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IGNITION COIL OVERHEATING

RENAULT 5TL 1,1L '91, mechanical ignition system, coil is overheating after some time and engine jerks. If engine is stopped, during 20 minutes it's not possible to start. Cold engine starts perfectly.
Coil, breaker,leads, spark plugs and condenser are new and checked. Wiring seems OK (fuses do not burn).
Possible causes of this problem?

Thanks in advance

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6 Suggested Answers

m-sykes
  • 71 Answers

SOURCE: jeep overheating

your head gasket is gone....this will require a new gasket and the head to be skimmed.....dont be wasting money on anthin else

Posted on Aug 28, 2008

alicantecoli
  • 21949 Answers

SOURCE: renault megane classic 11 engine vibrates with loss of power when started

famous froggy electrics again ,renault garage to get ECU sorted ,buy a new car its cheaper than paying garage

Posted on Nov 15, 2008

alicantecoli
  • 21949 Answers

SOURCE: renault scienic trottle sticking

check valve timing ?? someone changed cam belt??

Posted on Dec 20, 2008

morse008
  • 1111 Answers

SOURCE: twingo 1999 would mot start

you may have a break in the power lead to the coil or have you checked to ensure the wire has not grounded out to the body possibly from rubbing against the frame also look for fusible links as well as ensuring the wires were put in the correct sequence as prior removal ,are the Plug wires cracked if you bend them do you see cracks in them ..if so the issue may reside with them try spraying with a spray bottle the wires as someone else turns the car over do you see any arching then this would be your issue too start with

Posted on Sep 10, 2009

jeffbvegas1
  • 520 Answers

SOURCE: jerking and losing power

Probably bad ignition system which can be anything from a failing coil pack,ignition wires or cracked spark plugs. Look closely for signs of missing by looking for cracks in plugs,bad plug wires or a white/green crusty chalk build up on the coil

Posted on Sep 13, 2009

SQUIRESXX
  • 486 Answers

SOURCE: Renault 9 auto, fitted new coil and knock senser

what year ??? & engine

Posted on Jan 03, 2010

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1 Answer

Ignition coil is overheating what


no car stated
no year ,no model , no engine stated.
no answers. see?
does engine run?
if car is EFI, the coil is bad,or the ignitor shorted,
EFI means Electronic Fuel injected.
if no EFI or some old carb car real old?
  1. (to long points dwell time)
  2. wrong coil,
  3. bad coil
  4. coil start up resistor was by passed by someone. causing overheat.
on new cars, the dwell is fixed by the ECU/PCM
so cant be wrong. leaving bad coil bad ignitor.

Feb 13, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Pls help me figure out what this code is so I can fix my car pls. p1305


- Ignition Coil No. 2 harness is open or shorted
- Ignition Coil No. 2 circuit poor electrical connection
- Faulty Ignition Coil No. 2
- Faulty Engine Control Module (ECM)

the likelyhood is that your coil pack has started to break or is leaking in damp
spray it with wd40

Dec 08, 2014 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Why is my 2.0 S 2001 golf when travelling around town or on highway the car hunts and jerks. When going on long trips and stop to refuel it wont start until it cools it wont start ?


run fault codes and look for problem in the ignition coil/s or ECM . This is a problem related to an overheating piece of electronic equipment like a coil, injector control , position sensor

Aug 12, 2014 | 2001 Volkswagen Golf 2.0

1 Answer

Ignition coil wiring diagram


I would probably go ahead and replace the components, at least with used parts as a trial.
Do you have the Delco system or the Magnavox system ? The Delco system has 3 small coils.

May 15, 2013 | Pontiac Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Cranks but won't start



Trouble Code: P0300

Multiple Cylinder Misfire Detected
Possible Causes:


Air leak in the intake manifold, or in the EGR or EVAP system Base engine mechanical fault that affects two or more cylinders Erratic or interrupted CKP or CMP Sensor signals Fuel delivery component fault that affects two or more cylinders (i.e., a contaminated, dirty or sticking fuel injector)


Trouble Code: P0302

Cylinder 1-10 Misfire Detected
Possible Causes:


Air leak in the intake manifold, or in the EGR or EVAP system Base engine mechanical fault that affects only one cylinder Fuel delivery component fault that affects only one cylinder (e.g., a dirty fuel injector)


Trouble Code: P0305

Cylinder 1-10 Misfire Detected
Possible Causes:


Air leak in the intake manifold, or in the EGR or EVAP system Base engine mechanical fault that affects only one cylinder Fuel delivery component fault that affects only one cylinder (e.g., a dirty fuel injector)


Trouble Code: P0351

Ignition Coil No. 1, 2 or 3 Primary Circuit
Possible Causes:


ASD relay power circuit to the ignition coil is open Ignition Coil No. 1, 2 or 3 primary "driver" circuit open or grounded Ignition Coil No. 1, 2 or 3 is damaged or it has failed


Trouble Code: P0352

Ignition Coil No. 1-8 Primary Circuit
Possible Causes:


ASD relay power circuit to the ignition coil is open Ignition coil primary "driver" circuit open or grounded


Trouble Code: P0353

Ignition Coil No. 1-8 Primary Circuit
Possible Causes:


ASD relay power circuit to the ignition coil is open Ignition coil primary "driver" circuit open or grounded Ignition coil is damaged or it has failed PCM has failed Ignition coil is damaged or it has failed PCM has failedPCM has failed Ignition system problem (coil or plug) in only one cylinder Ignition system problem (coil or plug) in only one cylinder Ignition system problem (coil or plug) in two or more cylinders Vehicle driven with low fuel pressure or while very low on fuel

Jun 06, 2012 | 2001 Jeep Wrangler

2 Answers

Enging code came up on my 2004 dodge ram 1500 5.7 Hemi. Said ignition coil E was bad and that I had a misfire in cylinder 3. Replaced coil at cylinder 3 but it's still running rough. Is coil E somewhere...


Have you checked the spark plug itself? --- 5.7L Engine To Remove:
NOTE: Note spark plug cable original positions before removing.
dod_ram15_57_ign_coil.gif

dod_ram15_57_ign_coil_loc.gif

  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions at the beginning of this section.
  2. Clean the area around the coil with compressed air.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Battery negative cable
    • Throttle body air intake tube and intake box (if necessary)
    • Coil electrical connector by moving slide lock and pressing on release lock
    • Secondary high-voltage cable from coil
    • Mounting bolts
    • Coil from cylinder head opening by twisting
To Install:
  1. Clean area around spark plugs with compressed air.
  2. Apply dielectric grease to inside of boots.
  3. Install or connect the following:
    • Ignition coil to cylinder head opening
    • 2 mounting bolts
      1. Torque to: 106 inch lbs. (12 Nm)
    • Coil electrical connector
    • Cable to coil
    • Throttle body air tube and intake box (if necessary)
    • Battery negative cable
---
Distributorless Ignition System General Information This vehicle uses two different types of ignition systems. The 3.7L, 4.7L, and 5.7L engines do not use a conventional distributor. The 5.9L engine uses a conventional distributor. The ignition system is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) on all engines. Procedures in this section are for the 3.7L, 4.7L, and 5.7L engines; please see the section on Distributor Ignition Systems for procedures for the 5.9L engine.
Distributorless ignition systems (EI) are used on many current engines. This system uses the waste spark method for distributing secondary voltage. In a waste spark system, an individual coil is used to fire one pair of engine cylinders simultaneously. These cylinders are known as companions, since each of their pistons is at TDC at the same time. On a typical V6 engine for example, cylinder 1 is at TDC compression while cylinder 4 is at TDC exhaust. This is also true of cylinders 2 and 5 as well as cylinder 3 and 6.
The cylinder on the compression stroke is known as the event cylinder, while the cylinder on the exhaust stroke is called the waste cylinder. Since secondary resistance is very low in the cylinder on the exhaust stroke, little voltage is required to fire the plug. For this reason, the majority of available voltage is consumed by the cylinder on the compression stroke.
One spark plug is attached to each end of the secondary coil winding via the spark plug wires. This series circuit arrangement causes one of the plugs to fire in a forward direction (center electrode to outer electrode), and the other spark plug to fire in a reverse direction (outer electrode to center electrode). The firing voltage requirements on the waste spark ignition are significantly greater than a traditional ignition system primarily because it takes 30% more energy to fire a plug reverse polarity. When a spark plug is fired backwards, it fires from the outer electrode to the center electrode. This is a high resistance path since the electrons do not flow as easily from a cold, dull surface such as the outer electrode to a hot, sharp surface like the center electrode.
Since the coil and plugs are arranged in a series circuit, a typical plug gap of .050" results in a total gap of .100" for the whole circuit that includes two spark plugs for the companion cylinders. The waste spark can overcome this added resistance by producing high secondary output voltages due to low resistance in the primary winding. Another reason higher secondary ignition voltage is required is cylinder pressure; specifically, the lack of it. Generally, event cylinders require 10 to 12-kV to initiate current flow across the spark plug gap, while only 2 - 3-kV is needed to fire the waste cylinder. Therefore, the air gap in the waste cylinder creates no more resistance than the rotor gap does in a conventional ignition system.
There are two different methods used for coil trigger. One method sends the crankshaft sensor signal directly to the ignition module to activate the coils, while the other sends the crankshaft sensor signal to the PCM and the PCM controls ignition operation either directly or through a separate ignition module.
Waste spark ignition advantages
  • It has fewer components than conventional distributor-type ignition systems.
  • No mechanical adjustments to set ignition timing.
  • No mechanical load (turning the distributor shaft).
  • No unwanted timing variations caused by gear lash or other worn distributor components.
Another advantage of waste spark is longer coil life. To illustrate this point, consider a six-cylinder engine with conventional ignition. At 3000 RPM, the coil must fire 9000 times per minute. This is calculated by dividing the engine speed by 2, since the cam turns at half crank speed, and then multiplying the distributor RPM by the total number of engine cylinders.
In contrast, the coils on a six-cylinder engine with waste spark only work a third as hard. This is because there's a coil for every two cylinders and each coil fires every crankshaft revolution. This means that at 3000 RPM, the coils only fire 3000 times per minute. This allows each coil to operate with less dwell (time that the coil is energized), resulting in less heat buildup and longer life.
Coil Over Plug System The coil over plug system was developed so that spark and spark timing could be better controlled on an individual cylinder basis. Each cylinder has an ignition coil mounted directly above the spark plug on the cylinder head cover. A short suppresser/connector replaces the spark plug wire and links the coil to the plug. There are different methods used for primary triggering. Some manufacturers use a combination coil/module, which means each coil has its own control circuit that is activated by the PCM. Others use remote mounted modules to trigger the coils.
Each individual coil is allowed to saturate while all other cylinders fire. For a V-8 engine, this allows a period of seven firing events for coil saturation, compared to three events for the same V-8 engine with a waste spark system. The coil over plug system also benefits from a minimum amount of energy lost, due to the resistance of spark plug wires.
Coil Near Plug System The coil near plug system also features multiple ignition coils. An ignition coil/module is mounted in proximity of each cylinder. There is a short length of spark plug wire between the coil and the spark plug.
Each ignition coil/module has its own control circuit and is activated sequentially by the PCM. All timing decisions are made by the PCM. This includes both ignition timing and duration of the spark.

Nov 03, 2010 | 2004 Dodge Ram 1500

1 Answer

While the engine quit and afer sittin for a short time started and went about 1 mile and engin died again. It wasn't overheating


without further diagnosis and proper testing equipment it sounds like you have a bad ignition coil or possibly a bad fuel pump. remove the fuel filler cap when this happens and listen for the fuel pump to come on when you turn the key to the run position. the fuel pump should run for 3-5 seconds. if it does the ignition coil is probably bad as the windings inside the coil can seperate when hot and reconnect when they cool again. good luck

Sep 23, 2010 | 1994 Ford Econoline

1 Answer

Ignition coil is overheating what is the cause of this?


Overheating ignition coils can be due to a number of causes. The symptoms are always the same though: poor or non-existent hot engine starting and rough running and misfiring whilst running.

The first is simply due to age: if it's traditional "wet" coil filled with transformer oil, then the oil can either leak out or simply break down with age. If so, the fix is simply to replace it and there are often modern compatible dry resin coils which do away with the oil filling completely. Dry resin coils can also fail with age or hard use, but it's far less common than with wet coils. A failing coil which usually works perfectly well be over-stressed if the vehicle is left idling for long periods on a hot day, such as during summer traffic jams. In such conditions, the coil will usually recover if the engine is turned off allowing the coil to cool down, but the damage caused by overheating is cumulative and the coil will become increasingly prone to overheating.

The second most common cause is a poorly tuned engine (if the vehicle is equipped with a distributor). If the ignition timing is incorrect or if the points gap has lessened due to wear then the coil can be energised for too long and will overheat. Note that the points gap and distributor timing are related: if the points are replaced or re-gapped, then the timing MUST be checked and reset both statically (engine not running, turned over by hand) and dynamically (engine running). Incorrect timing can also be down to a faulty or non-functional ignition advance and ****** mechanism. If you do not have ignition contact points, then there may be a fault with the electronic ignition module within the distributor.

If the vehicle has completely electronic ignition with no distributor then it's possible for faulty components to cause overheating coil. Most incorporate a variable dwell feature which prevents the coil from overheating when the engine is idling for extended periods. But I suspect this does not apply to your vehicle as you refer to a singular coil rather than the multiple (dry resin) coil packs mounted directly atop the spark plugs as per modern fully electronic ignitions. In any case, diagnosis of a fault with this set up requires electronic diagnostic tools.

I hope that my reply has been of assistance to you; if so please take a moment to rate my answer. If there's anything I've written which is unclear then please add a comment asking me for further clarification.

May 04, 2010 | 1998 Mitsubishi Eclipse

1 Answer

Jerking and losing power


Probably bad ignition system which can be anything from a failing coil pack,ignition wires or cracked spark plugs. Look closely for signs of missing by looking for cracks in plugs,bad plug wires or a white/green crusty chalk build up on the coil

Sep 13, 2009 | 1999 Saturn SL

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