Question about 2006 Volvo V50

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V50 hid kit flickers and turns off

When ignition is on but engine is not running the xenon lights work fine .When i start the engine they are on for a second or two then start flickering and just turn off with a low beam fault alarm in the car . Any ideas . or fixes

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  • gerluisan Dec 09, 2008

    Have a similar problem with the same car. I usually leave my light switch on the on position all the time. So when I start my car(with the lights on)the hids come on but one of them suddenly turns off after like two seconds. And if a turn the car on without the light switch on and then turn the lights on both lights flash for two seconds and then turn off. Anyone knows why this might be?

  • Anonymous Mar 16, 2009

    Yeah I just installed a new HID lamp kit on my Caliber... seems to work fine with lights on and car off... but as soon as I start the car I get flickering and they turn off and on. Maybe because the balast isn't grounded? it was supposed to just plug into the stock plug and there was no ground

    Mike

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Well, I don't have a specific solution to your problems but I found a troubleshooting guide on ebay that might help...hope it helps...
Click Here

Posted on Aug 29, 2009

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2 Answers

How do I get the low beams to run automatically whenever driving instead of flickering?




if you did it yourself and did not use factory lights or ballast then it could be a voltage detection problem. If you did use factory parts then the headlight switch may have failed by coincidence. also check connections at HL plugs and or switch. ???????????

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Fitting aftermarket HID (xenon) headlights to any brand of car


HID headlights are one of the best modifications you can make to a car. When they first came out, they were very expensive, but now the costs are extremely reasonable ($60-80 including shipping from a variety of sources online, somewhat higher if your car has one bulb that gives both low and high beams). The light output is about 3 1/2 times the intensity of halogen headlights, the bulbs have a lifespan to rival the car itself, and yet they draw less power than a standard halogen bulb (35w vs the 55w of a typical halogen bulb).

First off, how does it work? The system includes a pair of bulbs and a pair of power ballasts to drive them. Unlike a halogen bulb, which is a glass globe with a physical filament in it (which heats up to glowing when current passes through), an HID bulb has no filament. It functions much the same as an arc welder. At either end of a glass tube with a globe in the center, is an electrode. The center globe is filled with a combination of elements, among which is xenon gas. The power ballast is basically a transformer, which takes the 12 volt input from your car and boosts it tremendously. Xenon gas lights need an initial surge of over 22,000 volts to ignite, and a steady 75-85 volts to stay lit. The transformer in the power ballast steps up your 12 volt car voltage to these levels to drive the lights. However, the current is very, very low, and the result is a power draw of only 35 watts, a lot lower than the power draw of halogen lights. When the ballast fires that initial starting voltage, the electricity arcs between the electrodes in the bulb, through the xenon globe, molecularly exciting the xenon gas and causing it to emit light.

Some cars require an additional relay harness that connects directly to the battery to turn the lights on, but most do not. Your vendor should be able to tell you if your car will need this additional harness.

There are a few things to know before you order. First, you need to know what type of bulb your car has. Remove a headlight bulb and look for the number stamped on the base of the bulb. Many Japanese and GM cars use 9006-style bulbs for low beams. German cars like Audi and VW often use an H7 bulb. You'll need to know this for your car, so you can order your HID bulbs properly.

Next, you'll need the color temperature. The temperature, or "warmth", of the light is described in degrees Kelvin. Any manufacturer that offers HID lights as standard or optional equipment, puts out kits with a color temperature of 4300K (4300 degrees Kelvin). Again, this is a measurement of color, NOT of physical temperature. They offer 4300K bulbs because natural sunlight/daylight is very close to that color, and from behind the wheel, the combination of light color and light intensity rivals that of daylight. It's also a color that is easy on the eyes, and long night drives are more relaxing than with the yellowed halogen light - I've found that I feel less fatigued with HID lights than with halogens.

With color temperature, the higher the number, the more blue the light gets. The lower the number, the more it trends to yellow (a 3000K HID kit in your foglights would be a blazing yellow/amber color, great for cutting through rain, driving snow, or fog). 4300K light is very crystalline white on the road. Moving upward through 5000K and 6000K kits, you'll get a richer white with tinges of blue. I have had 4300K and 5000K in past cars, and currently have 6000K HIDs in my Audi. I like the 6000K best, but that's personal preference, although it does seem to have the fullest light.

Going beyond 6000K, you start getting into a seriously blue spectrum, and this is not recommended - sure it looks cool, but blue is one of the worst colors for visual definition, and does not penetrate distance nearly as well as the whiter colors of the spectrum. Going to 10,000K and above makes the light almost purple - again, cool for looks, but lousy for driving.

That's about all there is to know, other than the fact that HIDs will give your car a great look, and will blow you away with the visibility improvement. I've been modifying cars for a long time, and consistently, HIDs have been one of the best functional and aesthetic improvements I've made to any of them. And if your eyesight is somewhat compromised, or you drive a lot of unlit back roads, they're going to seem like an answer from heaven for your driving:)

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1 Answer

Hid drl's not working


DRLs generally run at lower power than regular lights by cycling on and off rapidly. DRL's are probably not compatible with your HID kit. Pull the DRL fuse, they are not required by law in the US,

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Headlights wont turn off automatically


I think you can try a hid light, because of xenon lamp no filament, so won't produce for filament broken and discard of the problem, the service life is much longer than halogen lamps, hid xenon lamp life is equivalent to the average car use cycle of the whole running time.
http://www.chinasinoy.com/wholesale/auto-hid-xenon-light/

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First let me just explain something about putting HID bulbs in a reflector headlight, then I'll get to answering your question. High end cars use something called a projector with their HID bulbs and these projectors focus the light into patterns that won't blind other drivers with very perfect cutoffs (no light goes above a certain line). To retrofit a projector into your stock housing it takes a lot of work and careful measurements and thus a lot of time. But this is the only way to do a HID retrofit the right way.
Putting a HID kit into a reflector housing as you did, also makes light scatter everywhere, which creates many hotspots or high concentrations of light that make it much more difficult to see the road. Not only do HID kits in relfector housings make it more difficult to see, they are hugely illegal, and can/may get you pulled over and ticketed by a police officer. 
The best thing you could do insted of putting a HID kit in your relfector housing is to get higher wattage bulbs, OSRAM makes some great H4 overwattage bulbs. http://www.rallylights.com/SearchResult.aspx?CategoryID=6
If you purchase from rally lights (you need to purchase them in sets of two( I wouldn't go over 85/80 watt bulbs because it could melt your housing.)
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