Question about 2001 Subaru Forester

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Electric engine cooling fan switches on for about one second only

When driving in city traffic, slowing down and/or stopping will often cause the cooling fan to come on (as expected) but I hear it go off again after about one second . This seems to me to be too short an interval to accomplish effective cooling and suggests that there is somethig amiss in the sensor/control sequence. The check engine MIL light does NOT light. The temperature gauge does NOT move from where it always stays after warmup. The fan DOES stay on longer, however, when I stop the car and let it idle until the fan turns on. (Runs for 1-2 minutes). This is either something new or something I haven't noticed in the 9 months that I've had this car. Could this be normal operation?

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Thats sound normal..like i always say if it's not broke don't try to fix it..

Posted on Dec 04, 2008

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2 Answers

2002 lincoln. Ls v8.. burning smell?? Tried to run hot after 15min drive at a red light but when i took off went back to half way? Keeps running hot??


Engine is too hot which is burning oil and road dirt off the engine. Sounds like a bad thermostat or a water pump problem. The radiator may be partially blocked too.

Feb 21, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

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Where is the engine over heat shut off switch?


Hello - when the engine overheats (and your ignition/key switch) is still functional you basically have two options:

1. Turn the vehicle off at the key (you could also disconnect the negative terminal on the battery - cars aren't the way they used to be - you can't disconnect the cable to see if the alternator is producing the electricity to keep the vehicle going - if you disconnect the battery the car is down for the count with the electrical systems now.

2. If you're driving in a residential area or city (redlight to redlight or stop sign to stop sign) - all that stop and go traffic prevents you from running the vehicle down the road without stopping to get cool air pushing through the radiator. If you're ever in a situation and you have no choice but to drive and the car is overheating/but not blowing the bypass on the cap - you can also get out on the interstate - going those speeds without stopping forces cool air over/through the radiator - helping to cool down the coolant faster. Unless there is a near total meltdown - that will actually help the engine cool faster than just the radiator fan will.

B

Jan 26, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My pajero is overheating afew minutes after starting what could be the cause?


An overheating engine is more than a bummer, it can be an expensive engine killer that will leave you on the side of the road, then on to the repair shop for an expensive repair bill. If your car has been running hot, you know the feeling. You're sitting in traffic, the light turns green, and you pray that traffic breaks enough for you to get some air flowing over the radiator so that engine temperature needle will go down just a little bit. It's beyond stressful, and there's no reason you should be forced to endure this. The fact is, there are only a few things that commonly cause an engine to overheat regularly. 1. Low Coolant By a large margin, the most common cause for engine overheating is simply a low coolant level. Your engine's cooling system relies on coolant to circulate and remove heat from the engine. If you don't have enough coolant in there to do the job, heat will build up and your engine will overheat. No amount of running the heater in the summer will help if you don't have enough coolant in the radiator to transfer that heat. By far, the first thing you should do if your engine seems to be running hot is check your coolant level. 2. Electric Cooling Fan Failure If you have an electric cooling fan that isn't coming on, this can cause your engine to overheat. The electric cooling fan draws cooler air through your radiator when your car isn't going fast enough to ram it through from the front. You can test this by letting your car idle long enough for the engine to heat up. If you've been having an overheating problem in traffic, keep an eye on your temperature gauge. When it starts creeping into the danger zone, look under the hood to see if your electric fan is running. If it's not, you'll need to figure out why. There are two usual causes to this:
2a. Bad Electric Fan: Sometimes your fan motor will just burn out and your fan won't come on at all. To test this, find your radiator fan switch and disconnect the wiring harness. Get a jumper wire and insert it into both contacts, your fan should come on. Another way to test the fan is to turn on the air conditioning. Most, but not all, cars activate the cooling fan at either a medium or high speed when you turn on the AC.
2b. Bad Radiator Fan Switch: There is a switch that tells your cooling fan to come on when your coolant reaches a certain temperature. The easiest way to test this switch is to disconnect the wiring harness and then run a jumper wire across the harness contacts. If the fan comes on, you need to replace the switch. 3. Thermostat Not Opening The most common symptom of a failed thermostat is overheating at highway speeds. Your engine may be able to stay cool at low speeds because it's not working that hard, and therefore not creating as much heat. But at highway speeds your engine needs lots of coolant flowing through. If the thermostat doesn't open, there isn't enough flow to keep things cool, and you'll find yourself looking more like a steam ship than a sedan going down the highway. 4. Broken Fan Belt There are still lots of engines out there which have a fan belt to drive the engine cooling fan. If you see a belt attached to your fan, you're in this club. The good news is your repair is always cheaper than the electric guys. You can replace your fan belt easily if it's broken. 5. Clogged Radiator If your car has more than 50,000 miles on it, your radiator could start getting gummed up. You can avoid this and other problems associated with old coolant by flushing rad every year.

Nov 26, 2013 | Peugeot Liberte Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Overheating problem, what is the most probable cause?


You need to stop using it immediately before you
cause some damage or more than you may already have
That is just common sense. It should not overheat or
be any different than it was in the past without problem

The car has to be checked over/diagnosed,tested,etc for
various issues to resolve

Borrow or Rent a car until resolved

No way to guess at the problem

You should have some type of codes avail even
if the check light isn't on,you need professional help
to get a start on resolving

The timing belt maybe worn & jumped or the head gasket
bad.

Over heating isn't usually a cheap repair unless the thermostat
sticks partially closed

The RPM moves around the car is 11 years old,so it may just
need a though going over

Timing Belt,O2 Sensors,Exhaust Converter,Spark Plugs
and such

If you depend on a repair shop to do things & don't
have the knowledge to request work done throughout
the year,then you run into a lack of proactive preventative
maintenance situation. Most things are simple looking
back, once resolved

Sep 06, 2012 | 2002 Chevrolet Prizm

2 Answers

Engine over heats


Check for collapsed radiator hose first.

Do the cooling fans come on? If not, check fuse, relay and if still no function- fan thermostat switch.

If fans do come on, replace water pump.

Jan 24, 2012 | 2001 Plymouth Neon

1 Answer

Toyota Corolla 1995. Quality of air conditioner reduced when stopped (traffic light) or moving at slow speed (condenced city traffic) No problem on the highway. Checked freon gas and fan. Understand that...


Normal, the ac heat exchanger condenser need air moving across the fins to remove the heat. While moving in town the condenser isn't remove the meat that is building up the it's aluminum fins. Even though the vehicle uses an electric fan. The fan is used to cool the engine temperature. If you Toyota is equip-ed with automatic transmission. The electric fan will need to pull enough air to cool the engine temperature, automatic transmission fluid, air conditioner condenser, and maybe power steering condenser to cool the power steering fluid. Later model of vehicles/trucks are using different refrigerants instead R134A in which you Toyota uses.

The simples way to explain is the ac remove heat from inside your Toyota and this heat is removed by the refrigerants inside your ac in the car. To cool the refrigerant this coolant is removed to the heat exchanger condenser located in front of the engine radiator. So, while moving at 60mph there is enough air flow through the radiator, ac head condenser, and other aluminum heat exchangers. GB...stewbison

Sep 12, 2011 | 1995 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

Engine runs hot after a few minutes of running the car


That is very vague. Have you checked the radiator, and when it is hot does the electric cooling fan come on? Try running the A/C and see if the cooling fan comes on. Does it run hot on the highway or just in city traffic? I need some more details to try and narrow it down. There are many things it could be. Low coolant, stuck thermostat, air in the cooling system, bad fan motor, fan motor relay (also known as fan switch), or temp sensor.

Jul 17, 2011 | 2000 Oldsmobile Intrigue

1 Answer

When idling my jeep overheats. The cooling fan is running and it speeds up when temperature goes up. The temperature gets close to 260 degrees and the engine tries to stall. when I start moving it cools...


At idling speed an engine does build up a lot of heat and the cooling fan will kick in. In slow moving traffic or traffic jams the temperature gauge can touch the red - particularly on hot days. The reason it cools down when you start moving is because of the air flow through the radiator.

Presumably there are no leaks from the cooling system otherwise you would have mentioned it. In normal circumstances the fan will not be running as you are driving at speed, as the air-flow through the radiator is sufficient to cool things. The fan only kicks in to get rid of excess heat - and this usually occurs at idling speed or after you have parked the car.

If the fan is running all the time as you drive, this points to either a fault in the fan switch, or the car is running too hot. presumably in normal driving the fan isn't running and the temperature gauge reads normal?

It is common - in stationary traffic many cars overheat (particularly big engined models) try to stall and 'cut out'. Restarting can be difficult until the engine cools down.

Is your car overheating in normal driving conditions or just at idle speed? Overheating in normal driving conditions can be caused by things like a failing water pump, blocked radiator, collapsed hose, faulty thermostat or, in the worst case scenario, cylinder head problems.

Overheating at idling speed is 'common'. Check your coolant level. If your car isn't using/losing coolant then there probably is no major problem. You can flush out the cooling system and refill with new coolant - and also check your radiator. Are the cooling fins crumbling with age? Or maybe they're partly clogged with insects and debris from the road? A blast with a hosepipe wil sort that out ..

The question is how much does your car overheat in normal driving? If it doesn't .. it appears as though you have nothing to worry about as such. Most cars have 2 speed fans... the 2nd faster stage kicks in at some point dependant on engine temperature. Perfectly normal.

Aug 14, 2010 | 2003 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2 Answers

2001 chevy monte carlo is overheating when driving


Hi;
If your engine cools down when moving fast, you either have a problem with your water pump or your electric fans that cool off your radiator and a/c condenser. This is controlled by a temperature switch, but these fans should kick on instantly when A/C is selected.

Nov 22, 2009 | 2001 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

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