Question about 1999 Pontiac Grand Am GT

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Coolant pouring out surge tank

Since the car started over heating i have changed the water pump ,thermostat,had the radiator flushed change the relays, fuses and now i have no heat one hose gets hot and the other one dont! it will bleed air out of the bleeder screw then push all the water out the surge tank and turn to steam no heat coming off radiator

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  • psalms2 Nov 22, 2008

    I have the same problem I also just changed the thermostat. I was told it could be the head gaskets don't know what to think. I thought I put the thermostat in correctly maybe not please explain how it goes in I ask this simply because it was three weeks ago when I changed it out and it worked fine until the other day

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If one radiator hose gets hot and the other doesnt, the the thermostat is shot, but you said you replaced it, it is possible the thermostat has been put in backwards

Posted on Nov 21, 2008

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2 Answers

Car over heats


I had a similar problem with our second 2005 Equinox. If the core is clogged, a proper flush is done by hooking garden hose adapters to both heater hoses and reversing the flow numerous times until all debris stops coming from it. Hook the hoses up again and perform a proper and complete system flush with the thermostat removed from the engine. My GM service manual suggests changing the thermostat after the complete system flush is done.
In our case, I put a flush attachment in line with the hose line that feeds the bottom of the surge tank and opened the drain plug on the bottom of the drivers side of the radiator. If you remove it, and nothing flows, use a firm yet still flexible long piece of thin round plastic to probe around the entry point until you break through the hardened sludge in there. You cannot send the probe straight in as there is a support inside of the port, probe at an angle until through. Flush very thoroughly and be patient to get it all out. Done correctly, you won't have to do it again for 150 k miles. Remember to replace the thermostat.
Important when filling, place in park, set the hand brake and chock wheels. Jack the forward right side of the car at that jacking point about 2 to 3 inches to orient the engine correctly to remove air from the system. Open the air bleed screw at the top of the water pump tower to let air bleed while you pour the correct orange Dexcool and water 50/50 mix into the surge tank. Once the air turns to steady flow of coolant with no spitting or bubbles from the tower, snug the screw down, but don't over tighten. You can lower the car at this point. Fill the tank to an inch above the seam halfway up inside of the tank, close the surge tank cap and start the car with the heater on full blast until the water has heated the surge tank very warm to the touch. Turn the engine off and wait for the engine to cool. Carefully remove the surge cap, very slowly to allow pressurized air to bleed, do not open while hot- ever!
Add more 50/50 mix of Dexcool to an inch above the inside seam of the tank. The service manual calls this process thermal cycling to remove all air pockets that remain. You are done with this process when you no longer have to add coolant to cover the inside tank seam after engine cool down.
Finally, and just as importantly, get cooling system sealing pellets from any GM dealer and the next time the engine is cool, drop all 5 pellets in the surge tank. They can be crushed before putting in the tank but I think dropping them in whole allows for a better and smoother application throughout the cooling system that avoids clogging the heater core. If you don't use these pellets after a coolant flush and change, your engine will weep coolant out of the head gasket near the #1 cylinder and will weep into the #1 cylinder. Pressurized hot gases will also leech into your water jacket at this same point which will promote solids forming in your coolant.
This whole process is pretty tedious but worth it in the long run. After I cured all of the cooling system issues with our car, I've come to really appreciate the darned good engineering that went into the drivetrain of the Equinox. Most of the problems in our car were caused by folks not following the rules when servicing the cooling system but while getting this worked out, I've picked up a good understanding of the modern fully closed high pressure GM cooling system. Best of luck!

Apr 10, 2014 | 2005 Chevrolet Equinox

1 Answer

Fluid not coming out


I think you are trying to bleed the radiator. I have pasted an earlier post regarding a similar cooling system issue. I hope this helps.


I had a similar problem with our second 2005 Equinox. If the core is clogged, a proper flush is done by hooking garden hose adapters to both heater hoses and reversing the flow numerous times until all debris stops coming from it. Hook the hoses up again and perform a proper and complete system flush with the thermostat removed from the engine. My GM service manual suggests changing the thermostat after the complete system flush is done.
In our case, I put a flush attachment in line with the hose line that feeds the bottom of the surge tank and opened the drain plug on the bottom of the drivers side of the radiator. If you remove it, and nothing flows, use a firm yet still flexible long piece of thin round plastic to probe around the entry point until you break through the hardened sludge in there. You cannot send the probe straight in as there is a support inside of the port, probe at an angle until through. Flush very thoroughly and be patient to get it all out. Done correctly, you won't have to do it again for 150 k miles. Remember to replace the thermostat.
Important when filling, place in park, set the hand brake and chock wheels. Jack the forward right side of the car at that jacking point about 2 to 3 inches to orient the engine correctly to remove air from the system. Open the air bleed screw at the top of the water pump tower to let air bleed while you pour the correct orange Dexcool and water 50/50 mix into the surge tank. Once the air turns to steady flow of coolant with no spitting or bubbles from the tower, snug the screw down, but don't over tighten. You can lower the car at this point. Fill the tank to an inch above the seam halfway up inside of the tank, close the surge tank cap and start the car with the heater on full blast until the water has heated the surge tank very warm to the touch. Turn the engine off and wait for the engine to cool. Carefully remove the surge cap, very slowly to allow pressurized air to bleed, do not open while hot- ever!
Add more 50/50 mix of Dexcool to an inch above the inside seam of the tank. The service manual calls this process thermal cycling to remove all air pockets that remain. You are done with this process when you no longer have to add coolant to cover the inside tank seam after engine cool down.
Finally, and just as importantly, get cooling system sealing pellets from any GM dealer and the next time the engine is cool, drop all 5 pellets in the surge tank. They can be crushed before putting in the tank but I think dropping them in whole allows for a better and smoother application throughout the cooling system that avoids clogging the heater core. If you don't use these pellets after a coolant flush and change, your engine will weep coolant out of the head gasket near the #1 cylinder and will weep into the #1 cylinder. Pressurized hot gases will also leech into your water jacket at this same point which will promote solids forming in your coolant.
This whole process is pretty tedious but worth it in the long run. After I cured all of the cooling system issues with our car, I've come to really appreciate the darned good engineering that went into the drivetrain of the Equinox. Most of the problems in our car were caused by folks not following the rules when servicing the cooling system but while getting this worked out, I've picked up a good understanding of the modern fully closed high pressure GM cooling system. Best of luck!

Mar 16, 2014 | Chevrolet Equinox Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My car is over heating and io replaced my head gaskit and its still over heatting wat could it b


There is a very specific coolant replacement procedure for the 2005, 6 Equinox. Below is a paste from another answer related to the cooling system that may help. Look for the refill procedure, but perhaps a full flush, as be in order as well.


I had a similar problem with our second 2005 Equinox. If the core is clogged, a proper flush is done by hooking garden hose adapters to both heater hoses and reversing the flow numerous times until all debris stops coming from it. Hook the hoses up again and perform a proper and complete system flush with the thermostat removed from the engine. My GM service manual suggests changing the thermostat after the complete system flush is done.
In our case, I put a flush attachment in line with the hose line that feeds the bottom of the surge tank and opened the drain plug on the bottom of the drivers side of the radiator. If you remove it, and nothing flows, use a firm yet still flexible long piece of thin round plastic to probe around the entry point until you break through the hardened sludge in there. You cannot send the probe straight in as there is a support inside of the port, probe at an angle until through. Flush very thoroughly and be patient to get it all out. Done correctly, you won't have to do it again for 150 k miles. Remember to replace the thermostat.
Important when filling, place in park, set the hand brake and chock wheels. Jack the forward right side of the car at that jacking point about 2 to 3 inches to orient the engine correctly to remove air from the system. Open the air bleed screw at the top of the water pump tower to let air bleed while you pour the correct orange Dexcool and water 50/50 mix into the surge tank. Once the air turns to steady flow of coolant with no spitting or bubbles from the tower, snug the screw down, but don't over tighten. You can lower the car at this point. Fill the tank to an inch above the seam halfway up inside of the tank, close the surge tank cap and start the car with the heater on full blast until the water has heated the surge tank very warm to the touch. Turn the engine off and wait for the engine to cool. Carefully remove the surge cap, very slowly to allow pressurized air to bleed, do not open while hot- ever!
Add more 50/50 mix of Dexcool to an inch above the inside seam of the tank. The service manual calls this process thermal cycling to remove all air pockets that remain. You are done with this process when you no longer have to add coolant to cover the inside tank seam after engine cool down.
Finally, and just as importantly, get cooling system sealing pellets from any GM dealer and the next time the engine is cool, drop all 5 pellets in the surge tank. They can be crushed before putting in the tank but I think dropping them in whole allows for a better and smoother application throughout the cooling system that avoids clogging the heater core. If you don't use these pellets after a coolant flush and change, your engine will weep coolant out of the head gasket near the #1 cylinder and will weep into the #1 cylinder. Pressurized hot gases will also leech into your water jacket at this same point which will promote solids forming in your coolant.
This whole process is pretty tedious but worth it in the long run. After I cured all of the cooling system issues with our car, I've come to really appreciate the darned good engineering that went into the drivetrain of the Equinox. Most of the problems in our car were caused by folks not following the rules when servicing the cooling system but while getting this worked out, I've picked up a good understanding of the modern fully closed high pressure GM cooling system. Best of luck!

Mar 11, 2014 | 2005 Chevrolet Equinox

1 Answer

How do I release air for my coolant system


I am pasting a related earlier post to cover most cooling system issues. Hopefully this helps.



I had a similar problem with our second 2005 Equinox. If the core is clogged, a proper flush is done by hooking garden hose adapters to both heater hoses and reversing the flow numerous times until all debris stops coming from it. Hook the hoses up again and perform a proper and complete system flush with the thermostat removed from the engine. My GM service manual suggests changing the thermostat after the complete system flush is done.
In our case, I put a flush attachment in line with the hose line that feeds the bottom of the surge tank and opened the drain plug on the bottom of the drivers side of the radiator. If you remove it, and nothing flows, use a firm yet still flexible long piece of thin round plastic to probe around the entry point until you break through the hardened sludge in there. You cannot send the probe straight in as there is a support inside of the port, probe at an angle until through. Flush very thoroughly and be patient to get it all out. Done correctly, you won't have to do it again for 150 k miles. Remember to replace the thermostat.
Important when filling, place in park, set the hand brake and chock wheels. Jack the forward right side of the car at that jacking point about 2 to 3 inches to orient the engine correctly to remove air from the system. Open the air bleed screw at the top of the water pump tower to let air bleed while you pour the correct orange Dexcool and water 50/50 mix into the surge tank. Once the air turns to steady flow of coolant with no spitting or bubbles from the tower, snug the screw down, but don't over tighten. You can lower the car at this point. Fill the tank to an inch above the seam halfway up inside of the tank, close the surge tank cap and start the car with the heater on full blast until the water has heated the surge tank very warm to the touch. Turn the engine off and wait for the engine to cool. Carefully remove the surge cap, very slowly to allow pressurized air to bleed, do not open while hot- ever!
Add more 50/50 mix of Dexcool to an inch above the inside seam of the tank. The service manual calls this process thermal cycling to remove all air pockets that remain. You are done with this process when you no longer have to add coolant to cover the inside tank seam after engine cool down.
Finally, and just as importantly, get cooling system sealing pellets from any GM dealer and the next time the engine is cool, drop all 5 pellets in the surge tank. They can be crushed before putting in the tank but I think dropping them in whole allows for a better and smoother application throughout the cooling system that avoids clogging the heater core. If you don't use these pellets after a coolant flush and change, your engine will weep coolant out of the head gasket near the #1 cylinder and will weep into the #1 cylinder. Pressurized hot gases will also leech into your water jacket at this same point which will promote solids forming in your coolant.
This whole process is pretty tedious but worth it in the long run. After I cured all of the cooling system issues with our car, I've come to really appreciate the darned good engineering that went into the drivetrain of the Equinox. Most of the problems in our car were caused by folks not following the rules when servicing the cooling system but while getting this worked out, I've picked up a good understanding of the modern fully closed high pressure GM cooling system. Best of luck!

Jan 15, 2014 | 2005 Chevrolet Equinox

2 Answers

Over heating on my dodge intrepid 1997 after short time of driving


CHECK ENGINE COOLANT LEVEL.MAKE SURE COOLANT OVER FLOW JUG HAS COOLANT IN FULL COLD MARK.IF COOLANT OVER FLOW JUG IS EMPTY RADIATOR GOT TO BE LOW ON COOLANT POUR COOLANT IN THE OVER FLOW UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL STAY AT THE COLD FULL MARK.SEE IF RADIATOR DONT HAVE A RADIATOR CAP YOU HAVE TO POUR COOLANT IN THE OVER FLOW JUG COOLANT WILL FLOW DOWN IN RADIATOR UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL STOP AT FULL COLD MARK.IF COOLANT LEVEL OKAY.YOUR THERMOSTAT NEED CHANGING ALSO RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP.HAVE RADIATOR FLUSHED OUT.HAVE ENGINE BLOCK FLUSHED OUT.CHECK ENGINE OIL IF OIL LOOK LIKE MILK SHAKE ON OIL DIP STICK YOU HAVE LEAKING HEAD GASKET THAT WILL CAUSE ENGINE OVER HEAT WHILE CAR IN MOTION.CHECK WATER PUMP MAKE SURE ITS WEEP HOLE NOT LEAKING ANTIFREEZE IF SO WATER PUMP NEED REPLACING.

Jun 20, 2011 | 1997 Dodge Intrepid

1 Answer

The water boils out of the coolant surge tank, and also is over heating


try change out thermostat maybe staying shut-radiator fins plugged wash out outside with hose and water. radiator may be plugged in cooling tubes flush out cooling system-check fan and water pump belt-fan bearings or water pump could be going bad and not moving water

Jan 17, 2011 | 2004 Chevrolet Aveo

2 Answers

Water is flowing changed the thermostat and the


are you sure you bleeded the air out correctly. These are a pain sometimes. Water pump blades are know to fall apart and this could also clog up the system almost anywhere

Jul 17, 2009 | 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2 Answers

OVERHEATING


This could be a multitude of things:

Stuck closed thermostat.

Cooling fan not coming on.

Clogged radiator.

Low on coolant.

Water pump failing/leaking.

Head gasket blown, leaking exhaust into antifreeze.

Clogged catalytic converter.

Thermostat: If the Van heats up, then feel the upper radiator hose. If it's cold, then your thermostat is closed. Replace thermostat.

Coolant: If low, simply fill with distilled water and coolant. Low levels will let engine over heat.

Radiator: If there are cold-to-the-touch spots on the radiator after it should be warmed up, then a clogged is probably occuring. Have radiator flushed.

Head Gasket: If you smell exhaust fumes in your coolant reservois tank, then you got a blown head gasket.

Cat Converter: Only can be tested if off the car. Or you could try a non-contact thermometer. These are also good to testing cold spot on radiator or if thermostats are open.

Cooling fan: If mechanical it'll be spinning. If electrical, it should come on automatically with the A/C, or when it gets hot.

Water pump: Will be leaking from the front if it needs replaced. On a van, it's a tough job.

Good luck!

Feb 10, 2009 | 1995 Ford Econoline

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