Question about 2002 Saturn Sl

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Heater 2002 saturn sl1 poor air flow

Fan works but heat is low and third setting not working
Do I need a new sensor or motor?

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  • losloboss Dec 11, 2008

    low heat, fan runs low flow, 30 minutes to thaw windows. thermostats changed twice, heating coil fushed as advd by Saturn. Compete winterised package good for -50C/-58 F. & new battery. 65000k/40389 miles.

    Mechanic says can't find problem.

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A leaking A/C unit tends to get grimy, decreasing air flow. Have your refrigerant pressure checked, If it is low, have the mechanic open up the HVAC system and clean the grime off the AC condenser with some solvent, or do an expensive A/C repair. Also of note: Some 2002 SL models were equipped with cabin air filters. If you have one, get it replaced.

Posted on Jan 07, 2009

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1984 f150 straight 6 300 overheating problems


-Check water. If it's low add more.
-If water is full then the thermostat is not open when temperature reach above its setting.
-Test the thermostat . If it's not working then replace new one.
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Good luck


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I have a 96 ford probe and it keeps over heating rad. Is full the over flow is full and just put in a new thermo in it please help


You have an Electric cooling fan. Most cooling fans have 2 speeds and if the high speed is not working, eventually the low speed will not keep up and you will overheat.

The cooling fan depends on Electric relays and a temperature sensor on the motor. This sensor on the motor can be different than the sensor that makes your dash gauge work. Go to Autozone or Orellys for a free scan and view the part you need.

If possible, when the engine is cold take off the Radiator cap and have it tested for the amount of Pressure it will hold before letting the coolant go to the overflow. When the engine is running turn on the heater in case you have an airlock in the water system.

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1 Answer

Cooling fans not running


HI. I have a very thorough, step by step procedure that will help troubleshoot this issue. follow carefully, to isolate the problem, Use extreme caution when preforming this inspection procedure.



1.Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.


2.Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.


3.Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.


4.Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.


5.Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.


6.Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.


7.Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Aug 24, 2010 | 2000 Toyota Sienna

1 Answer

My radiator fan is not coming on even when the a/c is running.


HI. I have a very thorough, step by step procedure that will help troubleshoot this issue. follow carefully, to isolate the problem, Use extreme caution when preforming this inspection procedure.


Step1

Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.

Step2
Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.

Step3

Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.

Step4
Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.

Step5
Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.

Step6
Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.

Step7
Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Nov 07, 2009 | 1993 Saturn SL2

2 Answers

Cooling fan only works when ac is on


You will need to check the fan relay, fuse and temp sending until The fan is turned on automatically when you turn to ac and defrost. The rest of the time it is controlled by pressure. I doubt it is the fuse because it is working on ac. Good news is that you can still get heat just by leaving it on ac but putting your temp all the way up until you find the problem. (assuming you are in an area like I am where it is getting coooolddd out there.

Hoe this helps.

Nov 06, 2009 | 2002 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

Cooling fan is not working


HI. I have a very thorough, step by step procedure that will help troubleshoot this issue. follow carefully, to isolate the problem, Use extreme caution when preforming this inspection procedure.


Step1
Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.

Step2
Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.

Step3

Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.

Step4
Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.

Step5
Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.

Step6

Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.

Step7

Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Nov 05, 2009 | 2001 Volkswagen Beetle

1 Answer

Cooling fan is not coming on . the fuse is intact.


HI. Here is a step by step troubleshooting guide that will help you isolate the issue. use caution, and follow carefully.

Step1
Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.
Step2
Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.
Step3
Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.
Step4
Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.
Step5
Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.
Step6
Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.
Step7
Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

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1 Answer

2003 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER AWD, THE RAD. FANS DON'T COME ON WHEN THEY SHOULD. I HAVE PUT NEW CONTROL MUDULE, TEMP. SENDING UNIT, THERMOSTAT AND THEY STILL DON'T WORK. WHEN THE CAR IS RUNNING AND I TAP ON...


Use this thorough testing procedure to troubleshoot this issue.

Step1
Check for broken wires or loose connectors around the fan circuit. Inspect connectors at the fan motor, relay, sensor or heat sensitive switch, and the Electronic Control Module (ECM)--your car’s computer control system. Also, make sure to check for a possible blown fan fuse. These are common and overlooked troublesome spots that may cause a fan to fail.
Step2
Run and bring the engine to warm temperature. With the engine running, use a voltage test light to check for power to the motor fan. Be extra careful and make sure to keep your hands and tools away from the belt, fan or any other engine moving parts. If voltage is reaching the fan motor, the test light should glow.
Step3
Turn off the engine after you see the light glow. Apply direct voltage to the fan motor from your car battery using a pair of spare wires. If the fan fails to operate, replace the fan motor. If the motor operates, your problem is in the motor connector.
Step4
Locate the heat-sensitive switch or heating sensor if the fan motor operates with direct voltage and the test light did not glow. You should find the sensor in the radiator, engine block, or thermostat housing.
Step5
Measure the resistance across the heating sensor with the multimeter. With the engine at cool temperature (engine off), it should register infinite resistance; with the engine at warm temperature (engine off), you should read low resistance. If both readings state infinite resistance install a new heating sensor, that’s the cause of your failing fan.
Step6
Check the action of the fan relay if the heating sensor is registering variable resistance. Your service manual should specify the power and ground wires according to color codes and the proper way to test it. If the fan relay fails the test replace it with a new one.
Step7
Check the connections going to the ECM after you determine the fan relay is working properly. If you find broken wires or loose connectors, make the necessary repairs. If you suspect a defective ECM take your vehicle to a service shop for a computer analysis. In most cases, the ECM is rare to be the cause of a failing fan. The above steps should take you to the root cause of your problem and help you fix the cooler fan.

Aug 27, 2009 | 2003 Mitsubishi Outlander

3 Answers

Van chevrolet venture 2000


Fifteen minutes! you have bigger problems than only the fans the fans are controlled by a thermo switch that is heated by the coolant, If you have no coolant the sensor cannot activate But fifteen minutes seems like you may have a headgasket problem and steam cannot heat the coolant sensor.OperationNotesThe electric cooling fan operates when the engine cooling temperature exceeds a certain value. The cooling fan on this engine is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) . The PCM turns the cooling fan ON by grounding the coil of the cooling fan relays when certain conditions are met. When the A/C is requested, the cooling fan will also be turned ON.

Power for the cooling fan motors are supplied through Maxifuses(R). The cooling fan relays are energized when current flows from the fuses in the Underhood Accessory Wiring Junction Block, and through the relay coils to ground through the PCM. The Coolant Fan 1 Relay Control Circuit is grounded for low speed fans operation. During low speed fans operation, both fans run at a slow speed. The Coolant Fan 1 Relay Control Circuit is grounded for high speed operation. During high speed fans operation, both fans run at high speed.

IMPORTANT: When certain Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) are present, the PCM may command the cooling fans to run all the time. Perform the A Powertrain On Board Diagnostic (OBD) System Check prior to diagnosing the engine cooling fans.

For more information regarding the Charging System, refer to Charging System Description , and Charging System Circuit Description in Starting and Charging.

If a problem that involves the low speed cooling fan relay control circuit exists, DTC P0480 Cooling Fan Relay 1 Control Circuit should set. If the problem affects the high speed cooling fan relay control circuit, DTC P0481 Cooling Fan Relay 2 Control Circuit should set. A problem with the ECT sensor should set DTC P0117 Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Sensor Circuit Low Voltage, DTC P0118 Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Sensor Circuit High Voltage, DTC P1114 Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Sensor Circuit Intermittent Low Voltage, DTC P1115 Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Sensor Circuit Intermittent High Voltage. Any of these DTCs will affect cooling fan operation and should be diagnosed before using the Electric Cooling Fan Diagnosis.

For more information regarding the Cooling System refer to Engine Cooling Fan Description - Electric, and Cooling System Description in Cooling System.


Here is the electrical schematic and how it all is suppose to work,
If you need any further help please contact me Thank you,Randy If you find this information helpful please give me a good rating

www.aceautomotive1.com

Aug 16, 2008 | 2000 Chevrolet Venture

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