Question about 1995 Chevrolet C1500

1 Answer

Backfires through the carberator

When the motor is cold the 305 motor backfires mostly when the engine is cold. hot or cold weather

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 7 Answers

Bad cam or weak lift

Posted on Jan 25, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Smell fuel near carburetor in front.


The carb float chamber is vented to atmosphere and under certain conditions there will almost always be a fuel smell near the carb, especially for those with a developed sense of smell. Petrol is a liquid with highly volatile elements and in hot weather or a hot engine those elements will readily evaporate and then the vapours will drift where they will.

Any abnormally strong or stronger than usual fuel smell should be investigated and while most leaks will be easy to find with a cold engine and cold weather it is worth noting a tiny fuel leak can create a strong smell in mild or hot weather or with a hot engine and be virtually impossible to find.
It will probably be necessary to remove the air cleaner to check for carb flooding and it is also worth noting in the case of an engine driven fuel pump there is a possibility of a leak into the engine crankcase.

Jun 26, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Can my 2002 trailblazer bak ran without a thermastat


Yes, most all motors can run without a thermostat. They are in the coolant line for the reason of making sure that the water in the engine gets warm enough before cooler water starts circulating thru the engine (an automatic valve ). Most engines are designed to run at a certain temperature and without a thermostat it will just take a while longer for the engine to heat up. Due to the water already circulating upon engine startup.

From my understanding, thermostats were originally installed due to performance issues with motors in cold weather. Obviously, hot weather wouldn't be an issue. If you do take it out and you live somewhere prone to cold temperatures. I would recommend spending the 15 bucks and putting one in by winter, or you might have poor performance of your engine when you first drive it. Good Luck!!

Jun 08, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1994 Chevy full-size Blazer with 5.7 Liter 350 T.B.I. backfires and loses power when going uphill. The vehicle has a new motor with less than 3,000 miles on it, but every bolt on part came off of the old...


Was it originaly a 305? If so then the Electronic Spark Control (ESC), PROM and fuel injectors should be changed to 350 stuff.
Any pinging? Check Engine light?
Maybe take the ignitoon module out and have it tested at an Auto Zone. Without being able to do a hands on diag I am guessing maybe an issue with spark advance when under a load.

Another guess would be a low tank of fuel on a steep hill. Could it be starvation?

Sep 01, 2011 | 1996 Chevrolet C/K 3500

1 Answer

My car doesnt want to start up right away in the morning. Almost like its really cold out and it takes it a min. The rest of the day its fine runs great. Any ideas?


Reason 1 - Gasoline, like any other liquid, evaporates less when it is cold.You have seen this -- if you pour water onto a hot sidewalk it will evaporate a lot faster than it will from a cooler place like a shady sidewalk. When it gets really cold, gasoline evaporates slowly so it is harder to burn it (the gasoline must be vaporized to burn). Sometimes you will see people spray ether into their engines in cold weather to help them start -- ether evaporates better than gasoline in cold weather.

Reason 2 - Oil gets a lot thicker in cold weather. You probably know that cold pancake syrup or honey from the refrigator is a lot thicker than hot syrup or honey. Oil does the same thing. So when you try to start a cold engine, the engine has to push around the cold, gooey oil and that makes it harder for the engine to spin. In really cold places people must use synthetic motor oils because these oils stay liquid in cold temperatures.


Re ason 3 - Batteries have problems in cold weather, too. A battery is a can full of chemicals that produce electrons The chemical reactions inside of batteries take place more slowly when the battery is cold, so the battery produces fewer electrons. The starter motor therefore has less energy to work with when it tries to start the engine, and this causes the engine to crank slowly.

All three of these problems can make it impossible to start an engine in really cold weather. People either keep their cars in heated garages or use "block heaters" to get around these problems. A block heater is a little electric heater that you plug into the wall to keep the engine warm.
i hope it was convince answers

May 30, 2011 | Dodge Stratus Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine oil capacity & type


Hello,

Visco 2000 or mobil oil, use the dipstick to check do not let it be too full.

The type specified by the vehicle manufacturer in your owner's manual. For most passenger car and light truck gasoline engines today, it's any oil that meets the American Petroleum Institutes "SH" rating.
As for the viscosity of oil to use, most new engines today require a multiviscosity 5W-30 oil for all-round driving. The lighter 5W-30 oils contain friction reducing additives that help improve fuel economy, and also allow the oil to quickly reach critical upper valvetrain components when a cold engine is first started. Most engine wear occurs immediately after a cold start, so it's important to have oil that is thin enough to circulate easily -- especially at cold temperatures.
For older engines and ones that are driven at sustained highways speeds during hot weather, 10W-30 or 10W-40 is a good choice. Heavier multiviscosity oils such as 20W-40 are for high rpm, high-load applications primarily and are not recommended for cold weather driving.
Straight weight 30W and 40W oils aren't very popular anymore, but some diehards insist on using them. They say the thicker oil holds up better under high temperature (which it does), increases oil pressure and reduces oil consumption in high mileage engines. But straight 30W and 40W oils are too thick for cold weather and may make an engine hard to start. They may also be too thick to provide adequate start-up lubrication to critical upper valvetrain components during cold weather. So switching to a straight 20W oil would be necessary for cold weather driving. Straight 10W oil can also improve cold starting, but is very thin and should only be used in sub-zero climates. A multiviscosity 10W-30 or 10W-40 will provide the same cold starting benefits of a 10W oil and the high temperature protection of a 30W or 40W oil.
For the ultimate in high temperature protection, durability and all-round performance, synthetic oils are the way to go. Unfortunately, most synthetic oils cost up to three times as much as ordinary petroleum-based oils. They cost more because synthetics are manmade rather than refined from petroleum. But this improves their performance in virtually every aspect:
  • Superior temperature resistance. Synthetics can safely handle higher operating temperatures without oxidizing (burning) or breaking down. The upper limit for most mineral based oils is about 250 to 300 degrees F. Synthetics can take up to 450 degrees F. or higher. This makes synthetics well-suited for turbo applications as well as high rpm and high output engine applications.
  • Better low temperature performance. Synthetics flow freely at subzero temperatures, pouring easily at -40 or -50 degrees F. where ordinary oils turn to molasses. This makes for easier cold starts and provides faster upper valvetrain lubrication during the first critical moments when most engine wear occurs.
  • Better engine performance. Synthetics tend to be more slippery than their petroleum-based counterparts, which improves fuel economy, cuts frictional horsepower losses and helps the engine run cooler. The difference isn't great, but it can make a noticeable difference.
  • Longer oil change intervals. Because synthetics resist oxidation and viscosity breakdown better than ordinary motor oils, some suppliers say oil change intervals can be safely extended -- in some cases stretched to as much as 25,000 miles. Such claims are justified by the fact that synthetics don't break down or sludge up as fast as ordinary mineral-based oils do in use. CAUTION: For vehicles under warranty, extending the normal change interval is not recommended because failing to follow the OEM's maintenance schedule can void your warranty.
    Synthetics are available in the same grades as ordinary motor oils (5W-30, 5W-20 and 10W-30) as well as "extended" grades such as 15W-50 and even 5W-50.
    There are also lower-cost synthetic "blends" that combine synthetic and petroleum-based oils in the same container. But you can do your own blend to save money by simply substituting a quart or two of synthetic oil for conventional oil when you change oil. Synthetics are compatible with conventional motor oils.
    Who should use a synthetic oil? The premium-priced oil is best for:
    • Turbocharged or supercharged engines
    • Performance or high output engines
    • Vehicles used for towing (especially during hot weather)
    • Vehicles that are operated in extremely cold or hot climates
    • Anyone who wants the ultimate in lubrication and protection

Take care and good luck

Dec 03, 2010 | 2008 Nissan Xterra

2 Answers

Why would my oil press. be 3/4 up on guage all the time.cold starting little knoise fo 30 sec.


The weather you live in, oil weight being used, what type of car/truck. I'm thinking run an engine cleaner through for 5 min to clean the engine. What you are hearing is most likely a sticky valve. Drain the oil, change the filter and fill with a light oil in the cold with light loads and heavier oil in hot weather. A multi viscosity oil can be used to weigh out the cold and hot weather.

Sep 09, 2010 | Ford Excursion Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

During cold weather the engine runs fine but during warm weather the engine dies


Could be a problem with your intake air temp sensor or your coolant temp sensor. The most likely would be the coolant temp sensor. It may be reading cold and will make it run good as the engine is cold but as it warms it is not adjusting the air fuel ration to the proper levels making it run rough hot

May 23, 2010 | 1992 Pontiac Bonneville

1 Answer

91 camaro not tpi it starts up fine but until it warms up you try


idle air control is used for assisting in fold starts. It sounds like its not functioning propperly. FYI your car is not carberated, its called a throttle body.

Jun 23, 2009 | 1991 Chevrolet Camaro

1 Answer

1987 camaro


sounds like the fusable link which feeds power to the ignition switch has gone to the happy hunting ground. this fusable link is bolted to the starter motor battery terminal along with up to four others.

Dec 28, 2008 | 1987 Chevrolet Camaro

1 Answer

Will not start on hot day's in the sun.[engine cranks normal]


The normal reason why a hot engine doesn't start is the choke. Your fancy new range rover will have a computer controlled choke that will be activiated by a temperature sensor. maybe this has failed or is disconnected
In my ancient range rover I have a manual choke but essentially the same engine. I know that if the motor is hot I can't start it with the choke on.
The way the choke works is it restricts the airflow into the engine so that there is a richer fuel / air mixture which is needed for a cold start. If the engine is hot and the choke comes on the engiine floods with petrol and there isn't enough oxygen for it too ignite in the cylinders. To start a flooded engine you have to open the choke and crank the motor without pressing the accelerator. This pumps out the petrol vapour and eventually it will fire and start. If the computer thinks it is cold because of a disconnected or faulty sensor it will put on the choke whenever you try and start and the engine will flood.
I think a vapour lock is unlikely unless you driving in extremely hot weather (above 40 degrees celsius).

Oct 08, 2008 | 2008 Land Rover Range Rover

Not finding what you are looking for?
1995 Chevrolet C1500 Logo

Related Topics:

141 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Chevrolet Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

61037 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

21949 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

6812 Answers

Are you a Chevrolet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...