Question about 1988 Ford Merkur XR4Ti

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Cooling system i own a ford sierra 2.3 v6 (taunus engine), the engine heats up to normal when in normal driving conditions, but when in slow traffic tends to heat up higher, i think it might be the visco fan unit or the thermostat. i am thinking of installing a electric fan, witch way does the water flow through the radiator? from bottom to top or top to bottom? what is the normal operating heat for that engine in degrees celcius. much thanks

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Its sounds like the water pump or vicous fan clutch, i agree and would install the electric fan tho, and the water flows top to bottom

Posted on Dec 02, 2008

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1994 Chrysler Lebaron Convertible In traffic with


If the cooling system is functional, yes.
The ac condenser adds heat to the air coming thru the radiator when the ac is on. If the engine cooling system is weak, the extra heat will make the engine run hot.
Low coolant flow thru the radiator is a common cause.

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Clutch burning smell in slow traffic


TAKE IT BACK RIGHT AWAY. if im correct switch i mite not be but i think that year ford owned jag. ford transmissions are known for having bad cooling system(over heating) for the trans causing bad vavle boxs in the trans causing that buring smell. you do not want to pick up that cost out of pocket. i did:(

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While driving in slow, bumber to bumber traffic, engine starts to overheat


could be the system is low or lack of maintenence look at condition of coolant
check to see if the cooling fan is working. fan works from a sensor turning it on/off
at proper temperatures

Jun 28, 2011 | 2004 Kia Sorento

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Do you drive with o/d on or off for normal driving when do you use it


You can drive with the switch on or off, it doesn't matter. Most vehicles default to the "on" position every time the engine is started, I'm not sure if yours does. The reason you can select the O/D off is because in some driving conditions the transmission will shift in and out of overdrive several times and it gets a little annoying. These conditions could be while driving up a grade at freeway speeds or driving at close to normal speeds but in heavy traffic. Every time the transmission shifts, it generates a little heat. Normally that heat is dissapated through the cooling system, but if the transmission keeps shifting in and out of overdrive, expecially in heavy traffic or climbing a grade, the cooling system may have a hard time keeping up. If you feel the transmission shifting in and out of overdrive more than usual, and you're in an abnormal traffic condition, go ahead and turn the O/D off. Just remember to turn it back on again when traffic returns to normal so you can get the best fuel mileage.

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Fan doesn't run while in idle and begins to over heat until I start driving agin then it cools back down to normal. Also the fan runs when engine is off and drains the battery.


The fan is only supposed to come on when there is excess heat .. in normal driving conditions it doesn't start. When you start your car in the morning the fan won't come on because the engine is cold.

With a hot engine - and it depends how hot the engine is - the fan will only kick in to prevent overheating. In heavy slow moving traffic or a traffic jam, the fan will kick in if needed.

The air flow through the radiator is usually sufficient -in normal driving conditions - to cool the engine.

When you park up and the car has a hot engine, the fan will kick in. This is perfectly normal. It is caused by a surge of hot coolant triggering the fan sensor. Perfectly normal.

The fan then should cut out after a while .. maybe 2-3 minutes at the most. If the fan runs continuously that suggests a fault in the temperature sensor switch.

Next time - wait by the car and see how long it takes for the fan to quit after you have parked up. It should stop of its own accord after a couple of minutes.

If the fan cuts off after a short while, and your battery is becoming drained, that's probably a battery or alternator fault.

Remember: when you start the car the fan won't kick in at idle speed because the engine is COLD, and there is no reason for the fan to start up ..
The fan WILL kick in for a couple of minutes after you have parked the vehicle and the engine is hot

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When idling my jeep overheats. The cooling fan is running and it speeds up when temperature goes up. The temperature gets close to 260 degrees and the engine tries to stall. when I start moving it cools...


At idling speed an engine does build up a lot of heat and the cooling fan will kick in. In slow moving traffic or traffic jams the temperature gauge can touch the red - particularly on hot days. The reason it cools down when you start moving is because of the air flow through the radiator.

Presumably there are no leaks from the cooling system otherwise you would have mentioned it. In normal circumstances the fan will not be running as you are driving at speed, as the air-flow through the radiator is sufficient to cool things. The fan only kicks in to get rid of excess heat - and this usually occurs at idling speed or after you have parked the car.

If the fan is running all the time as you drive, this points to either a fault in the fan switch, or the car is running too hot. presumably in normal driving the fan isn't running and the temperature gauge reads normal?

It is common - in stationary traffic many cars overheat (particularly big engined models) try to stall and 'cut out'. Restarting can be difficult until the engine cools down.

Is your car overheating in normal driving conditions or just at idle speed? Overheating in normal driving conditions can be caused by things like a failing water pump, blocked radiator, collapsed hose, faulty thermostat or, in the worst case scenario, cylinder head problems.

Overheating at idling speed is 'common'. Check your coolant level. If your car isn't using/losing coolant then there probably is no major problem. You can flush out the cooling system and refill with new coolant - and also check your radiator. Are the cooling fins crumbling with age? Or maybe they're partly clogged with insects and debris from the road? A blast with a hosepipe wil sort that out ..

The question is how much does your car overheat in normal driving? If it doesn't .. it appears as though you have nothing to worry about as such. Most cars have 2 speed fans... the 2nd faster stage kicks in at some point dependant on engine temperature. Perfectly normal.

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1 Answer

GMC Sierra 1500 power loss at 1/2 throttle and above


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