Question about Honda Accord

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I have water leaking from the engine, but don't know where from. The radiator has been changed the water tested for emmissions, pressure tested and still water is leaking. The heating blows hot when under pressure but cold when stationary - can you please help me. The car is a rover 45 02 plate 1.6

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Hi it has the classic symptoms of a failed water pump, when stationary no water/coolant is running around the engine hence cold air, when driving its forcing the water/coolant around the engine giving the warm air,, solution have the water pump changed before the head gasket blows, Hope this helps

Posted on Dec 04, 2008

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If you see the water leaking form the front side of the engine usually from the water pump since the pump is not running you also wont get heat, bit when you pressurise the sys you are forcing the hot water into the core and you have heat, it is the water pump.

Posted on Dec 04, 2008

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check the oil for moisture.
pull the plugs to see if any are steam cleaned.
either one could indicate a bad head gasket or worse damaged head.
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Mar 11, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

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Losing a lot of coolant. I don't see a leak. I started to drain the system and it smells burnt to s**t. What might my problem and possible solutions be?


see this causes and fix it. God bless you
Water pump -- A bad shaft seal will allow coolant to dribble out of the vent hole just under the water pump pulley shaft. If the water pump is a two-piece unit with a backing plate, the gasket between the housing and back cover may be leaking. The gasket or o-ring that seals the pump to the engine front cover on cover-mounted water pumps can also leak coolant. Look for stains, discoloration or liquid coolant on the outside of the water pump or engine.
Radiator -- Radiators can develop leaks around upper or loser hose connections as a result of vibration. The seams where the core is mated to the end tanks is another place where leaks frequently develop, especially on aluminum radiators with plastic end tanks. On copper/brass radiators, leaks typically occur where the cooling tubes in the core are connected or soldered to the core headers. The core itself is also vulnerable to stone damage. Internal corrosion caused by old coolant that has never been changed can also eat through the metal in the radiator, causing it to leak.
Most cooling systems today are designed to operate at 8 to 14 psi. If the radiator can't hold pressure, your engine will overheat and lose coolant.
Hoses -- Cracks, pinholes or splits in a radiator hose or heater hose will leak coolant. A hose leak will usually send a stream of hot coolant spraying out of the hose. A corroded hose connection or a loose or damaged hose clamp may also allow coolant to leak from the end of a hose. Sometimes the leak may only occur once the hose gets hot and the pinhole or crack opens up.

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3 Answers

How do you know which head or gasget is blown/


Try this to see if helps you figure this out. Try filling up the radiator with water. Start your engine with the radiator cap off look for bubbles the bigger the bubbles the worse the leak. Look for tan colored oil on the dipstick. When oil mixes with water it turn a creamy tan color.

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Have to replace water pump on 98 Ford Taurus. Any hints or suggestions would be appreciated before I get out in the snow and cold to fix this.


You can change the water pump by doing these steps:

  • With the engine off and cold, o pen the hood and locate the vehicle’s radiator and water pump.
  • Remove the radiator cap.
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  • Place a drain pan under the radiator. Open the drain valve or remove the lower radiator hose to drain the cooling system.
  • Remove the drive belts or serpentine belt.
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  • Using a gasket scraper, clean the mounting surface on the engine block.
  • Install a new gasket and attach the new water pump to the engine with the original mounting bolts. Tighten the bolts to the manufacturer’s specifications.
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1 Answer

Check engine on, coolant overheating, i already change water pump, but water hose is with a lot of pressure, do you think can be air on water system?


All car cooling systems have at least 10lb pressure, check with your manufacturer on your car's radiator pressure cap or local parts supplier. If pressure is alot more then I would suspect a leaking head gasket.

Easiest test for the obvious leaking head gasket is when the engineis cold / remove the radiator cap and fill right to the top with water and crank / start engine. If you see a mini "guyser" of water come out then head (S) need to come off.

You haven't mentioned whether its actually losing . using water??

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4 Answers

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