tensioner and install the cam belt. then install the intake, exhaust and all other items in reverse order of assembly. Do not turn engine over unless you are sure you have the cam belt on with the crank shaft pulley aligned at top dead center and the intake and exhauste pulley marks aligned to their proper marks with the cam belt properly tensioned. You can't be even one tooth off. This must be right before you turn the engine over! Remove spark plugs and turn engine over by hand two rotation clockwise using a wrench on the center bolt of the crank shaft pulley. Check that the timing of cams is still perfect. If not, correct, retension cam belt, double check timing positions again then rotate engine two revolutions. Check cam timing positions again. The timing should not change! The engine should turn over relatively easily. If it feels like it doesn't want to turn, don't force it. You may have the timing off and be pressing a piston against a valve. If you are at this point, then you need to remove cam belt and unbolt cam shafts to release all tension on any of the valves. return the number one cylinder to top dead center position and then reinstall the cams and cam belt. Once it is assembled and in time, then reattatch the rest of the components that were removed in dissassembly. Do this in reverse order of dissassembly. then connect battery and fill radiator fluid. Start car.

Aug 31, 2010 | Daewoo Nubira Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Okay. I got the old timing belt out and found that all the teeth were gone where it goes around the crankshaft gear. I put a new timing belt on and lined up the marks, but when I rotate the engine several...


the marks on the belt itself will not line up with gear marks after rotating engine as long as engine marks line up you are fine however these are know to bend valves

Aug 21, 2010 | 1991 Nissan Pathfinder

1 Answer

How to set timing marks when changing the timing belt 1995 kia sportage 2.0liter


There is a DOHC or SOHC (double or Single overhead cam engone. Both are Similar. Both have a notch on back side of crank pully that aligns with a tab on engine just above crank pully looks like a triangle with the tip near crank pully is rounded off. SOHC engines have an arrow on cam pully that aligns with a point at top of timing belt rear housing. about straight up at top of it. DOHC have an I and an E on the cam pullys I for INTAKE and E for EXHAUST. the I and E match up at same type points on top of rear Timing belt housing. When installing belt make sure you do not move pullys. put belt on starting with cam shaft (s) then down to crank on tension side which looking at motor will be the right side or Clockwise direction keeping it tight no, or EXTREEMLY little slack. then back up around tensioner. Tensioner should be the last pully to go around. Once on make sure timing marks still lline up.Adjust tensioner and. rotate engine BY HAND 4 times and re check marks.

Oct 09, 2009 | 1995 Kia Sportage

1 Answer

Losing power to fuel shutoff relay


The power for the shutoff relay actually comes from a secondary winding on the ignition coil itself. Why the enging would shut the fuel pump off is that as the engine ran for a while the coil gets warm and then breaks down or opens up the circuit for the fuel shutoff relay. Fixed by replacing $85.00 coil.

Feb 12, 2009 | 1988 Honda Accord 4 Door

2 Answers

1994 Volvo 940 Station Wagon timing belt


I hope you've solved the problem by now, but there are alignment marks on the crank shaft (top pulley), idler (lower side), and cam shaft (smaller, bottom pulley) which should be aligned with stationary marks on the timing belt rear cover.

The belt has marks that align with the aforementioned marks (lines). The double marks on the belt align with the camshaft marks and the single marks with the others.

Loosen the tensioner clamp (nut) to allow the spring loaded tensioner to press on the belt and retighten the nut.

Rotate the crank shaft (clockwise, probably two revolutions) and make sure the pulley marks realign to the marks on the cover (they don't have to realign with the marks on the belt).

Rotate the crank shaft a full revolution once the belt is on and check that alignment is preserved.

Periodically loosen and retension the tensioner nut (access through a hole in the cover) to ensure that tension is maintained as the belt relaxes.

Oct 25, 2008 | 1994 Volvo 940

1 Answer

Timing belt


I believe the 2.7T is set up the same as the 2.8 engine in the A4. In this car (which I own), to do the timing service, cylinder #3 needs to be at TDC on the compression stroke - it's the key cylinder, rather than #1. This is the rear cylinder on the passenger bank. Looking from above, with the nose of the car at the bottom, the arrangement is:

3 6
2 5
1 4

On the 2.8 (again, I am about 95% sure the 2.7T is the same), there are ovoid-shaped brackets witht different-sized holes in them on the exhaust cam pulleys, meant for mounting a cam locking tool (which is unnecessary). When the engine is rotated so that those brackets are horizontal, with the larger holes to the inside, and the smaller holes to the outside, you are at TDC on cylinder #3.

It's almost academic though - as I found when doing timing belt jobs on the 2.8, the cam lock tool is unneeded, since the cams will not spin when the belt comes off, and there are no indexing marks on the timing belt itself - all the positioning that you need to do is to rotate the engine (use a 24mm socket on the crank bolt), so that the oval exhaust cam brackets are horizontal with the larger of the two holes in each positioned toward the center of the engine. From there, you're good to go.

As a side note, when you put it back together, put the timing tensioner on first, then loop the timing belt over the crank sprocket, up over the idler, and over the driver's side cam first, holding tension on the belt and pulling it tight as you do so. Then go under the large center top pulley, around the passenger exhaust cam sprocket (again, pulling tightly so you don't end up with slack in the belt), and then you'll be able to slide it up over the tensioner (someone needs to be pulling the tensioner so that it allows a little play in the belt as it goes on - once the belt is in place, release the tensioner and it'll snug the belt perfectly).

When it's on fully, note the position of the exhaust cam brackets, and rotate the engine with the socket on the crank, two full rotations. Make sure you don't have any background noise (ie, radio, talking people, etc) while you do this. This will rotate the cams once, and you can stop when the brackets reach the position they were in intially. What you're doing is taking the engine through one full revolution by hand, listening for any valve-piston clearance problems. If you don't hear anything make contact inside the engine when you do this, then you're in good shape to put the car back together again.

Oct 24, 2008 | 2000 Audi A6

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