Question about 2004 Toyota Sienna

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2005 sienna ce 2wd has terrible traction in snow/ice

Especially difficult to go up slippery New England hills
new tires did not solve problem
it does not have traction control
performs well otherwise

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  • Toyota Master
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Are the new tires rated for ice & snow? They are a softer compound & grip better in cold weather.

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

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Why is Hyundai Equus very difficult to control when driving on snow or ice?


loss of traction control--normal when the ice condition is encountered
change tires to snow tires or use chains

Aug 19, 2016 | Hyundai Cars & Trucks

Tip

Winter driving tips.


WINTER TIRES
As a mechanic and a shop owner I get to try out various types of vehicles during test drives. So we get to try out different types of tires too. We learn what works well and what doesn't.
Don't kid yourself, all season tires don't come close to a quality winter tire on ice and snow. And when you add studs to a winter tire it makes them incredibly good. I hope they allow studded tires where you drive.
All season tires work well when they can contact the road surface directly, but when isolated from the road by ice and snow they just don't work. The compound of the tire is generally harder to resist summer heat that wears tires out and with the colder temperatures they just get stiffer.
The winter tire compound is a little softer which allows a better contact patch with whatever is under it and the larger tread gaps pinch the snow to gain traction.
Another big misconception with tires is putting them on the drive wheels only.
OK, why not you ask? Well lets start with one of the most common vehicles on the road today, a family sedan, front wheel drive.
On these cars your engine and transmission is front mounted, so a good part of the weight is front biased. So that puts lots of weight on your front wheels. Weight =traction, right? So you put your winter tires on the front and your already used all seasons on the back.
Imagine now cruising down the freeway in 4 inches of fresh snow, "man these winter tires are awesome !" But you need to brake in a hurry for a deer coming out. Well those fresh winters do their job OK but the lightweight back end of your car hasn't the traction to handle the maneuver, the back end is sliding around sideways...hang on to it!!!
Well you get the picture now. You need all 4.

DONT SPIN YOUR TIRES

How many times do you see it each slippery day? You know, the drivers wheels howling for mercy as they attempt to accelerate.
Many vehicles today are equipped with traction control, there is a good reason for this accessory to your vehicle. If you can accelerate without spinning you will get moving faster than someone who is, and under more control too. A spinning tire will often create a hot spot under itself, melt the ice or snow and make it even more slippery. You even run the risk of getting yourself stuck in the rut you create.
A spinning tire also will go sideways easier, as it loses traction it also loses some direction.
Granpa said to me sometimes...slow down and go faster ...I now have seen the truth in it.

on Dec 05, 2009 | Chevrolet Impala Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

How can I get better traction in snow with my 2wd rear wheel drive pioneer it is terrible in snow.


ask diff reconditioners shop or off road shop if a limited slip diff center is available ( welding diff centers is not an option as it makes the car illegal on the road and dangerous to handle on a good road surface )

you need tall gears that do not loose traction because of the torque advantage from low ratios as in the switch on the dash. so don't use it in tow mode

as for tires there are special snow tires available with spikes in the tread , special tread patterns

( ask a tyre shop for what would be best)

extra weight over the rear end would help with traction

I would think that wide tires would tend to "aqua plane" as they rode up over the snow but talk with a tyre shop again on that

there may be a diff locker available from an off road shop

Consider changing the entire rear end to get the diff operation that would best suit you

Sep 08, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Are there damage to any 4wheel drive components shifting from 4wheeldrive setting still with transmission is indrive


Most 4WD systems are designed to be shifted in and out "on the fly". It is less stressful for the drive train doing it while in park however. 4WD does not like cornering - especially on "grippy" surfaces such as dry asphalt (why would you need 4WD on dry asphalt, anyway?). Dry asphalt is really tough on 4WD as the the tires may have minute differences in circumference as a result of wear and since all are spinning at the exact speed (even going straight ahead), those difference add up and strain the drive train. Slippery surfaces allow the tires to slip away those differences as soon as they begin to appear. Even wet pavement allows this to happen, tho not as easily as grass, dirt, snow or ice.

Drive in a tight, complete circle on dirt and you'll see that there's a shorter path of tracks for the inside tires than those on the outside. Yet, the 4WD locks all wheels to turn the same amount. The jerking during the cornering that you're feeling is the inside tires trying to spin to "catch up" to turning at the same rate as the outer tires. See the video linked below.

Check your manual and you'll likely be cautioned against running 4WD on dry pavement for these reasons.


Mar 03, 2015 | 2002 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

When do u use the traction control button on 2005 chevy equinox ?


Traction control is for safety. It reduces wheel spin. When it is turned on it is harder to lose control in slippery road conditions. Like doing donuts in the snow.

Feb 19, 2015 | 2005 Chevrolet Equinox

1 Answer

Problem with my traction on ice or men hole it does not respond


If chucks are tires, you can never expect very much traction on either ice or wet manholes. Though, some are better than others, usually those with adaquate ice traction are snow or winter tires. For driving in constant ice conditions, you will need studs. But, studs cannot be used on pavement, at all.

Jan 07, 2015 | Subaru Outback Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How is four wheel drive used on a 1999 durango


Hi Ralph.

I do not own a Durango, but have owned many 4WD vehicles and can offer tips for proper usage.

The "L" and "H" after the 4 and 2 stand for "Low" and "High" ranges. The 2 and 4 stand for the number of wheels that can receive power from the engine and transmission. Most 4WD vehicles only provide power to 1 wheel on each axle (front at rear for a total of just 2 wheels powered) at any given time (but for purposes of discussion, we'll call it 2WD & 4WD, as advertised).

Generally, "2WD" is only offered as a High range and is the same as a "normal" 2WD car or truck. I haven't seen a car or small truck that offers 2L (but I haven't seen a Durango - so I don't know), but generally 2WD traction can be increased easily enough by simply shifting the transmission to a lower gear (From "D" to "2" or "2" to "1", etc.).

4WD is designed to provide additional traction whenever 2WD isn't sufficient. This can be when surfaces are slippery such as sand, mud, snow and ice or, when pulling a heavy load such as a trailer and tires are not gripping the surface well. Shifting from 2WD to 4WD High will provide more traction at the same tire speed. Maximum power from the engine does not come at low RPMs, so in order to get more pulling power from the engine with out increasing speed (or spinning tires), the transmission should shifted into a lower gear. This is especially helpful when pulling a trailer up a wet incline, etc. If 4WD High in 1st gear is still allowing tires to spin or not providing enough pulling power, then shifting the transfer case from 4WD High to 4WD Low will allow the engine speed to increase (providing more power) without increasing the speed of the wheels (reducing the chances of spinning tires).

4WD should never be used while operating on dry pavement. Since tires wear at different rates, and turning left or right slows the inside tire and speeds up the outside tire when compared to the rear tires, a certain amount of slip is required. Wet surfaces provide this necessary amount of slip - as does sand, mud, snow, ice, dirt, gravel, etc. You should take the time to see how each selection of High and Low affects engine speed and vehicle speed and how the surface and any trailer further changes traction. With a little experimentation, you'll see how it works and be able to choose the right range with little thought.

Don't forget to have the transfer case & front differential fluids checked and changed as per the manual. Neglecting this simple service intervals can leave you stranded when you need 4WD and can be very expensive to repair.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Aug 24, 2012 | 1999 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

What is a tcm for a 1997 grand am?


The TCM is the traction control module.It prevents you from spinning your front tires when it is slippery out.Like in snow or ice conditions.Hope this helps.Good luck.

Jan 12, 2011 | 1997 Pontiac Grand Am

1 Answer

What is the T/C button on the dash?


Traction control controls spin in wheels on slippery roads. if you are stuck in snow or ice or on slippery road surface,try switching the traction control system off. this may allow excess wheel spin to dig the vehicle out.

Aug 16, 2010 | 2001 Mercury Sable

2 Answers

2WD OR 4WD? To buy or ot to buy!


On the plus side, 2wd gets better gas mileage, is cheaper to operate over time (no 4x4 transfer case or any 4x4 components to wear out or maintain). With a good set of snow tires and weight in the back, winter traction should be ok. The mileage 63k, is good too. If u live in southern New England, as I do, u can probably get by w/out 4x4.
On the negative side, If you have a job that requires u to be there no matter what the weather, and u live where there's a lot of snow, then maybe 4x4 is really necessary. How many days over the last few winters did you REALLY need 4x4? Around here, I'd say maybe 6 days a year. Do you really need it for 6 days?(or however many for your area). It is great to have when u need it, but u have to justify the extra expense for occasional need.
On a personal note, my 1st truck was 2wd, and I hauled a lot of stuff to the dump when I purchased a run down house. After loading up to overflowing, I got stuck in the yard, and had to unload everything to get out. I swore I'd never own a 2wd truck again. But gas was about 45 cents a gallon then, and now, 2 4x4's later, I avoid driving the truck due to gas prices, (I do plow snow, haul firewood, lumber, etc, buts after all this blah blah blah, I probably have u more confused than ever! GOOD LUCK, and let me know what u decide. countrycurt0

Sep 03, 2008 | 2000 Dodge Dakota Quad Cab

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