Question about Chevrolet C1500

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Bump sterring I have a 1956 Chevy truck with a 1977 volare front clip. The truck had a new sterring box installed and some tie rod ends and a alinment. All this work helped but didn't fix it.This is the problem when the truck is on the ground the front wheels are straight. When you jack the truck up the drivers side wheel stays straight but the other side toes out. When you let it down it goes back to straight The truck goes straight but when you turn it's all over the place. Every thing seams to be tight. The tie rods on both sides are both 12'' long.I am thinking maybe lower ball joint or lower controll arm? I need some help to fix this. Thank You Ron

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  • rmdarb Nov 19, 2008

    Bump sterring is when you hit a bump the front tires go one way or the other without turning the sterring wheel. As for the alinment he said it was within spec and everything was set for a four wheel alinment. I hope that helps.

  • rmdarb Nov 19, 2008

    I found the invoice for the alinment.



    Left Right

    camber -0.3 -0.6

    caster 0.4 0.9

    toe 0.03in 0.03in

    sai 6.0 8.1

    included angle 5.9 7.5



    cross camber 0.3.

    cross caster -0.5

    cross sai -1.9

    total toe 0.05in

  • Evan Jenson
    Evan Jenson May 11, 2010

    '56 Chevy truck w/'77 Plymouth steering....Interesting combo. Did whomever perform the alignment check and/or adjust caster and camber? What were the readings from the alignment? I'm interested in what the end readings from the alignment were. Please post a response, I may be able to be of assistance.

  • yadayada
    yadayada May 11, 2010

    What is BUMP STEERING??

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It appears to me that the right side readings are closer to spec. Look more at the left side. you may have worn ball joints or control arm bushings. Was the donor car wrecked on the left front? could be bent subframe, lower arm or steering knuckle.
The total toe reading is low as well. Should be at 0.13 +/- 0.03. Also as emissionwiz stated, caster is low. . Note L/SAI and Cross SAI on your alignment as well. Hope this helps
L/Camber 0.5 +/- 0.5 Cross Camber 0.3
R/Camber 0.3 +/- 0.5 Cross Caster 0.0 +/- 1.3
Caster 2.5 +/- 1.3. Cross SAI 0.0
L/Toe 0.06 +/- 0.1 Total Toe 0.13 +/-0.03
R/Toe 0.06 +/-0.1
SAI 8.0 +/- 0.5
Included Angle 8.5 +/- 1.0

Posted on Nov 21, 2008

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  • Chevrolet Master
  • 70,346 Answers

This sounds like a caster issue, add more caster

Posted on Nov 19, 2008

  • yadayada
    yadayada Nov 19, 2008

    I take my own time to try and help, This rating of THANKS FOR TRYING IS INAPPROPRIATE.

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1 Answer

How to replace the tie rod end


Tie rod ends are replaceable, whether the steering system is rack and pinion or parallelogram steering system.
f42-02.gif Parallelogram steering system mounts. Figure A - behind front suspension; and Figure B - ahead of front suspension. f42-04.gif A rack and pinion steering system. Tie rod ends are threaded to provide a means of adjusting toe. When a tie rod is replaced, measure the old tie rod assembly before disassembling it. An approximate toe-in adjustment can be made to the new one prior to installation. When removing the old tie rod end, count the number of turns it takes to remove it. Then, turn the new tie rod end onto its threads the same number of turns.
Some vehicles have tie rods that appear to be the same on both ends. The difference is in the threads. One end has left hand threads and the other has right hand threads. It is possible to install the entire shaft backwards (which will work). Mark the tie rod to identify the inner or ourter end before removing it.
Before tightening tie rod clamps, check to see that they are in good condition and are positioned properly so they can be clamped tightly. Before doing a front end adjustment, spray penetrating oil on the threads of the tie rods. Do this during the steering linkage inspection so the lubricant has time to soak in.

Nov 12, 2010 | 2002 Dodge Stratus

2 Answers

My grand limited jeep cherokee shakes when I am going over 45 mphs and I hit a bump in the road. How can I fix it. I had the track bar replace front end alinement two new tires tires balance and rotate now...


Hitting a bump and then having oscillations of the steering whell is a sure sign of worn bushings, tie rod ends or an internally worn power steering box. The only way to find out is to jak the front of the car up and then rest the car on jack stands from the FRAME of the far. Then grasp each tire / wheel at 3 and 9 o'clock pushing and pulling while checking for any signs of movement or looseness. Your checking the ball joints, control arms, wheel or spindle bearings and tie rods for wear. Also grasp the tire at 6 and 12 o'clock positions and check for movement in sterring components. The people that did the alignment should have mentioned that you had steering or suspension component wear. They also should have stated that they can not do an alignment without repairing / replacing the worn components. Any wear in steering or suspension parts will cause the symptom that you described. If you just had the alignment.... take the car back to the shop and have them re-check the suspension parts for wear. Most alignments come with a 30 day warranty.

Thanks for using FixYa.

Kelly

Jun 09, 2010 | 1993 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

How to replace tie rod ends


1. Loosen the wheel lug nuts. Raise the front of the vehicle and support it with jack stands.
2. Hold the tie rod end with vice grips or a pipe wrench and loosen the jamb nut (the nut at the inner end of the tie rod).
3. At the other end of the tie rod remove the cotter pin and remove the castle nut.
4. The tie rod end will come out by turning counter clockwise. Before turning it grip the inner tie rod with pliers (the part on the other side of the jamb nut) so that it doesn't turn. Count exactly how many turns it takes to remove the tie rod end.
5. Turn the new tie rod end in exactly the same number of turns that were required to remove the old one. Tighten the jamb nut up against the new part.
6. Re-install the castle nut and replace the cotter pin with a new one.
7. Re-install the wheel and lug nuts. Re-torqe them with the vehicle back on the ground.
8. It is a good idea to replace both tie rod ends at the same time and to get a front end alignment afterwards.
I hope this helps.

Mar 25, 2010 | 1998 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

Front wheels shake when I hit a bump in road


Pitman arm and tie rod ends and bail joints.The three main causes of front end shake after hitting a bump.There's so much slop that when you hit a bump it shakes violently from one end of the slop to the other.Very dangerous!You need to get this fixed now!
Get someone to turn the steering wheel while holding onto a front wheel and just watch for stuff that moves.Turn left and right and you'll see what's the worst for wear.The connections at the steering box arm(Pitman) and at the wheels(Tie rods) will be what moves the worst.Hope this helps?Autozone has a kit for the pitman for $100,probably be $600 at a shop.

Jan 11, 2010 | 1994 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Front end wobble at 50 mph or when I hit a bump or pot hole in my 2005 Wrangler


Your tie rod nut needs tightning, the extra play causes the front end to vibrate or wobble your vehicle and sterring wheel.

look under the car where your steering wheel gear box connects to the tie rod, see if the nut and carter key have slop in it.

if so, take the carter key out and tighten the nut and then replace the carter key as it was.

the test it on some bumps and potholes.

Sep 13, 2009 | 2005 Jeep Wrangler

1 Answer

Rack pinions and bushing installement


pretty decent job ahead first jack up car support with jack stands remove front wheels remove nuts on tie rod ends remove tie rod ends from spindles with tie rod end tool or tap with malet were they sit to loosen them hit the spindle area not the tie rod or tie rod threads then dissconnect power steering lines from steering rack also disconect steering linkage to rack there should be 2 main bolts holding assembly to frame remove them should free rack i know that car may have a unique design were u may have to remove inner tie rod ends first if it has those round bushings that always go bad disconect inner tie rod ends behind engine on top of steering rack then remove rack from wheel well replace those inner tie rod bushings u may be able to leave outer tie rod end connected to spindles and u may be able to get to the sterring rack from behind engine good luck

Mar 28, 2009 | 1997 Chrysler Concorde

1 Answer

88 chevy van sterring tie rod


I'm just going to tell ya the whole proccess of replacing tie rods. First thing is to make sure you got the nut on the back side of the tierod free. Use a vice grip and a wrench to do so. Once that's done, remove crown nut. You know, the nut that has notches in it. Do your best to remove cotter pin. If you can't, well it's still possible just harder to do so. Then, use a hammer and hit the end where the crown nut was. Once tie rod is off on that end, twist tie rod off. COUNT the number of turns it takes you to do so. Then put new one on with same number of turns. You should get an alingment done afterwards. If you don't want too, be prepared to spend money in tires in the near future.

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1 Answer

Tie rod inner or outter/how to install


here is word for word what the manual says:

REMOVAL:
1. Loosen the front wheel lug nuts on the side to be dismanteld. Raise the vehicle and support it securely on jack stands. CAUTION: If the vehicle is equipped with Automatic Ride Control (ARC), make sure the air suspention switch is turned to the OFF position before the vehicle is riased to prevent damage to the system components.

2. Remove the front wheel.

3. Remove the cotter pin and loosen the nut on the tie-rod end stud. Discard the cotter pin.

4. Disconnect the tie-rod end fron the steering spindel with a Pitman arm puller.

5. Loosen the tie-rod end jam nut and back it off several turns.

6. Apply a paint mark to the theads adjacent to the adjusting sleeve or tie-rod end. Unscrew the tie-rod end from the adjusting sleeve or connecting rod.

INSTALLATION:
7. Install the tie-rod end into the adjusting sleeve or connecting rod. Thread the tie-rob end in until the marks made on step 6 align.

8. Install the tie-rod end to the spindle. Make sure the front wheels and steering wheel are in the stright ahead position. Make sure the tie-rod stud is seated in the taper to prevent it from turing while tightening the nut.

9. Install the new nut on the stud and tighent it to the proper torque (45-60 ft-lbs). Install a new cotter pin and bend the ends over completely.

10. Tighten the tie-rod adjusting sleever clap bolts or jam nut to 50-68 ft-lbs. Make sure the tie-rod is posistioned correctly in the same posistion it was in before it was removed.

11. Install the wheel and lug nuts. Lower the vehicle and tighten the lug nuts.

12. get the front end aligned.

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