Question about 1995 Buick Riviera

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Power Steering My power steering line has a leak in it. Would I be able to simply patch this or do I have to replace it? Also, I want to do all of the work myself, so if anyone can explain/push me in the right direction to either replacing or patching the line, that would be great.

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You probably cannot patch it very easily. I would recommend replacing. This too is usually not very difficult, Make sure car is not running and find the two ends of the particular line in question. You'll need a hydraulic fitting wrench (looks like a normal crescent wrench, but gets better grip and won't strip it as easily). Autozone has them or can help. Take off the affected line and replace with new one. You may not find one at normal parts outlet and have to go back to dealer. Make sure you put plenty of fluid back in reservoir before restarting. After restarting for a minute, recheck fluid level and refill again if necessary. You may have to do this a few times to work out any air in the system.

Posted on Dec 02, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Why does my van's power steering fluid leak out as quickly as added if the van is running?


Burst power steering hose.
Cracked power steering hard line.
Bad seal in power steering pump.
Lose fittings on power steering lines.
Check power steering components for signs of leaking fluid.

Apr 11, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

Power Steering Pump Noise


As you turn your steering wheel it is this fluid pressure that aids in turning the wheels of your car. ... If the pump impeller is trying to move power steering fluid and starts catching air bubbles it can cause whining noises and vibrations to occur.
Maybe you've heard it at a stop light. Maybe you've heard it as you pass a car on the freeway. Or maybe you've heard it in the parking lot at work when someone is leaving. The unmistakable whine of a power steering pump can make even the most confident mechanic wonder when that car will breakdown.
Power steering pump noise is a unique noise that your car may make and once you've heard it you always know what it is. The noise is a mix of a whirring and a whining and will always vary with the speed of your engine whether your car is driving or in park. This whining noise can be subtle or extremely loud and may be worse in colder weather, or right when you first start your car.
Power steering pumps are most often vain style centrifugal pumps that are tasked with pressurizing the power steering fluid and pushing it down to your power steering gear or rack. As you turn your steering wheel it is this fluid pressure that aids in turning the wheels of your car.
There are a few reasons why you are hearing power steering pump noise from your car. First, it may simply be due to the design of the pump. Sometimes, noisy power steering pumps can continue to work flawlessly for years after they start making noise. This may simply be due to the manufacture's design or a tight tolerance in that particular pump. In this case, you would hear the noise but not see any other adverse effect like a loss in power steering, leaking fluid or a wobbly pulley. In this case, you may be able to help reduce your power steering pump noise by choosing a different type of power steering fluid, like a synthetic fluid.
Your power steering pump may also be making noises due to air trapped in the system. If the pump impeller is trying to move power steering fluid and starts catching air bubbles it can cause whining noises and vibrations to occur. Even tiny air bubbles you cannot see that are trapping in the power steering fluid may be causing the whining you are hearing. In this case, the best thing to do is flush your power steering system to try and remove the air from the system. Having air trapped in your power steering system can be difficult to diagnose so you may need to simply try a power steering flush to see if it solves your problem.
Power Steering pump noise may also be due to a failing power steering pump. As the bearings on the impeller go bad it will start to make noise as the pump is turning. If you have a bad power steering pump you usually will also experience leaks from around the pulley, a wobbly pulley, or difficulty turning the steering wheel when you are stopped. If you have multiple of these symptoms together, it is probably time to replace your power steering pump.
Lastly, and most usually, a whining power steering pump is an indication of a low fluid level. Your power steering fluid is probably something you have rarely if ever checked, so it often comes as a surprise if the level is low. Your power steering fluid reservoir is also relatively small so even a slow leak will cause a low fluid level relatively quickly. To confirm this is your problem it is as simple as checking your power steering fluid level. Some power steering reservoirs are clear so you can see through them to check how full they are. You may have to wipe away some dirt and grime to find the "full" line, but it should be easy to check. If you have an opaque power steering fluid reservoir there should be a small dipstick under the cap that will help you measure the fluid level. If it is low, then you have a leak somewhere and topping off the fluid should quite down your power steering pump.
If you discover a power steering leak, rather than simply continuing to add fluid every time it gets low, you should fix the problem permanently so you don't have to continue to check your power steering fluid level. Replacing lines or seals can be a surprisingly difficult task due to the location of your power steering pump and steering gear or rack. The easiest way to seal your leak is to do it from the inside out!

try this link out for more power steering problems.
Power steering whining sqreeching Google Search

on Dec 14, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Change the combination power steering hose which is leaking


Is it the power steering hose or a transmission line.Honda does not usually attach power steering lines to the radiator, but the transmission cooler lines are attached to the bottom of the radiator. If it is the transmission cooler line leaking, simply replace the line from the radiator to the transmission with 1/2 inch transmission line and some new clamps.May want to do both lines while you are making the repair.

Feb 22, 2015 | 1994 Honda Accord

1 Answer

Power steering line leaking?


Some pressure lines use an installation technique that if not followed properly will leak even though tight. Take it to an accredited power steering specialist shop to have the problem fixed..

Oct 06, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Power steering fluid leak in 99 Toyota Corolla


look for split in the hard line where fluid is leaking. If you see split, change the line only. make sure power steering reservoir is filled and rack and pinion is full (charge with steering wheel left/right motion). You should be able to remove wheel and inside wheel panel to see power steering fluid shooting out of any hole. There is hydraulic pressure on the lines.

Apr 03, 2014 | 2003 Kia Spectra

1 Answer

Power steering leak


with power-steering it could be one of three problems. 1- power steering pump could be going out ( normally with the pump the car will whine but will not normally leak and still hold fluid) 2- a leak in your power steering lines ( and can normally be resolved with new lines or sometimes you may be able to bypass and clamp the leak on the line) 3- you may have busted the O rings in your powersteering pump and that will actually cause the pump to leak

hint- alot of people will tell you that you may also use transmission fluid for power-steering this is true you can its that same thing as power-steering fluid just a different color (but dont put power-steering fluid in a transmission, but at the same time if you plan on replacing the pump i would use transmission fluid due to it being cheaper but it will cause the O rings in the power-steering pump to go out quicker to cause a worse leak) so i would recommend to locate the leak first before using trans fluid due to if its in a line you wont have to replace the pump but if its already the pump this is the cheapest fix until repaired

Jul 05, 2012 | 2000 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Power steering whining, sqreeching


hi Eva.
As you turn your steering wheel it is this fluid pressure that aids in turning the wheels of your car. ... If the pump impeller is trying to move power steering fluid and starts catching air bubbles it can cause whining noises and vibrations to occur.
Maybe you've heard it at a stop light. Maybe you've heard it as you pass a car on the freeway. Or maybe you've heard it in the parking lot at work when someone is leaving. The unmistakable whine of a power steering pump can make even the most confident mechanic wonder when that car will breakdown.
Power steering pump noise is a unique noise that your car may make and once you've heard it you always know what it is. The noise is a mix of a whirring and a whining and will always vary with the speed of your engine whether your car is driving or in park. This whining noise can be subtle or extremely loud and may be worse in colder weather, or right when you first start your car.
Power steering pumps are most often vain style centrifugal pumps that are tasked with pressurizing the power steering fluid and pushing it down to your power steering gear or rack. As you turn your steering wheel it is this fluid pressure that aids in turning the wheels of your car.
There are a few reasons why you are hearing power steering pump noise from your car. First, it may simply be due to the design of the pump. Sometimes, noisy power steering pumps can continue to work flawlessly for years after they start making noise. This may simply be due to the manufacture's design or a tight tolerance in that particular pump. In this case, you would hear the noise but not see any other adverse effect like a loss in power steering, leaking fluid or a wobbly pulley. In this case, you may be able to help reduce your power steering pump noise by choosing a different type of power steering fluid, like a synthetic fluid.
Your power steering pump may also be making noises due to air trapped in the system. If the pump impeller is trying to move power steering fluid and starts catching air bubbles it can cause whining noises and vibrations to occur. Even tiny air bubbles you cannot see that are trapping in the power steering fluid may be causing the whining you are hearing. In this case, the best thing to do is flush your power steering system to try and remove the air from the system. Having air trapped in your power steering system can be difficult to diagnose so you may need to simply try a power steering flush to see if it solves your problem.
Power Steering pump noise may also be due to a failing power steering pump. As the bearings on the impeller go bad it will start to make noise as the pump is turning. If you have a bad power steering pump you usually will also experience leaks from around the pulley, a wobbly pulley, or difficulty turning the steering wheel when you are stopped. If you have multiple of these symptoms together, it is probably time to replace your power steering pump.
Lastly, and most usually, a whining power steering pump is an indication of a low fluid level. Your power steering fluid is probably something you have rarely if ever checked, so it often comes as a surprise if the level is low. Your power steering fluid reservoir is also relatively small so even a slow leak will cause a low fluid level relatively quickly. To confirm this is your problem it is as simple as checking your power steering fluid level. Some power steering reservoirs are clear so you can see through them to check how full they are. You may have to wipe away some dirt and grime to find the "full" line, but it should be easy to check. If you have an opaque power steering fluid reservoir there should be a small dipstick under the cap that will help you measure the fluid level. If it is low, then you have a leak somewhere and topping off the fluid should quite down your power steering pump.
If you discover a power steering leak, rather than simply continuing to add fluid every time it gets low, you should fix the problem permanently so you don't have to continue to check your power steering fluid level. Replacing lines or seals can be a surprisingly difficult task due to the location of your power steering pump and steering gear or rack. The easiest way to seal your leak is to do it from the inside out!

or check this link out for more info on this matter.
Power steering whining sqreeching Google Search

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