Question about 1999 GMC Sonoma

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Rear brakes Where do you releive the fluid pressure to remove the drums to replace the linings? I cannot find a bleeder valve, not can I find a slot to retract the old linings.

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Find it on the other wheel

Posted on Nov 25, 2008

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How do you fix sponge brakes on 2009 Hyundai Accent GLS 1.6 liter?


You've obviously still got air in the lines. If you can't remove it, take it to a shop for a pressure bleed.

Jul 08, 2017 | Hyundai Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

No brake pressure


When you bled the system was fluid coming out the bleeder valves?
Where the bleeder valves closed off with the brake pedal fully depressed?
Is the fluid reservoir cap ok?
Is the master cylinder ok?

Jan 05, 2014 | 1995 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

How do you bleed the brake system on 2003 suzki grand yitara 4x4 with abs brakes


The hydraulic brake system must be bled any time one of the brake lines is disconnected or air enters the system. There are two ways to bleed the system; pressure bleeding or manual bleeding. Both procedures will be given here, although pressure bleeding requires the use of some fairly expensive equipment (a pressure tank) and is seldom used. Both methods are equally effective.The correct bleeding sequence is: left front, right front, left rear, and right rear. On master cylinders equipped with a bleeder valve, bleed the master cylinder last.
PRESSURE BLEEDING
  1. Clean the top of the master cylinder, remove the cover, and attach the pressure bleeding adapter.
  2. The spring-loaded plunger on the front of the proportioning valve must be depressed while bleeding. Wire or tape can be wrapped around the valve to hold the plunger in.
  3. Check the pressure bleeder reservoir for correct pressure 20-29 psi (137-206 kPa) and fluid level, then open the release valve.
  4. Fasten a bleeder hose to the wheel cylinder or caliper bleeder nipple and submerge the free end of the hose in a transparent receptacle. The receptacle should contain enough brake fluid to cover the open end of the hose.
  5. Open the wheel cylinder or caliper bleeder nipple and allow the fluid to flow until all bubbles disappear and an uncontaminated flow exists.
  6. Close the nipple, remove the bleeder hose and repeat the procedure on the other wheel cylinders according to the sequence.


MANUAL BLEEDING(see Figures 1, 2 and 3)An alternative to the pressure method of bleeding requires two people to perform; one to depress the brake pedal and the other to open the bleeder nipples.
  1. Clean the top of the master cylinder, and then remove the cover and fill the reservoir with clean brake fluid.
  2. To prevent squirting fluid replace the cover.
  3. The spring-loaded plunger on the front of the proportioning valve must be depressed while bleeding. Wire or tape can be wrapped around the valve to hold the plunger in.
  4. Install a box end wrench on the left front bleeder screw.
  5. Attach a length of small diameter, clear vinyl tubing to the bleeder screw. Submerge the other end of the rubber tubing in a glass jar partially filled with clean brake fluid. Make sure the rubber tube fits on the bleeder screw snugly or you may be squirted with brake fluid when the bleeder screw is opened.
  6. Have your friend slowly depress the brake pedal. As this is done, open the bleeder screw half a turn and allow the fluid to run through the tube. Close the bleeder screw, then return the brake pedal to its fully released position.
  7. Repeat this procedure until no bubbles appear in the jar. Refill the master cylinder.
  8. Frequently check the master cylinder level during this procedure. If the reservoir runs dry, air will enter the system and the bleeding will have to be repeated.

Hope helps.

Sep 29, 2011 | 2000 Suzuki Grand Vitara

3 Answers

Busted wheel cyl on rear wheel lost fluid now no pressure back there what do i look for


if it is the wheel cylinder that is leaking then it will have to be replaced and all the components cleaned with brake cleaner.depending how badly soaked the brake shoes are you may have to replace them also.you may have to heat the brake line that connects to the wheel cylinder,or even replace the line if it gets damaged.the bleed all the air out of the system,

Mar 17, 2011 | 1997 Dodge Stratus

2 Answers

I have a1997 plymouth grand voyager and it has been leaking brake fluid that is showing on the back rim what is causing the leak is it the brake cylinder or the brake line


Hi, the problem is usually the brake wheel cylinder inside. Put the car in park but do not set the brake. Jack up the wheel and remove the wheel and drum. At the top of the hub assembly you will see a cylinder between the tops of the shoes with rubber boots on each side. If fluid leaks out when you pull back the edge of either boot, the cylinder is leaking and must be replaced.
Purchase a new cylinder and also some brake fluid if you don't have any on hand. Check your reservoir. Hopefully it is not empty, or you would have drawn air into the system. Fill up the reservoir before replacing the wheel cylinder.
To replace, use a vice grip plier to remove the return spring that holds the shoe tops together, then pull the shoe tops away from the cylinder. Place something under the hub to catch the fluid that will leak during the replacement.
Loosen the hydraulic fitting on the back of the hub using a line wrench of the correct size, then remove the 2 bolts holding the cylinder to the hub (see picture below). Have the new cylinder handy and disconnect the line from the old cylinder. Quickly remove the old cylinder and put in the new one. Screw the line fitting on finger tight and then replace the bolts. Replace the return spring between the shoes. Tighten the line and open the bleeder valve above the fitting about one turn. The line may gravity bleed the air out. Give it a few minutes. If clear fluid starts to leak out and no bubbles, tighten the bleeder and reassemble the wheel. If it does not gravity bleed, replace the drum and have someone assist with a pressure bleed. With the bleeder closed, have the assistant pump the brake pedal and then hold it down while you open and close the bleeder. They should not let up on the pedal until you have closed the bleeder. repeat this process of ejecting air and fluid until only fluid comes out. Then replace the wheel and let the car down.
Please let me know if you have any questions, and thanks for using FixYa.

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Jan 15, 2011 | 1997 Plymouth Voyager

1 Answer

How to bleed brakes on a 1992 Chevy Caprice. Specifically the rear drums


start from the fartherest place from brake master cylinder, that will be the rear passenger side wheel. it takes two people to bleed brakes. you will find the bleeder valve screws at the top of inside of the rear drums on both rear wheels, have someone pump the brakes up, will take at least 4 pumps of brake pedal, at 4th pump keep pressure on pedal while you break loose the bleeder valve on the rear wheel, fluid will come out and brake pedal will go down to floor, keep pressure on brake pedal until you've tightened the bleeder screw back [note] you'll only have to back the bleeder valve out about a half turn until you see the fluid come out. after you've done the rear brakes add brake fluid to the master cylinder as it will be low. then go to the front passeger side and you will find the bleeder screw on the brake caliper. repeat the same proceedure as back. remember that pressure on the pedal is a must until you've tightened those bleeder valve screws back or else it will **** air into the brake system. suggest that you bleed all 4 wheels not just the back. after you've bled the front make sure you add more brake fluid back to the master cylinder, it will be low again. hope this helps and thank you for choosing fixya.com

Nov 21, 2010 | 1992 Chevrolet Caprice

1 Answer

Changed the rear end of 1989 Suburban (4 wheel drive). Put on new brake lines for the rear brakes. The brake pedal is hard. There is no brake fluid going to the rear brakes and the front brakes seem to...


It has to be your proportioning valve, and it is probably jammed and blocking flow to the rear. You can either replace the valve or try to reset it. To reset, you need a way to put pressure into the rear brake exit port. If the valve has bleeder screws on it, try opening the front bleeder and pumping the pedal. If there is no bleeder on the valve, I have also heard of people opening the front caliper bleeders and pumping the brake to see if a little pressure in the rear will slide the piston open. No harm in trying these ideas before buying a new one, eh.

Oct 26, 2010 | 1989 Chevrolet Suburban

1 Answer

How do you adjust the rear brakes on a 2003 kia spectra? It feels like you have to push the break pedals down to the floor in order for the car to stop. They seem to need tightening, but there doesn't seem...


The rear brakes on the Spectra will always engage less than the front brakes. If you have to push hard on the brake pedal then you probably have air in the brake lines from the last brake pad replacement. The brakes need to be bled with this method: Use 1/8 inch 2 foot long hose from parts store and attach from bleeder valve ball on the brake caliper to a bottle partially filled with brake fluid. End of hose should be submerged in bottle. With second person holding brake pedal to floor, slowly turn bleeder valve counter clockwise (loosen tiny bit) with wrench and watch for dirty brake fluid to create bubbles in the bottle. When bubbles start, quickly tighten bleeder valve back to tight. Second person lifts foot while valve is tight and then pushes pedal to floor again and THEN you again open bleeder valve slowly turning counter clockwise and watch for bubbles. Repeat until no more bubbles can be created in the bottle where the hose is submerged. Move to next caliper and repeat. For a firm brake pedal you will need to repeat this on all four calipers. My 2003 Kia's rear brake pads "fell apart" and never wore out in 190000 miles because they do not get used. The braking power is primarily in the front disk brakes on this model. Removing and replacing the rear drum brake linings did not even require me to bleed the brake lines. They weren't that tight before or after the replacement procedure.

Jul 24, 2010 | 2003 Kia Spectra

1 Answer

Where is the bleeder valve on the rear of 87 Cadillac Deville


If you are referring to the brake bleeder valve, it is located on the wheel cylinders on the backing plate of the brakes for the drum brakes. Follow the brake lines to this bleeder valve. However, it might be rusty and must be soaked in penetrating oil or brake fluid before trying to turn it.

If you are referring to the air ride suspension, look at the rear axle area and look for a lever that controls the 'air bleed' for the air shocks. Follow the small (in diameter) plastic air lines from either of the rear shocks to the bleeder valve.

Jun 15, 2010 | 1987 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

I have a Jeep Wrangler 1992. Replaced rear axle with a Ford 8.8 axel rear end and installed all new brake rotors, callipers, hoses, metal lines, forward brake discs, hoses. Have bled reapeatedly....pumping...


The proportioning valve most definately can be the problem. Did you change it or is it the original? (A disc/drum system uses a 70%front/30%rear braking ratio, whereas an all-disc system is alot more even). I would first bleed the master cylinder. Then I would 'gravity bleed' the rest of the system by opening the bleeders on all 4 wheels. Do not at any point let the m/cylinder go dry. Also, do not touch the brake pedal.
Continuously check all 4 bleeders, when clean brake fluid with no bubbles at all is running from a bleeder, close it. When all 4 wheels are done, recheck the fluid level and you should be OK.
Pump the pedal to 'self-adjust' the rear calipers, then re-check the fluid level.
Any problem after that means you either have a loose connection (it's possible for a tiny leak to let air in, but not let fluid leak), a leak, or you need a new (disc/disc type) proportioning valve. I would try Summit Racing myself. Good Luck!

Dec 26, 2008 | 1992 Jeep Wrangler

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