Question about 2000 Pontiac Grand Am GT

11 Answers

Engine overheats The heater air turns cold and the temperature gauge gradually gets hot. The coolant light does not come on. i have to stop for a few minutes otherwise the engine will boil the water out. Put a new cap on and replaced the thermostat. 3.4 engine.

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  • 5 more comments 
  • rwendel Nov 27, 2008

    NOTHING IS HAPPENING ON MY EMAIL.

  • rwendel Nov 27, 2008

    tHE COOLANT LEVEL IS FINE.

  • rwendel Nov 27, 2008

    tHE COOLANT STAYS IN THE ENGINE AND RADIATOR.

  • rwendel Nov 27, 2008

    NO LEAKS OF COOLANT ANYWHERE.

  • rwendel Dec 19, 2008

    is there some kind of sensor someplace?

  • rwendel Dec 19, 2008

    start at the begining

  • rwendel Dec 22, 2008

    did not solve the problem

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11 Answers

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The thermostat may be your problem. Remove the thermostat and check it when it is cold to see that it is closed. Put the thermostat in a pan of hot water on a stove. The thermostat should be open when the water is near boiling. If the thermostat is okay, the temperature sensor may be your problem.
We think your problem is a low coolant level. With the engine cold, and we mean cold, open the radiator cap (not the overflow cap) and it should be clear full. If not, fill it to the top. Over the next couple of days, check for coolant leaks under the car when parked.

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

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  • mohammed marika thambi
    mohammed marika thambi Nov 27, 2008

    The cooling system in your car should
    automatically pull the coolant into the radiator
    as the engine cools. You possibly have a
    faulty or incorrect radiator cap or you may have
    a small leak somewhere in the cooling system
    allowing air back into the cooling system as the
    engine cools off. The cooling system must
    be air-tight in order to pull the coolant out of
    the overflow reservoir.




    have the cooling
    system serviced, flushing the radiator,
    replacing the thermostat and adding new coolant.

  • mohammed marika thambi
    mohammed marika thambi Nov 27, 2008

    Check for a partially
    plugged radiator. When the engine overheated sludge or
    debris may have been dislodged and plugged the radiator.
    Replace the
    radiator with new to repair problem.




  • mohammed marika thambi
    mohammed marika thambi Nov 27, 2008

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The thermostat check is required and the main thing which needs attention is the engine radiator fan that should be serviced for the slow running coil.May be the coil needs replacement which check the speed of the fan.

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

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On the 3400 you have to bled air out of system. on top front right of eng. there is a brass bleeder . with engine running open bleeder let out air until fluid starts coming out ..this is a common problem on the 3400 ..air inthe system will cause it to overheat & the air to go cold from the heater.

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

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Hi and welcome to FixYa,

Your post/description are significant:

  • the heater air turns cold - heated water/coolant from the engine cooling system is not flowing through the heater core;
  • temperature gauge gradually gets hot - coolant is not circulating and restricted in one area not reaching the radiator. Temp sensor detects and shows on the gauge;
  • coolant light does not come on - the coolant light will only come on if there is insufficient coolant in the reservoir;
  • engine will boil the water out - engine is overheating, coolant is not circulating.
Based on the above presumptions, probable components that would require check/replacement:
  • thermostat;
  • waterpump;
  • fanbelt.
Just a start, do postback how things turned up or should you need additional information. Good luck and Thank you for using FixYa.

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

  • 2 more comments 
  • Louie  Role
    Louie Role Nov 27, 2008

    Could it have been that the new thermostat was installed the other way around? Some thermostats have a specific mounting/installing position.

  • Louie  Role
    Louie Role Nov 27, 2008

    You can verify if the thermostat is the culprit; when the same occurs, is coolant or vapor rushing back into the reservoir? If yes the overheated coolant is reaching the radiator; if not, then the overheated coolant is restricted to the engine side. The thermostat is not working properly.

  • Louie  Role
    Louie Role Dec 22, 2008

    The thermostat is relatively not that expensive, might you have it replaced even if new and ensure that it is fitted correctly.

  • Louie  Role
    Louie Role Dec 24, 2008

    Any updates? Perhaps after the holidays. But hey, Merry Christmas!

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  • 306 Answers

I suppose it needs new radiator

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

  • AbdulRahiman S Nov 27, 2008

    else  replace the water pump ,fill the system with dex cool anti-freeze. The car still overheated means all the factors mentioned earlier can singly and collectively contribute to that issue. I recommend that the vehicle be pressure tested to determine the condition of the cooling system, head, and engine. If everything seems fine, check the heated core. Replacing the coolant reservoir cap is cheap and can also be your problem.


  • AbdulRahiman S Nov 27, 2008

    or  flush the radiator..?Depending on engine size , some can really be a problem on bleeding the system , could be an air pocket in the system.

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It sounds to me like the heater core is out. Have you noticed the floor wet recently? that's a sure sign of heater core issues. The other option is it will act like that if it has no antifreeze or water in the radiator, in other words the radiator is dry.
ust a suggestion if someone has replaced the thermostat its possible they installed it pointing in the wrong direction this could account for cold air and the guage reading over hot.

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

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When the car engine  over heats its your head gaskets. also It sounds more like a stuck thermostat, faulty water pump or plugged radiator. 

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

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  • jamesrated Nov 27, 2008

    CAUSES OF OVERHEATING
    Overheating can be caused by anything that decreases the cooling system's ability to absorb, transport and dissipate heat: A low coolant level, a coolant leak (through internal or external leaks), poor heat conductivity inside the engine because of accumulated deposits in the water jackets, a defective thermostat that doesn't open, poor airflow through the radiator, a slipping fan clutch, an inoperative electric cooling fan, a collapsed lower radiator hose, an eroded or loose water pump impeller, or even a defective radiator cap.
    One of nature's basic laws says that heat always flows from an area of higher temperature to an area of lesser temperature, never the other way around. The only way to cool hot metal, therefore, is to keep it in constant contact with a cooler liquid. And the only way to do that is to keep the coolant in constant circulation. As soon as the circulation stops, either because of a problem with the water pump, thermostat or loss of coolant, temperatures begin to rise and the engine starts to overheat.
    The coolant also has to get rid of the heat it soaks up while passing through the block and head(s). So the radiator must be capable of doing its job, which requires the help of an efficient cooling fan at slow speeds.
    The thermostat must be doing its job to keep the engine's average temperature within the normal range. If the thermostat fails to open, it will effectively block the flow of coolant and the engine will overheat.
    Your engine may not be overheating at all. Your temperature gauge or warning lamp may be coming on because of a faulty coolant sensor. Sometimes this can be caused by a low coolant level or air trapped under the sensor.
    WHAT TO CHECK
    Thermostat -- Severe overheating can often damage a good thermostat. If the engine has overheated because of another problem, therefore, the thermostat should be tested or replaced before the engine is returned to service.
    One way to check the thermostat is to start the engine and feel the upper radiator hose (or use an infrared noncontact thermometer to read its temperature). The hose should not feel uncomfortably hot until the engine has warmed-up and the thermostat opens. If the hose does not get hot, it means the thermostat is not opening.
    Another way to test the thermostat is to remove it and dip it into a pan of boiling water (it should open). The exact opening temperature can be checked by using a thermometer.
    If the thermostat needs to be replaced, install one with the same temperature rating as the original. Most cars and light trucks since 1971 require thermostats with 192 or 195 degree ratings. Using a cooler thermostat (160 or 180) in an attempt to "cure" a tendency to overheat can increase fuel and oil consumption, ring wear and emissions. On newer vehicles with computerized engine controls, the wrong thermostat can prevent the computer system from going into closed loop resulting in major performance and emission problems if the engine fails to reach its normal operating temperature.
    and more options i m sending just check out my another comments below this 1.





  • jamesrated Nov 27, 2008

    TIP:when refiling the cooling system, air can become trapped under the thermostat. This will form a steam pocket that prevents the thermostat from opening and may cause the engine to overheat. Some cooling systems have one or more bleeder valves that can be opened to vent air from the system while refilling the system. If your cooling system does not have a bleeder valve, you can drill a small hole in the thermostat as shown. This will allow air to escape past the thermostat so it is not trapped inside the engine block. Some thermostats come with a similar feature called a "jiggle valve." There is a small hole in the thermostat with a pin that allows air to escape.
    For a good step-by-step overview on how to replace a thermostat, Click Here

     Cooling system leaks -- Loss of coolant because of a coolant leak is probably the most common cause of overheating. Possible leak points include hoses, the radiator, heater core, water pump, thermostat housing, head gasket, freeze plugs, automatic transmission oil cooler, cylinder head(s) and block.
    Make a careful visual inspection of the entire cooling system, and then PRESSURE TEST the cooling system and radiator cap. A pressure test will reveal internal leaks such as seepage past the head gasket as well as cracks in the head or block. A good system should hold 12 to 15 psi for 15 minutes or more with no loss in pressure. If it leaks pressure, there is an internal coolant leak (most likely a bad head gasket but possibly also a cracked cylinder or engine block).
    It's important to pressure test the radiator cap, too, because a weak cap (or one with too low a pressure rating for the application) will lower the coolant's boiling point and can allow coolant to escape from the radiator.
    Fan -- With mechanical fans, most overheating problems are caused by a faulty fan clutch, though a missing fan shroud can reduce the fan's cooling effectiveness by as much as 50% (depending on the fan's distance from the radiator) which may be enough to cause the engine to overheat in hot weather or when working hard.
    Defective fan clutches are a common and often overlooked cause of overheating. The shear characteristics of the clutch fluid gradually deteriorates over time, with an average loss in drive efficiency of about 200 rpm per year. Eventually slippage reaches the point where effective cooling is no longer possible and overheating results. (On average, the life of a fan clutch is about the same as a water pump. If one needs to be replaced, the other usually does too.)
    If the fan clutch shows signs of fluid leakage (oily streaks radiating outward from the hub of the clutch), spins freely with little or no resistance when the engine is off, or wobbles when the fan is pushed in or out, it needs to be replaced.
    With an electric cooling fan, check to see that the fan cycles on when the engine gets hot and when the air conditioner is on. If the fan fails to come on, check the fan motor wiring connections, fan relay and temperature sensor. Try jumping the fan directly to the battery. If it runs, the problem is in the wiring, relay or sensor. If it fails to run, the fan motor is bad and needs to be replaced.
    With a hydraulic cooling fan, the fan must be turning fast enough to provide adequate cooling at idle and low speed.
    Water pump -- Any wobble in the pump shaft or seepage would call for replacement. In some instances, a pump can cause an engine to overheat if the impeller vanes are badly eroded due to corrosion or if the impeller has come loose from the shaft. The wrong pump may also cause an engine to overheat. Some engines with serpentine drive belts require a special water pump that turns in the opposite direction of those used on the same engine with ordinary V-belts.




  • jamesrated Nov 27, 2008

    It does not happen very often, but sometimes the water pump impeller can loosen up on the pump shaft and not turn, although the water pump pulley appears to be turning normally. If the impeller does not spin, there will be little or no circulation of coolant through the engine. The only way to know if this is the problem is to remove the water pump and check the impeller to see that is is tight on the shaft. Also, some plastic impellers can become severely eroded over time. So can the water pump housing. The loss of blade area or an increase in clearance between the housing and impeller will reduce the flow of coolant and can lead to overheating.
    Belts & hoses -- Check belt tension and condition. A loose belt that slips may prevent the water pump from circulating coolant fast enough and/or the fan from turning fast for proper cooling.
    The condition of the hoses should also be checked. Recommend new hoses if the old ones are over 5 years old.
    Sometimes a lower radiator hose will collapse under vacuum at high speed and restrict the flow of coolant from the radiator into the engine. This can happen if the reinforcing spring inside the hose is missing or damaged.
    Radiator -- The most common problems radiators fall prey to are clogging (both internal and external) and leaks. Dirt, bugs and debris can block air flow through the core and reduce the radiator's ability to dissipate heat. Internal corrosion and an accumulation of deposits can likewise inhibit coolant circulation and reduce cooling. A good way to find clogs is to use an infrared thermometer to "scan" the surface of the radiator for cold spots. If clogged, the radiator should be removed for cleaning or replaced. Backflushing the cooling system and/or using chemical cleaners can remove rust and hard water scale, but may do little to open up a clogged radiator.
    When refilling the cooling system, be sure you get it completely full. Air pockets in the head(s), heater core and below the thermostat can interfere with proper coolant circulation and cooling. If the cooling system has no bleeder valves to vent air, you may have to temporarily loosen a heater hose to get all the air out of the system.

    Excessive exhaust backpressure. A clogged catalytic converter is usually the culprit here, but don't overlook the possibility of a crushed pipe or a collapsed double wall pipe. Check intake vacuum at idle. If intake vacuum reads low and continues to drop, inspect the exhaust system.

    Overheated incoming air. On older vehicles with a carburetor or throttle body injection, check the operation of the heated air intake system on the air cleaner. If the temperature control valve is stuck so only heated air from around the exhaust manifold is drawn into the air cleaner, it may contribute to detonation and/or overheating. Also check the heat riser valve for manifold heat on older V6 and V8 engines. If stuck shut, it may be overheating the intake manifold.

    Dragging brakes. A caliper that's sticking or a parking brake that isn't releasing may be making the engine work too hard.
    Overworking the engine. The cooling systems in many passenger cars today are marginal and have little excess capacity to handle extra heat generated by towing or high speed mountain driving in hot weather.

    http://www.aa1car.com/library/overheat.h...

    click this link for more help with proper pictures.



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Have you filled the radiator with water?

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

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  • Lee Hodgson
    Lee Hodgson Nov 27, 2008

    Overheating can be caused by anything that
    decreases the cooling system's ability to absorb, transport and
    dissipate heat: A low coolant level, a coolant leak
    (through internal or external leaks), poor heat conductivity inside the
    engine because of accumulated deposits in the water jackets, a
    defective thermostat that doesn't open, poor airflow through the
    radiator, a slipping fan clutch, an inoperative electric cooling fan, a
    collapsed lower radiator hose, an eroded or loose water pump impeller,
    or even a defective radiator cap., check all of these

  • Lee Hodgson
    Lee Hodgson Nov 27, 2008

    The most common problems radiators fall
    prey to are clogging (both internal and external) and leaks. Dirt, bugs
    and debris can block air flow through the core and reduce the
    radiator's ability to dissipate heat. Internal corrosion and an
    accumulation of deposits can likewise inhibit coolant circulation and
    reduce cooling. A good way to find clogs is to use an infrared
    thermometer to "scan" the surface of the radiator for cold spots. If
    clogged, the radiator should be removed for cleaning or replaced.
    Backflushing the cooling system and/or using chemical cleaners can
    remove rust and hard water scale, but may do little to open up a
    clogged radiator.

  • Lee Hodgson
    Lee Hodgson Nov 27, 2008

    When refilling the cooling system, be sure
    you get it completely full. Air pockets in the head(s), heater core and
    below the thermostat can interfere with proper coolant circulation and
    cooling. If the cooling system has no bleeder valves to vent air, you
    may have to temporarily loosen a heater hose to get all the air out of
    the system.

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If the thermostat is new (and good), there's no leak in coolant, the radiator isn't gunked up and the head gaskets are good, then I'd start looking at either your fan or, more likely, your water pump.

I'd lean towards the water pump. Water pumps fail with a degree of regularity. You said that it "won't keep coolant in". Often, when the bearings in the water pump go bad, it will start to leak from the vent hole or impeller shaft hole. It can also leak from the water pump gasket. Do you see any spots of antifreeze on the ground after you've had the car parked for a while? Do you hear any "grinding" when the car is running? Also check the front of the engine (the side with the belt(s)) to see if you can detect any coolant or the smell of coolant. Either way, the water pump is what circulates the coolant through the engine, and when it goes... you overheat.

The fan is also of concern. If the electric fan is burned out, then it's not going to draw in air to cool the antifreeze in the radiator. I'd also check the temperature sensor -- if that doesn't register properly, then the fan may not engage.

Good luck.

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

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There could be a leak in your radiator check this part...another reason why cars overheat is that antifreeze is not circulating through the engine as it should. Antifreeze serves two purposes. It not only keeps the engine temperature level during the winter ( preventing the engine from freezing) , it also keeps cars from overheating during the warmer months. It's always a good idea to periodically look under one's car to see if there are any materials dripping from the car or if your car leaves any puddles or stains when parked.

If your car overheats. Keep your eyes on the temperature gauge and never let the needle move into the red. Pull over before it gets too hot.

Steps:
1. Turn off the engine.

2. Wait. If the engine is steaming, don't open the hood.

3. Pull the hood release lever under the dashboard to open the hood when the car has cooled completely.

4. Walk around the front of the car, reach under the hood, find the latch and squeeze it. As you squeeze the latch, pull up and open the hood.

5. Check the coolant reservoir tank first. It's a plastic jug that has a small hose running to the radiator. The reservoir can be filled when the engine is hot (except on German and Swedish cars, the plastic reservoir is also under pressure, so don't open when the engine is hot).

6. Open the radiator cap with a rag. Remember: open it only after the engine has completely cooled. If you're not sure, don't open the cap. If you open the cap while it's still warm, you may burn yourself with steam or hot coolant. Open the cap slowly, as if you were opening a bottle of soda that has been shaken up.

7. Examine the radiator. Look inside and see if there's coolant left. If needed, fill to the top of the radiator.

8. Put the radiator cap back on.

9. Check to see that the upper or lower radiator hose, or any of the heater hoses, hasn't burst.

10. Restart the engine.

11. Watch the temperature gauge obsessively. Don't let the needle go into the red. Turn off the engine if the gauge approaches the red zone.

12. Understand that you can continue driving a high-temperature vehicle if you're far from a phone or a service station and the car does not need coolant (or does not respond to these instructions). However, drive only as long as you stop and turn off the engine whenever the gauge gets close to the red, and let the engine cool down until you drive again. This may take a long time, but it probably beats walking.

Tips:
Overheating can be caused by factors other than low coolant level (thermostat stuck closed, blocked radiator, malfunctioning fan or failed water pump). If the coolant level isn't low, it's time to visit a mechanic.

It's OK to add just plain water or antifreeze in an overheating, emergency situation. When routinely adding or changing coolant, always use a 50-50 mixture of water and antifreeze.

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

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It seems like the radiator of your car needs attention. check for coolant level in it, when its cold. if les add some coolant and then see if the problem persists.

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

  • 2 more comments 
  • futureloginn
    futureloginn Nov 27, 2008

    Ok, than there are chances of chocking in the coolant pipes, may be they not reached to engine.. 


  • futureloginn
    futureloginn Nov 27, 2008

    Check the chock,, that it is not turned on.


  • futureloginn
    futureloginn Nov 27, 2008

    May be sum loosing nut in engine.


  • futureloginn
    futureloginn Nov 27, 2008

    next??


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YOU NEED BLEED AIR OUT THE COOLING SYSTEM.WAIT TO ENGINE COOL DOWN.YOUR VECHICLE YOU HAVE TO POUR COOLANT IN THE COOLANT OVERFLOW JUG UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL STAY AT THE FULL COLD MARK.THEN START ENGINE LET IT IDLE A FEW MINUTES WATCH COOLANT IN THE OVERFLOW JUG WHEN IT DROPS ADD MORE COOLANT UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL STAY AT FULL COLD MARK.WHEN COOLANT LEVEL STOP DROPPING IN OVERFLOW JUG.SCREW RADIATOR CAP BACK ON OVERFLOW JUG WATCH ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE GAUGE AS COOLANT TEMPERATURE START CLIMBING TURN OFF ENGINE LET IT SET A WHILE KEEP FROM GETTING SCALDED.TAKE LARGE RAG PLACE OVER COOLANT OVERFLOW JUG CAP SLOWLY OPEN RADIATOR CAP A LITTLE AT A TIME UNTIL PRESSURE RELEASE.REMOVE OVER FLOW JUG CAP.ADD MORE COOLANT UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL AT THE FUL COLD MARK ON THE OVERFLOW JUG.THEN SCREW CAP BACK ON THE OVERFLOW JUG.START ENGINE LET IT IDLE AGAIN WATCH ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE GAUGE WHEN TEMPERATURE GAUGE START CLIMBING.TURN OFF ENGINE WAIT A WHILE.CHECK COOLANT LEVEL IN THE OVER FLOW JUG.DO THIS PROCEDURE UNTIL THE COOLANT LEVEL IN THE COOLANT OVERFLOW JUG STOP DROPPING AND STAY AT FULL COLD MARK,WHEN THE TOP RADIATOR HOSE GET HOT THERMOSTAT OPENING AIR IS OUT THE COOLANT SYSTEM. WHEN ENGINE COOLS DOWN.CHECK COOLANT OVERFLOW JUG COOLANT MUST BE IN THE COOLANT OVER FLOW JUG AT THE FULL COLD MARK WHEN ENGINE COLD. DONT .DONT OVERFILL COOLANT OVERFLOW JUG.KEEP COOLANT IN THE OVERFLOW JUG IF YOU LET COOLANT OVERFLOW JUG RUN DRY AIR WILL BE DRAW IN COOLANT SYSTEM CAUSE ENGINE TO OVERHEAT.

Aug 12, 2011 | 1999 Oldsmobile Alero

3 Answers

I replaced my radiator on my 2004 with a 2.2 and it seems like the thermostat is not opening. It can not get the air out. It seem to just to over heat and push the coolant out. Randy


REPLACE THERMOSTAT IF TOP COOLANT COOLANT HOSE GOING TO RADIATOR IS HOT TO TOUCH THERMOSTAT OPEN. TO BLEED COOLANT SYSTEM FIRST YOU NEED TO ADD COOLANT TO THE COOLANT OVER FLOW JUG UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL STOP DROPPING AND STAY AT FULL COLD MARK.WAIT 3 MINUTES IF COOLANT DROPS ADD MORE COOLANT UNTIL COOLANT STAY AT FULL COLD MARK.WITH RADIATOR OVER CAP OFF CRANK ENGINE FOR MINUTE WATCH COOLANT LEVEL AT OVERFLOW JUG.IF COOLANT DROPS ADD MORE COOLANT IN THE OVERFLOW JUG.WHEN COOLANT LEVEL STOP DROPPING IN OVERFLOW JUG.SCREW BACK ON THE RADIATOR CAP TO OVERFLOW JUG.WHILE ENGINE IDLING WATCH TEMPERATURE GAUGE WHEN TEMPERATURE START CLIMBING TURN OFF ENGINE WAIT A WHILE KEEP FROM GETTING SCALDED.WHEN COOLANT COOL DOWN SOME. PLACE A LARGE RAG OVER THE COOLANT OVERFLOW JUG OPEN CAP LITTLE AT A TIME UNTIL PRESSURE RELEASED, THEN REMOVE CAP ADD MORE COOLANT IN THE OVERFLOW JUG TO THE FULL COLD MARK.THEN REPEAT THE PROCESS SCREW BACK ON THE COOLANT OVERFLOW RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP.THEN START ENGINE WATCH TEMPERATURE GAUGE WATCH COOLANT TEMPERATURE GAUGE WHEN COOLANT TEMPERATURE START RISING TURN OFF ENGINE AGAIN WAIT UNTIL ENGINE COOL DOWN ENOUGH TO KEEP FROM GETTING SCALDED TAKE PLACE LARGE RAG OVER RADIATOR CAP WHICH IS THE COOLANT OVERFLOW JUG CAP OPEN CAP LITTLE AT A TIME UNTIL PRESSURE RELEASED ADD COOLANT UNTIL AT FULL COLD MARK. WHEN YOUR COOLANT LEVEL STOP DROPPING.AND TOP RADIATOR HOSE VERY HOT THERMOSTAT OPEN AND AIR IS OUT THE COOLANT SYSTEM. MAKE SURE YOUR COOLANT OVERFLOW JUG HAS COOLANT IN IT,WHEN ENGINE COOL DOWN CHECK COOLANT OVERFLOW JUG KEEP COOLANT LEVEL AT FULL COLD MARK.BECAUSE IF OVERFLOW JUG IS EMPTY THATS A SIGN RADIATOR COOLANT LEVEL LOW.WHEN OVERFLOW JUG EMPTY IT WILL ALLOW AIR GET IN THE COOLANT SYSTEM AND CAUSE CAR TO OVERHEAT.WHEN REPLACING THERMOSTAT ALSO REPLACE THE RADIATOR CAP ON THE COOLANT OVERFLOW JUG.

Aug 09, 2011 | 2004 Oldsmobile Alero

2 Answers

Having issues with a 2000 chevy impala overheating have changed the radiator and the thermostat fans seem to be working ok but overheats at idle in stop and go traffic, after a certain amount of time it...


YOU NEED BLEED COOLANT SYSTEM.CHECK COOLANT LEVEL IN RADIATOR.ADD MORE DEXCOOL UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL IS CLOSE TO RADIATOR SPOUT.CRANK ENGINE LET IDLE UNTIL TOP RADIATOR HOSE GET HOT.WATCH TEMPERATURE GAUGE.IF TEMPERATURE GAUGE START RISING TO HOT ZONE.TURN OFF ENGINE.LET COOL DOWN.USE LARGE RAG SLOWLY OPEN RADIATOR CAP A LITTLE AT A TIME UNTIL ALL PRESSURE RELIEVED.REMOVE RADIATOR CAP.ADD MORE COOLANT.CRANK CAR AGAIN LET IDLE UNTIL TOP RADIATOR GET HOT.KEEP EYE ON TEMP.GAUGE ALSO.WHEN TEMP.GAUGE STOP CLIMBING.YOUR COOLANT SYSTEM BLED.WHEN DONE LET CAR SET A WHILE CHECK COOLANT LEVEL.ALSO FIRST THING IN THE MORNING CHECK COOLANT LEVEL AGAIN.AND BESURE ADD COOLANT IN THE OVERFLOW JUG TO THE COLD MARK.DONT OVER FILL THE COOLANT RESERVOIR JUG.WORK SAFELY DONT GET SCALDED.

Feb 15, 2011 | 2000 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

Temperature Gauge Always On Cold


As long as your gauge is still moving up, there's no real problem. You have heat coming from the heater. It's only a problem if it's getting too hot. What's going on is that you don't let the vehicle run long enough, and it's so cold outside that the engine stays cold. It raises in temp when your stopped because there's no airflow through the radiator. The thermostat just heats up the engine block, and won't change the reading on the gauge. When this goes bad your car will overheat in just a few miles.

Mar 04, 2009 | 1998 Subaru Legacy

1 Answer

Engine overheats when heater pipes connected


I think you could be right about there being air trapped in the system.
Or the heater core(radiator) is plugged.
Either way you need a pressurized radiator coolant pump to put the coolant in without air being trapped.
Although,i have seen it done by jacking the vehicle up high enough that the radiator was now higher than the heater core level, and then the coolant was put in.
But this is dangerous to try.

Jan 29, 2009 | 1999 Ford Escort

2 Answers

Heater temperature does not stay hot


1st thing to check is the coolant level. I've seen cars w/ no heat, or very little quite a few times caused by low level in cooling system--not low enough to overheat the engine, but enough that circulation of coolant to heater core is affected (no or little hot coolant circulation to heater core=no or little heat),
Is the engine temp gauge in the normal range? If it's in the low range, engine not reaching operating temp. it could be caused by a thermostat stuck in the open position (or no thermostat, sometimes people remove them when their car overheats, and this should not be done).
Here's how the system works: the heater 'box' contains a heater core (a mini radiator) w/ a fan and hoses connecting the heater core to the engine cooling system. Hot engine coolant is circulated thru the heater core. When u activate the heat switch on the dash, a flap door opens to expose the heater box to the passenger compartment. The fan switch on the dash activates the fan, which blows air thru the core, which heats the air.
So, if it's not the coolant level at the radiator, the fan is obviously working, the engine is reaching operating temperature, I would say it must be the flap door that opens, isn't opening fully, or isn't staying open. It could be the dash switch is defective (not supplying current to open flap door) or less likely the flap door is binding somehow. Hope it's as simple as correcting coolant level, if not, the dash switch control should be checked

Oct 22, 2008 | 2004 Dodge Caravan

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