Question about 1996 Dodge Ram

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Choke sticks in winter

Is there an adjustment on throttle body flap? It stcks closed and stalls until it warms up.Thanks, Jon

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Clean the throttle body and flap. with the a tooth brush and throttle body cleaner from the parts store.this should fix the sticking im not sure about your stalling problem. also after you clean the throttle body and flap. it will be hard to start at first until all the cleaner burns out of the engine. its normal and will clear up in a minute or so. make sure you clean both sides of the flap. by holding the throttle open while brushing and spraying into throttle body. good luck.

Posted on Nov 23, 2008

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How to adjust automatic choke


Procedure #1-
  1. Be sure the hook on the bimetallic spring contacts the choke shaft lever.
  2. Install the cover and retainer and lightly tighten the screws.
  3. Turn the ceramic element to align the mark on it with the middle mark on the housing.
~~~ Procedure #2-
  1. The engine must be cold to make this adjustment.
  2. Remove the air cleaner.
  3. Find the automatic choke. It's the round thing on the upper right-hand of the carburetor. There is a wire coming to it from the positive side of the coil.
  4. Note: The automatic choke is a round ceramic thing with the heating element wound inside of it. (The ceramic part may be covered with metal so that it looks just like the rest of the carburetor.) The choke is held in position by a triangular ring clamp and three screws so it can be loosened and rotated for adjustment.
  5. Pull the throttle arm on the left side of the carburetor down to free the little step arm (cam) that the screw at the top of the throttle lever rests on.
  6. Note: This stepped "cam" is connected to the butterfly valve inside the throat of the carburetor by a shaft that extends all the way into the automatic choke. With the engine cold, the butterfly valve should be closed. As the engine warms up, the coil inside the automatic choke uncoils, opens the butterfly valve, and moves the cam to reduce the idle speed.
  7. Release the throttle arm so that the return spring snaps it back. The little screw at the top of the throttle arm (again, with the engine cold) should now rest on the top step of the stepped cam. This sets the hi-idle, which is needed together with the choke on a cold engine to provide sufficient idle speed to keep the engine running until it warms up fully.
  8. Loosen the three screws on the right side that hold the choke in place.
  9. Keep your eye on the butterfly valve in the carburetor throat.
  10. Turn the choke element clockwise (viewed from the right) until the butterfly is standing straight up, then turn the choke counterclockwise (viewed from the right) until the choke butterfly fully closes (barely -- not too tightly), then tighten the three screws that hold the choke in place.
  11. Note: This is important; the automatic choke may be assembled wrong and not catching the hook on the coil spring at all.
  12. Start the engine with the air cleaner off. As the engine warms up, make sure that the butterfly opens until it is standing straight up (full open) when the engine is fully warm. If it doesn't, readjust the choke until you get it right.
  13. Note: The engine is now warm, so you won't be able to adjust the choke per the foregoing. Note the position of the notch on the side of the choke relative to the three little ridges on the body of the carburetor. If the butterfly is too far closed with the engine warm, turn the choke clockwise just a bit to straighten it up. The notch on the choke should never be too far outside of the three ridges on the body of the carburetor. If you are not able to adjust the choke using these method, something may be sticking, or perhaps the coil spring inside the canister is broken, or perhaps the wire has fallen off of the contact on the canister so that it is not getting power from the battery properly.

Jul 15, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Carbeurator problems


Cold starting problems from a carbureted engine? Bet if you get your choke adjusted right, it will solve it. If you can screech the tires, this Tercel may be worth saving!
Just get a mechanic friend or pay someone to fix the choke. Doesn't take a long time if you know how. If you've never adjusted or worked on one, it's not so fun. Hard to explain too. The choke plate or flap should be almost closed completely when starting. Soon as engine is cranked or running, the plate should open a small amount more, but still nearly closed. Then as engine warms, the plate should gradually open until it is completely open after about 5-10 minutes. The choke cuts off the air supply to the engine. A cold engine needs a richer gas mixture to run good, and most importantly to start easy.

Nov 07, 2013 | 1988 Toyota Tercel 2 Door

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My 1983 toyota pickup carburetor flap wont close and it is letting in more air then fuel, so it dies when ideling. how can i fix this?


After 20 years on the road, the carb need to be taken apart and cleaned. It's a work for a mechanic.

Oct 23, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

My 1968 mustang wont idle when I lift my foot off the pedal. But it will idle when I step on to the pedal. What do I do?


If you look at the throttle linkage on the driver's side of the carb you will see that it should rest on a screw at idle. Turn that screw in a little should solve your problem.
If that doesn't fix it then you will have to adjust the mixture screws in front.

Aug 14, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

95yj 2.5 new IAC newTPS new TBI gasket still have ahigh idle speed 3500rpm .what to do


1- see that the throttle body flap is closed at idle, ie properly adjusted. if someone played with the adjustment then the iac will close to compensate but it won't be enough. proper adjustment for the flap is to turn the screw back until it disconnects from the flap and then turn it in 1/2 turn after it contacts the flap again.
2- pinch the vacuum booster hose while it is running; you may have a torn booster membrane.
3- stuck pcv valve- pinch off it as well and see if normal idle returns.
4- the iac is not being controlled by the computer; maybe a harness or computer problem.
expose the throttle body and with your finger close off the iac intake port; if the idle falls drastically or the vehicle stalls, then you can be sure that the problem is with the iac or its control.

Mar 21, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 1997 Nissan Sentra when at idle (like at stop sign) acts like its choking and if I don't give it gas it dies


I post this recommendation often as most people do not know about it. Your throttle body is gunked up to kingdom come with engine grime and is sticking not allowing the proper amount of air to get into your engine.

Your specific scenario sounds like the engine computer is not able to adequately adjust air coming into the engine and if you do not rev the engine, forcing the throttle body open the engine will choke out literally and die.

CLEAN the throttle body. there is a metal flap inside that is getting stuck. Check here to see a clean throttle body

Here is the quick and dirty: Your gas pedal is hooked up to a wire or motor that turns a flap open and closed and various degrees of open and closed as you apply and take pressure off of the pedal. this flapper gets gunked up and sticks. it is the sticking that causes your car to choke and die :)

Go buy CRC Throttle Body Cleaner and remove the throttle body and spray that in there and wipe clean with a towel.

Search forums for vehicle specific instructions on how to remove the throttle body and clean it. Guaranteed you are not the only person with this issue.

I will try and help for your Nissan Sentra


1. Open the hood, look at then engine.
2. On the right side there will be an air intake tube that is black and hooked up to your air box and throttle body with hose clamps
3. Losen the hose clamp from the throttle body and remove the black air hose from it and gently move it out of the way.
--> If you do not want to remove the throttle body completely, skip to step #7
4. there will be 4 bolts holding the throttle body to the intake manifold.
5. Note any and all electrical connections to the throttle body.
6. Remove the electrical connections (unplug) and remove the bolts (4) and the throttle body should come off.
7. Spray CRC Throttle Body Cleaner all over and wipe clean with a cloth that can get really dirty.
8. Make it SHINE :) then reinstall
9. put 4 bolts back on, reconnect the electrical connections you remembered from step #5
10. Reconnect the black air hose and tighten the hose clamp...

Done!

Start the car and it should be good as new. (sort of)

-Brian

May 25, 2011 | Nissan Sentra Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Car starts sometimes and when u give it gas it wants to die or u try to drive it it wont go


CLEAN the throttle body. the flap is getting stuck. google search how to clean the throttle body on your car.

Here is the quick and dirty: Your gas pedal is hooked up to a wire or motor that turns a flap open and closed and various degrees of open and closed as you apply and take pressure off of the pedal. this flapper gets gunked up and sticks. it is the sticking that causes your car to choke and die :)

Go buy CRC Throttle Body Cleaner and remove the throttle body and spray that in there and wipe clean with a towel.

Search forums for vehicle specific instructions on how to remove the throttle body and clean it. Guaranteed you are not the only person with this issue.

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1 Answer

1984 passat cl. the automatic choke runs too fast


the choke has 3 screws to adjust the unit,the choke itself will normaly be siezed inside at the age.With a warm engine, loosen the 3 screws and turn the choke untill the idle drops.

or as i did it-with a cold engine, remove the airffilter and with the 3 screws loose on the choke press the accelerator pedal just over half so the choke is engaged and the looking inside the filter housing adjust the choke flap by turning the choke housing until the flap is 3/4 closed and tighten slightly and start the car.Do remember to check your distributor timing whith a warm engine and make sure the sparkplugs and airfilter are okay as each upsets the other.

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1 Answer

Throttle sticking


Spray carb and choke cleaner directly into the throttle body once you have taken off the intake air hoses.Aim sraight at the butterfly in the throttle housing,this will get rid of the carbon build up that is causeing your problem.

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1 Answer

The initial ignition of the day turned on quickly, but the ignition during the day it takes longer to start the engine.


Are you also losing fuel economy? Is the vehicle still warmed up/hot when you are trying to start it again? How many miles have you driven since the last time the throttle body was cleaned? Does it also have a rough idle until it's warmed up?

My guess for now is that the electronic choke/IAC valve is gummed up and sticking. When a vehicle is cold, the valve is supposed to stay open until it is warmed up and the idle speed goes to normal as it reaches operating temperature at which time the valve will close. When the throttle body gets hot, the carbon build up and mixture of any oil that will get on the valve gets sticky so when it needs to open it is slow to do so. If you don't know what the electronic choke or IAC valve is for your Jeep, look it up on a parts website, find it on your vehicle, remove it and clean it with a throttle body cleaner and replace...make sure you don't lose any gaskets attached to it.

May 08, 2009 | Jeep Wrangler Cars & Trucks

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