Question about 1994 Lincoln Mark VIII

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Overheats while driving stops when still cuts off

New wires and plugs altinator water pump belts hoses, still overheating, check eng light comes on when moving not still. missing sputtering sound, also exhaust leak near manifold. why is it cutting off.

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  • daddys8 Dec 10, 2008

    old filter housing started leaking motor ran out of old replaced gasket motor knocking on bottom end 1994 mark v111

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What EEC IV engine control trouble codes do you have? sounds like you have a mechanical problem, run a cylinder compession test and have the engine tested for a blown cylinder head gasket.

Posted on Dec 02, 2008

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How do i find out whats causing my car to overheat


How to Troubleshoot an Overheating Engine By Deanna Sclar from Auto Repair For Dummies, 2nd Edition
1 of 9 in Series: The Essentials of Checking and Maintaining Your Vehicle's Cooling System The first sign of a vehicle overheating is either when the needle on the temperature gauge pushes its way into the ominous red zone or the "Check Engine" or "Temperature" malfunction indicator light on the dashboard casts a sinister glow. Left alone, the liquid in the radiator eventually boils over, and steam rolls out from under the hood.
If your vehicle overheats often and constantly loses coolant, the problem may be leaks in your cooling system. If your vehicle overheats in normal weather and traffic, you may need to add liquid to the system, replace the thermostat, adjust or replace the accessory belt, or check the water pump.
The first thing to check if your vehicle overheats often is the pressure cap. Sometimes the gasket on the cap deteriorates and lets pressure escape, which causes the cooling system to malfunction. Most service stations can test your cap for you and tell you whether it's in good condition.
Some overheating problems aren't related to the cooling system at all. Here are some other circumstances that can cause a vehicle to overheat:
  • Late timing: If your ignition system is malfunctioning, late timing may be causing your vehicle to overheat because the spark plugs are firing the fuel/air mixture after the piston moves back down from the top of its stroke. Late timing alone doesn't cause an engine to overheat by more than a few degrees, but when coupled with other problems, it can bring the engine temperature to a critical point. Have a service facility place your vehicle on an electronic diagnostic machine to check your timing and adjust it if necessary.
  • Plugged radiator: Because plugged radiators cut down on the system's liquid circulation, the system can't cool efficiently. The remedy is to have a radiator specialist remove and inspect the radiator. If you're lucky, just steam-cleaning the radiator does the job; if you're not, the solution may be more expensive.
  • Slipping accessory belt: If you can see and reach the accessory belt that drives the water pump, check to be sure that there's no more than about 1?2 inch of give. If the belt seems loose or frayed, you can try to replace it. If you can't do the job, have a professional deal with it.
  • Collapsing bottom radiator hose: Occasionally, a bottom radiator hose begins to collapse under the vacuum that the water pump creates, and the impaired circulation causes overheating.
  • Low oil level: A vehicle that's low on oil tends to overheat because the oil removes from 75 to 80 percent of the "waste heat" in your engine (in addition to doing its other job of cushioning the moving engine parts).
If you're one quart low in oil and your vehicle holds five quarts, the oil will carry away 20 percent less heat than it should.
Under normal circumstances, you can prevent overheating by checking the level of liquid in the system and maintaining it properly.

How to Troubleshoot an Overheating Engine

5 Ways to Tell Your Car is Overheating

My Car is Overheating What Could be Wrong What Do Do

Jul 30, 2015 | 2004 Kia Sedona EX

1 Answer

Drive belt tension shaking mercury mastique


Just because you replace hose, this should not have overheated engine. You need new automatic tensioner pulley.

Because you overheat, you need to have a pressure test done, you could have warped the heads.

Replace tensioner, get pressure test, make sure coolant level is right, check to make sure fan's come on when engine reaches temp after thermostat opens. Now after all test check ok, belt not slipping, see if you still lose power.

Apr 03, 2013 | 1996 Mercury Mystique

1 Answer

My 92 Ford Explorer just started over heating.........Just put new radiator in it because it was leaking........after radiator got put in overheated again..........we think it is air locked.took the...


If the cooling system has no bleeder valves to vent air, you may have to temporarily loosen a heater hose to get all the air out of the system...Also check to see if there is water in the oil...If there is water in the oil then it could have a head gasket problem..Did you ever replace the thermostat? If it is stuck then it would also cause overheating...Excessive exhaust backpressure because of a clogged catalytic converter could also cause overheating..Also check belt tension and condition. A loose belt that slips may prevent the water pump from circulating coolant fast enough and/or the fan from turning fast for proper cooling...Another thing it could be is a faulty Water pump -- Any wobble in the pump shaft or seepage would call for replacement. In some instances, a pump can cause an engine to overheat if the impeller vanes are badly eroded due to corrosion or if the impeller has come loose from the shaft. The wrong pump may also cause an engine to overheat. Some engines with serpentine drive belts require a special water pump that turns in the opposite direction of those used on the same engine with ordinary V-belts... Also check the Fan -- With mechanical fans, most overheating problems are caused by a faulty fan clutch, though a missing fan shroud can reduce the fan's cooling effectiveness by as much as 50% (depending on the fan's distance from the radiator) which may be enough to cause the engine to overheat in hot weather or when working hard.

Apr 18, 2009 | Ford Explorer Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Overheating


The thermostat is behind the upper radiator hose...remove the upper radiator hose and loosen and then remove the two bolts on the outlet (where the upper radiator hose ends) The thermostat is inside that outlet...Another thing to check is if there is water in the oil...If there is water in the oil then it could have a head gasket problem..Did you ever replace the thermostat? If it is stuck then it would also cause overheating...Excessive exhaust backpressure because of a clogged catalytic converter could also cause overheating..Also check belt tension and condition. A loose belt that slips may prevent the water pump from circulating coolant fast enough and/or the fan from turning fast for proper cooling...Another thing it could be is a faulty Water pump -- Any wobble in the pump shaft or seepage would call for replacement. In some instances, a pump can cause an engine to overheat if the impeller vanes are badly eroded due to corrosion or if the impeller has come loose from the shaft. The wrong pump may also cause an engine to overheat. Some engines with serpentine drive belts require a special water pump that turns in the opposite direction of those used on the same engine with ordinary V-belts... Also check the Fan -- With mechanical fans, most overheating problems are caused by a faulty fan clutch, though a missing fan shroud can reduce the fan's cooling effectiveness by as much as 50% (depending on the fan's distance from the radiator) which may be enough to cause the engine to overheat in hot weather or when working hard.

Feb 28, 2009 | 1997 Nissan Maxima

1 Answer

Car overheating


First, plastic tube may be the overflow vent from the coolant bottle.Check to see where the attached end goes. You are going to have to check engine for coolant leaks (carefully refill system without spilling anything, then look for dripping anywhere. Look for leaks from all hoses, fittings radiator, water pump etc) After checking for leaks, start it up and check again (watch where you put your hands though) While running, check that the fan comes on when the vehicle reaches operating temp.(no fan, check fan motor, sensor & relay) Turn the heat on (does it have heat?) Check temp of lower hose and upper hose. If overheat happens, is lower hose still cold? (likely bad thermostat). If you found a leak, replace whatever is leaking...best insurance is to change thermostat after any overheat. Last, is there any white smoke from tailpipe, does engine run rough? If so, could be a failed head gasket or crack in cylinder head. (at this point last thing to worry about unless there is excessive smoke or rough run or oil in radiator or coolant in oil).

Feb 24, 2009 | 1998 Oldsmobile Intrigue

3 Answers

1996 Rodeo overheating


Check to see if there is water in the oil...If there is water in the oil then it could have a head gasket problem..Did you ever replace the thermostat? If it is stuck then it would also cause overheating...Excessive exhaust backpressure because of a clogged catalytic converter could also cause overheating..Also check belt tension and condition. A loose belt that slips may prevent the water pump from circulating coolant fast enough and/or the fan from turning fast for proper cooling...Another thing it could be is a faulty Water pump -- Any wobble in the pump shaft or seepage would call for replacement. In some instances, a pump can cause an engine to overheat if the impeller vanes are badly eroded due to corrosion or if the impeller has come loose from the shaft. The wrong pump may also cause an engine to overheat. Some engines with serpentine drive belts require a special water pump that turns in the opposite direction of those used on the same engine with ordinary V-belts... Also check the Fan -- With mechanical fans, most overheating problems are caused by a faulty fan clutch, though a missing fan shroud can reduce the fan's cooling effectiveness by as much as 50% (depending on the fan's distance from the radiator) which may be enough to cause the engine to overheat in hot weather or when working hard.

Dec 16, 2008 | 1996 Isuzu Rodeo

1 Answer

Toyota corolla engine stopped


hey, this isnt a solution (i dont think), just a comment, the corolla is equipped with a timing chain, located inside the engine with the cams, the belt that you see is a serpentine belt to run all other components like the altinator, water pump and ac. just letting you know. Hope this info is helpful!

Dec 10, 2008 | 1998 Toyota Corolla

1 Answer

Troubleshooting overheating problems in 1997 Toyota Corolla?


Ok first check the water pump and if that is ok sounds like the head gasket blown, look for water in the oi, thisl will be like a milky colour

Dec 01, 2008 | 1997 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

1990 ford ranger is overheating


If the cooling system has no bleeder valves to vent air, you may have to temporarily loosen a heater hose to get all the air out of the system...Also check to see if there is water in the oil...If there is water in the oil then it could have a head gasket problem....Excessive exhaust backpressure because of a clogged catalytic converter could also cause overheating..Also check belt tension and condition. A loose belt that slips may prevent the water pump from circulating coolant fast enough and/or the fan from turning fast for proper cooling...Another thing it could be is a faulty Water pump -- Any wobble in the pump shaft or seepage would call for replacement. In some instances, a pump can cause an engine to overheat if the impeller vanes are badly eroded due to corrosion or if the impeller has come loose from the shaft. The wrong pump may also cause an engine to overheat. Some engines with serpentine drive belts require a special water pump that turns in the opposite direction of those used on the same engine with ordinary V-belts... Also check the Fan -- With mechanical fans, most overheating problems are caused by a faulty fan clutch, though a missing fan shroud can reduce the fan's cooling effectiveness by as much as 50% (depending on the fan's distance from the radiator) which may be enough to cause the engine to overheat in hot weather or when working hard.

Oct 20, 2008 | 1998 Oldsmobile Bravada

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