Question about 1992 Plymouth Voyager

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Exhaust valve stem hight above head?

After seats were ground, an auto repair shop said one valve is staying open due to the stem length since the the valves are now recessed.

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Ask them grind some off the stem if they can.Many valves stems are hollow and filled with sodium to aid in cooling so the amount amount they can remove is limited,but they may be able to take some off to correct the problem. I would consider this a warranty situation regardless of what fix it requires.There are tolerances that must be adhered to when doing machine work and this is the result of not keeping within these tolerances.They should have used a new valve as it would have been thicker at the valve face.Whatever you do don't drive the car. You will burn the valve.

Posted on Dec 31, 2008

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Having loud valve tick on 3rd cylinder compression test showed it was weak. took valve cover off and checked everything with feeler gauge to find


If you know how valves are installed in a head, then you know there is one traditional way to repair problem -- pull the head off.
The other is to replaced the seals and keepers while holding the valve up against the valve seat from the valve stem. Mess up and you pull the head to finish the repair. For someone who has not done engine work - take the car to the shop OR pull the head and take it in, Normally if there are 2 heads you do both at the same time, because repairing one side makes it stronger than the other and the can bring on other problems.

Apr 04, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

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Backfired then quit


sounds like your exhaust valves aren't opening up which means either your cam is out of round, push rods are bent/flatten rocker arms broken, broken valve stem/seat, hopefully just the valve got stuck closed due to carbon build up

Jun 01, 2013 | 1992 Pontiac Grand Am

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What does it mean when your heads are in need of an overhaul?


What that means are new valve seats and valve guide, with new valve stem,with new or refurbished valves,This is a common need after so many years in service

Mar 15, 2012 | 1991 Lincoln Town Car

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What is the clearance for rod bearings on the crank of a 98 ford f 150 4.6


General Specifications Item Specification
Displacement L (CID) 4.6 (281)
Number of Cylinders 8
Bore and Stroke mm 90.2 x 90.0
Firing Order 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8
Oil Pressure (HOT @ 1500 rpm) kPa 138-310
Drive Belt Tension a
Cylinder Head and Valve Train
Combustion Chamber Volume cm 52?±.5
Valve Seats Width?€"Intake mm 1.9-2.1
Valve Seats Width?€"Exhaust mm 1.9-2.1
Valve Seats Angle 44.51-45.01 degrees
Valve Seats Runout (T.I.R.) Max mm 0.025
Valve Arrangement (Front-to-Rear) (Left Hand) E-I-E-I-E-I-E-I
(Right Hand)
I-E-I-E-I-E-I-E
Valve Stem to Guide Clearance?€"Intake mm (Inch) 0.020-0.069
(0.00078-0.00272)
Valve Stem to Guide Clearance?€"Exhaust mm (Inch) 0.045-0.095 (0.0018-0.0037)
Valve Head Diameter?€"Intake mm (Inch) 44.5- (1.75)
Valve Head Diameter?€"Exhaust mm (Inch) 34.0 (1.34)
Valve Head Diameter?€"Gauge Diameters mm (Inch) 42.5- and 32.0
(1.67 and 1.26)
Valve Face Runout Limit mm (Inch) 0.05 (0.002)
Valve Face Angle 45.25-45.75 degrees
Valve Stem Diameter (STD)
?€"Intake mm (Inch) 6.995-6.975 (0.275-0.2746)
Valve Stem Diameter (Std)
?€"Exhaust mm (Inch) 6.970-6.949 (0.274-0.2736)
Valve Springs?€"
Compression Pressure N @
Spec. Length?€"Intake 587.14 N @ 28.02 mm
Valve Springs?€"
Compression Pressure N @
Spec. Length?€"Exhaust 587.14 N @
28.02 mm
Valve Springs?€"Free
Length ( Approximate)?€"
Intake mm (Inch) 49.55 (1.951)
Valve Springs?€"Free
Length (Approximate)?€"
Exhaust mm (Inch) 49.55 (1.951)
Valve Springs?€"Installed
Pressure N @ Spec. Length
?€"Intake 244.64 N @ 40.0 mm
Valve Spring?€"Installed
Pressure N @ Spec. Length
?€"Exhaust 244.64 N @ 40.0 mm
Valve Springs?€"Installed
Pressure N @ Spec. Length
?€"Service Limit 10 % Pressure Less @ 28.02 mm
Valve Springs?€"Installed
Pressure N @ Spec. Length
?€"Out of Square Limit 2 degrees
Valve Guide Inner
Diameter mm (Inch) 7.015-7.044 (0.2761-0.2773)
Rocker Arm?€"Ratio 1.75:1
Valve Tappet?€"Diameter
(STD) mm (Inch) 16.000-15.988 (0.66-0.629)
Valve Tappet?€"Clearance
to Bore mm (Inch) 0.018-0.069
(0.00071-0.00272)
Valve Tappet?€"Service
Limit mm (Inch) 0.016 (0.00063)
Valve Tappet?€"Hydraulic
Leakdown Rate b 5-25 seconds
Valve Tappet?€"Collapsed
Valve Tappet Gap?€"
Desired mm (Inch) 0.085-0.45 (0.0033-0.0177)
Camshaft
Lobe Lift?€"Intake
mm (Inch) 6.58939 (0.2594)
Lobe Lift?€"Exhaust
mm (Inch) 6.58939 (0.2594)
Lobe Lift?€"Allowable
Lobe Lift Loss mm (Inch) 0 (0)
Theoretical Valve Lift @
Zero Lash?€"Intake
mm (Inch) 12.0 (0.472)
Theoretical Valve Lift @
Zero Lash?€"Exhaust
mm (Inch) 12.0 (0.472)
End Play mm (Inch) 0.025-0.165
(0.00098-0.0065)
Journal to Bearing
Clearance mm (Inch) 0.025-0.076
(0.00098-0.003
Journal to Bearing
Clearance?€"Service Limit
mm (Inch) 0.021 (0.0048)
Journal Diameter (All)
mm (Inch) 26.962-26.936
(1.061-1.060)
Journal Diameter (All)?€"
Bearing Inside Diameter
(All) mm (Inch) 27.012-26.987
(1.063-1.0625)
Camshaft Runout
mm (Inch) 0.05 (0.002)
Cylinder Bore
Diameter?€"Surface Finish
(RMS) 0.2-0.6 Microns
Diameter?€"Out-of-Round
Limit mm (Inch) 0.015 (0.0006)
Diameter?€"Out-of-Round
Service Limit mm (Inch) 0.020 (0.00079)
Diameter?€"Taper Service
Limit mm (Inch) 0.006 (0.00023)
Piston
Piston?€"Diameter?€"
Coded Red 1 mm (Inch) 90.177-90.197
(3.550-3.551)
Piston?€"Diameter?€"
Coded Blue 2 mm (Inch) 90.190-90.210
(3.5507-3.5515)
Piston?€"Diameter?€"
Coded Yellow 3 mm (Inch) 90.203-90.223
(3.513-3.5521)
Piston-to-Bore-Clearance
mm (Inch) -0.015 + 0.031 (0.0005-0.0012)
Pin Bore Diameter
mm (Inch) 22.0015-22.004
(0.866-0.8663)
Ring Groove Width?€"
Compression (Top)
mm (Inch) 1.520-1.550 (0.06-0.610)
Ring Groove Width?€"
Compression (Bottom)
mm (Inch) 1.520-1.530 (0.060-0.0602)
Ring Groove Width?€"Oil
Ring mm (Inch) 6.996-7.224 (0.275-0.2844)
Piston Pin?€"Length
mm (Inch) 61.93-62.05 (2.44-2.443)
Diameter mm (Inch) 21.994-21.999
(0.866-0.8661)
Pin to Piston Clearance
mm (Inch) 0.005-0.010
(0.0002-0.0004)
Pin to Rod Clearance
mm (Inch) 0.015-0.040
(0.0006-0.00157)
Piston Rings?€"Ring Gap
?€"Compression (Top)
mm (Inch) 1.0 MAX (0.0394)
Piston Rings?€"Ring Gap
?€"Compression (Top)
mm (Inch) 1.0 MAX (0.0394)
Oil Ring?€"Side Clearance
mm (Inch) 1.25 MAX (0.05)
Oil Ring?€"Compression
(Top) mm (Inch) 0.040-0.090
(0.0016-0.0031)
Oil Ring?€"Compression
(Top) mm (Inch) 0.030-0.080
(0.0012-0.00031)
Oil Ring Snug Fit
Oil Ring?€"Service Limit
mm (Inch) 0.015 MAX (0.0006)
Ring Gap?€"Compression
(Top) mm (Inch) 0.23-0.49
(0.01-0.02)
Ring Gap?€"Compression
(Bottom) mm (Inch) 0.23-0.49
(0.01-0.02)
Ring Gap?€"Oil Ring (Steel
Rail) mm (Inch) 0.05-0.66 (0.006-0.026)
Lubrication System
Oil Capacity?€"Automatic
Transmission (Quarts U.S.) 6.675?±0.125
Oil Capacity?€"Manual
Transmission (Quarts U.S.) 6.425?±0.125
Cylinder Block
Main Bearing Bore
Diameter mm (Inch) 72.401-72.422 (2.85-2.851)
Crankshaft and Flywheel
Main Bearing Journal
Diameter mm (Inch) 67.483-67-503 (2.65-2.657)
Connecting Rod Journal?€"
Diameter mm (Inch) 52.988-53.003
(2.0861-2.0867)
Crankshaft Free End Play
mm (Inch) 0.130-0.301 (0.0051-0.012)
Crankshaft Runout to Rear
Face of Block mm (Inch) 0.050 MAX (0.002)
Connecting Rod Bearings
Clearance to Crankshaft?€"
Desired mm (Inch) 0.027-0.069 (0.001-0.0027)
Clearance to Crankshaft?€"
Allowable mm (Inch) 0.027-0/069 (0.001-0.0027)
Bearing Wall Thickness
(STD) mm (Inch) 2.44-2.452 (0.096-0.0965)
Main Bearings
Clearance to Crankshaft?€"
Desired mm (Inch) 0027-0.065
(0.0011-0.0026)
Clearance to Crankshaft?€"
Allowable mm (Inch) 0.027-0.065
(0.0011-0.0026)
Bearing Wall Thickness
(STD) mm (Inch) 1.920-1.928 (0.075-0.076)
Connecting Rod, Piston and Rings
Connecting Rod?€"Piston
Pin Bore Diameter
mm (Inch) 21.959-21.979
(0.864-0.865)
Connecting Rod?€"
Crankshaft Bearing Bore
Diameter mm (Inch) 56.756-56.876 (2.234-2.24)
Connecting Rod?€"Length
(Center-to-Center)
mm (Inch) 150.7 (5.93)
Alignment (Bore-to-Bore
Max. Diff.) c ?€"Twist
mm (Inch) 0.050 per 25 (0.0015-0.984)
Alignment (Bore-to-Bore
Max. Diff.)?€"Bend
mm (Inch) 0.038 per 25 (0.0015-0.984)
Side Clearance (Assembled
to Crank)?€"Standard
mm (Inch) 0.015-0.45 (0.0006-0.0177)
Side Clearance (Assembled
to Crank)?€"Service Limit
mm (Inch) 0.05 MAX (0.02)
Crankshaft Main Bearing
Journal Taper mm (Inch) 0.020 (0.0007)
Crankshaft Main Bearing
Journal Runout mm (Inch) 0.05 (0.002)
Crankshaft Connecting Rod
Journal Taper mm (Inch) 0.015 (0.0006)

Feb 15, 2011 | 1998 Ford F150 Regular Cab

1 Answer

How difficult is it to replace valves in a 85 Toyota Pickup?


It can be done, but it is classified under the engine overhaul reconditioning, which can be time consuming and expensive for an engine machinist to do. To do it yourself is not usually recommended.--- REMOVAL & INSTALLATION A valve spring compressor is needed to remove the valves and springs; these are available at most auto parts and auto tool shops. A small magnet is very helpful for removing the keepers and spring seats. Set the head on its side on the bench. Install the spring compressor so that the fixed side of the tool is flat against the valve head in the combustion chamber, and the screw side is against the retainer. Slowly turn the screw in towards the head, compressing the spring. As the spring compresses, the keepers will be revealed; pick them off of the valve stem with the magnet as they are easily fumbled and lost. When the keepers are removed, back the screw out and remove the retainers and springs. Remove the compressor and pull the valves out of the head from the other side. Remove the valve seals by hand and remove the spring seats with the magnet. Fig. 1: After compressing the valve spring, be careful removing the keepers--they are easily fumbled 85783113.gif
Fig. 2: Always install new valve stem seals 85783114.gif
Fig. 3: Lightly tap each assembled valve stem to ensure correct fit of the keepers, retainer and seals 85783115.gif
Fig. 4: Special tool to remove the valve spring--you also need tool to hold valve up 85783273.jpg
Fig. 5: Removing the keepers with a magnet 85783274.jpg
Fig. 6: Removing the valve spring 85783275.jpg
Fig. 7: Removing the valve seal 85783276.jpg
Fig. 8: Installing the valve seal 85783277.jpg
Since it is very important that each valve and its spring, retainer, spring seat and keepers is reassembled in its original location, you must keep these parts in order. The best way to do this to cut either eight (four cylinder) or twelve (six cylinder) holes in a piece of heavy cardboard or wood. Label each hole with the cylinder number and either IN EXp>After lapping each valve into its seat (see Valve Lapping below), oil each valve stem, and install each valve into the head in the reverse order of removal, so that all parts except the keepers are assembled on the stem. Always use new valve stem seals. Install the spring compressor, and compress the retainer and spring until the keeper groove on the valve stem is fully revealed. Coat the groove with a wipe of grease (to hold the keepers until the retainer is released) and install both keepers, wide end up. Slowly back the screw of the compressor out until the spring retainer covers the keepers. Remove the tool. Lightly tap the end of each valve stem with a rubber hammer to ensure proper fit of the retainers and keepers. prev.gif next.gif

Dec 19, 2010 | 1985 Toyota Pickup

2 Answers

My 1998 Buick Lesabre ,I just had an oil change, it just developed has noisy lifters. Also the antifreeze reservoir is always losing the fluid, I am always refilling.


Suggest you check your exhaust on startup, is it very steamed up. Unless you see fluid on the ground after you have been driving, it may be being burnt inside the engine via a leaking head gasket, causing part of the head to misfire, 1 or 2 cyls. Is the oil milky? a sure sign of a leaking manifold gasket. At the end of the day, the coolant must be going somewhere, if its not on the floor, its in the head/manifold. A manifold leak is not so bad, Head gasket is not so good..worth doing a compression test and block test if you can.Also, change the oil again and put in at lest 10W-30 weight, your car is too old for 5/20 5/30...Hope that helps..Tim

May 26, 2010 | 1998 Buick LeSabre

1 Answer

Oil consumption and black ezhaust mercedes 280e 1984,compressy ok,sometimes ONE bougie fouled.


Compressor is OK meaning your valves are still good. However the Valve- Stem seals need to be replaced. The seals have function to limit the lubricating oil amount the valve train. When they are worn out, too much of oil gets in to the valve area then get burnt out to the exhaust causing oil consumption. These valve can be replaced at a shop without taking the head off the engine. Although it sounds simple but not all the shop want to do this, since they want to take the head out to make more money. So check around until you find one. The work is to put air compressor at the spark plug location to hold a valve up so the valve-stem seal could be replaced from above. This will be repeated for every valve on the engine. Although not being an auto mechanic, I did on mine and fount it was at medium level of difficulty. Good luck.

Mar 14, 2010 | 1999 Mercedes-Benz E-Class

1 Answer

Without dismantling the engine describe fully two test procedures that could be used to confirm a misfire due to poor valve seat. its any car but it wouldnt allow me to send you the question without...


First I would check the compression of the engine if you haven't already. If it turns out that you need valve job only on one valve I would take the head off and go buy some valve grinding compound, a new valve, valve seals and a spring compressor. Next put the head on a 5 gallon bucket so it will catch the valve if it falls. Make sure the valve doesn't move around in the valve guide otherwise you will have to take it to a machine shop to have new guides pressed in. If the guide is fine then take a cordless drill and spin the chuck onto the valve then put a good amount of compound on it and then seat the valve while spinning it. This will grind into the existing seat and make it new. Keep checking it and you will notice the surfaces of the valve and the seat becoming flush. At this point I would put all new valve stem seals on while you have it apart. Once all the imperfections are ground out and the valve is seated clean all parts and reassemble. Don't spend hundreds on a valve job that you don't need.

Dec 03, 2009 | 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

2 Answers

What could be the problem with a 1996 olds cierra 3.1 L no compression on # 6 cylinder,and how to fix thanks


Either two stuck valves or bad cylinder rings . More than likely stuck valves. Check the valve tappet clearance and check again.

Oct 13, 2009 | 1989 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera

2 Answers

When told your car needs a valve job, what does that mean


A valve job is removing the cylinder head(s) from the engine so the valves, guides and seats can be refurbished to restore compression and oil control. A valve job may be necessary by the time an engine has 80,000 or more miles on it, or to fix a "burned valve," compression or oil burning problem.
Before we describe all the steps that a typical valve job involves, we should warn you that some shops don't necessary do all the steps. In other words, you get what you pay for. A "cheapie" valve job might skip a lot of things that saves you a few dollars in the short run, but may end up costing you a lot more in the long run. So look for a shop or service facility that does quality work.
A valve job typically begins by disassembling, cleaning and inspecting the cylinder head. Cast iron heads are "Magnafluxed" to check for hairline cracks. This involves applying a strong magnetic field to the head and sprinkling iron powder on it. Cracks disrupt the magnetic field and attract the iron powder, making invisible cracks easy to see.
Cracks are bad news because they can leak coolant into the combustion chamber damaging the cylinders and/or causing the engine to lose coolant and overheat. If cracks are found in any critical areas of the head, the head must either be repaired or replaced. Cracks in cast iron heads are most often repaired by "pinning" (installing a series of overlapping threaded pins). Cracks in aluminum heads are very common and can often be repaired by welding.
If a head has been repaired (pinned or welded), most shops will usually pressure test the head afterward to make sure there are no leaks. Some may also apply a sealer compound to the inside of the water jackets as added insurance against future leaks.
Once the head passes this point, it is also checked for flatness. The surface of the head must be flat to seal the head gasket against the block. Excessive warpage, roughness or any damage can cause the head gasket to fail. If the head exceeds the maximum allowable out-of-flatness specs, it must be resurfaced or replaced. Usually there's enough metal in the head to allow for a certain amount of resurfacing. But on many import aluminum cylinder heads, the amount of resurfacing that's possible is minimal.
Overhead cam aluminum cylinder heads are often found to be warped (usually the result of overheating). If the condition cannot be corrected by resurfacing, the head can often be straightened by heating it in a special oven and then bending it until it is straight.
Next come the valves, guides and seats. The guides are checked for wear. They're almost always worn, so they either need to be replaced, relined or knurled (a process whereby grooves are cut into the inside diameter of the guides to decrease the bore size). Few shops knurl guides anymore. Most install new guides, guide liners or bore out the old guides to accept new valves with oversized stems. Aluminum heads have cast iron or bronze guides that can be replaced but most cast iron heads do not.
If the valves are to be reused, they will be inspected, checked for straightness then refaced. Many shops automatically replace all the exhaust valves to reduce the risk of failure (exhaust valves run much hotter than intakes and are much more likely to fail).
The seats in the head are either cut or ground to restore the sealing surface. If a seat is cracked or too badly worn to be refaced, the seat must be replaced. If that isn't possible (as is the case on many late model cast iron heads because the casting is too thin), then the entire head must be replaced. All aluminum heads have hardened steel seats that can be replaced.
The valve springs are all inspected and tested to make sure they are still capable of maintaining proper pressure. The spring retainers, keepers and other hardware is likewise inspected. Any worn or damaged components are replaced. New valve guide seals are always used.
The valves are then installed in the head and shimmed to restore proper valve height. This is necessary because machining the valves and seat alters their dimensions. Valve height is important because it affects valvetrain geometry and guide wear. If it is an overhead cam engine, the cam is also installed and the valve lash adjusted prior to returning the head to the customer

Sep 18, 2009 | 1992 Toyota Tercel

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