Question about 2005 Mazda 6

2 Answers

No spark in '05 Mazda 6

Switched bad engine (2.3L 4 cylinder) , kept old wiring harness. Replacement engine had one individual coil pack mounted on side of head, which was removed. Used individual plug coil packs from old engine with ready wiring from old harness. There is no spark. Fuses are good, seems to be grounded OK.
Any suggestions out there as to how to hunt down the problem. Thanks

Posted by on

  • 1 more comment 
  • Barc4723 Nov 25, 2008

    Problem resolved!
    I called the Mazda dealers in this area and in one breath, one breath they could have said that there has to be component changes for you to get a spark, they didn't even have to tell me which ones if they didn't want, I would have figured it out. They said absolutely nothing but "tow it in, we charge $90 an hour." Also, when it comes to buying any technical component- a part from a transmission, etc.- don't look for Mazda to even want to sell it to you. They will flat tell you "we don't like to sell those and would rather our shop to do the work." If they will sell it, they will want to sell you either the entire transmission, or some small basic component part that will cost almost as much as the entire transmission. For example, try to buy a transmission oil pump component and they will want to sell you the entire oil pump, a manufactured piece of metal that can fit in the palm of both hands for about $450. (The American dream must be good!) So much for Mazda!

    Basically, the problem was this simple, as usual. A single pack coil component- one coil does all- (which my replacement engine had) does function basically in the same manner as all of these distributor less engines (with the computer receiving information from the crank position sensor and camshaft position sensor then interpreting that information, making necessary adjustments, and then sending out the need voltage pulses for the specific ignition system), however the information must be specific to the type of ignition system you have (one coil or multiple coils over each plug). It is the crankshaft pulley and the specific type crankshaft that gives the computer the specific information for either one of the two systems. So, if you swap engines, you can't just think you can plug on some adapter to make up the differences in ignition coils. There is no such thing. If your two engines have different coil ignition systems, you must also swap out the crank pulley and camshaft, making sure you have the correct and specific ones for your type of coil ignition system, or you would never get a spark. If you only swap the crank pulley you will get a spark but the engine will never start, it takes both the information from the crank and the camshaft for it to run. The camshaft also has to be swapped out. Compare the components by sight and you will see the differences in the tabs around the crank pulley, and the metal prong tabs at the end of the intake camshaft. The exhaust camshaft will not be any different, you can swap that one out too if you please. Without swapping out both of these components making sure the specific components match up with the correct ignition coil system, the car will never fire. It is a job but has to be done, and the car will run properly.

    The crank position sensor is located on the bottom of engine by the crank as expected and, as with all sensors, you will see a wire running to it. You can loosen the two bolts and adjust it, or "tweak" it, to affect the timing a little. The camshaft position sensor is located at the end of the valve head cover just above those metal prong tabs at the end of the camshaft, as expected. There are a few different types of sensors but that information one can look up. If either of these components go bad, your car will not start. They are easily replaced however. Usually the adjustments on whatever type of sensor you have is not extremely critical in getting the car to start if they are out of adjustment.

    Also, another great learning experience here. If you swap out engines, depending upon where you buy the replacement engine, it could have been completely drained of oil. If it has and has been sitting for more than a week or so, it will go into a "dry" condition. Even if you put oil in the engine, that is not sufficient to give the engine the required oil it needs and protect the bearings and other components, especially in newer engines, and especially if components have been changed. If the engine is not completely flooded with oil and the pump ready to start pumping oil the moment, the moment the engine is turned over, you are going to "spin some bearings" at the very least. This means the unoiled metal rubbing on metal will wear down the bearing almost instantaneously. The bearing is just a half circle of metal that is soft metal and fits between any shaft and the component that connects to it. There are top and bottom parts to make the complete ring. The design is set that way so the bearings will wear before the major components such as the crank or the connecting rods that must be connected together around the shaft. Once the bearing is worn the least bit, the connecting rods that push the pistons up and down will shake, rattle, and slap around creating that "knock" in the engine that you always hear everyone talking about- bad, very bad. In a short while, if unattended, this will shake until something happens to the piston. If that breaks or broken metal falls into the cylinder wall, it will gouge the cylinder wall- very, very bad. Those walls must be smooth or oil will leak through and go to places it should not go, or be blown out of the engine without doing its normal function. Sometimes the cost of replacing that cylinder sleeve, or re-boring out the cylinder (if the gouge is not too bad) will cost almost as much as an engine replacement. So, "turning a bearing" is no minor thing. Without proper oil the engine will do that in just a couple of cranks and turns of the engine because you will have metal components rubbing on metal components. So, you must flood the crank area with oil, and if there is a way to prime the oil pump that must be done, unfortunately I don't know how so can't give you that info.

    Anyone out there have new and cheap connecting rod bearings for a Mazda6 2.3L engine? Yea, except for forums like this we all seem to learn the hard way. God bless.

  • Barc4723 Nov 25, 2008

    Problem resolved!
    I called the Mazda dealers in this area and in one breath, one breath they could have said that there has to be component changes for you to get a spark, they didn't even have to tell me which ones if they didn't want, I would have figured it out. They said absolutely nothing but "tow it in, we charge $90 an hour." Also, when it comes to buying any technical component- a part from a transmission, etc.- don't look for Mazda to even want to sell it to you. They will flat tell you "we don't like to sell those and would rather our shop to do the work." If they will sell it, they will want to sell you either the entire transmission, or some small basic component part that will cost almost as much as the entire transmission. For example, try to buy a transmission oil pump component and they will want to sell you the entire oil pump, a manufactured piece of metal that can fit in the palm of both hands for about $450. (The American dream must be good!) So much for Mazda!

    Basically, the problem was this simple, as usual. A single pack coil component- one coil does all- (which my replacement engine had) does function basically in the same manner as all of these distributor less engines (with the computer receiving information from the crank position sensor and camshaft position sensor then interpreting that information, making necessary adjustments, and then sending out the need voltage pulses for the specific ignition system), however the information must be specific to the type of ignition system you have (one coil or multiple coils over each plug). It is the crankshaft pulley and the specific type crankshaft that gives the computer the specific information for either one of the two systems. So, if you swap engines, you can't just think you can plug on some adapter to make up the differences in ignition coils. There is no such thing. If your two engines have different coil ignition systems, you must also swap out the crank pulley and camshaft, making sure you have the correct and specific ones for your type of coil ignition system, or you would never get a spark. If you only swap the crank pulley you will get a spark but the engine will never start, it takes both the information from the crank and the camshaft for it to run. The camshaft also has to be swapped out. Compare the components by sight and you will see the differences in the tabs around the crank pulley, and the metal prong tabs at the end of the intake camshaft. The exhaust camshaft will not be any different, you can swap that one out too if you please. Without swapping out both of these components making sure the specific components match up with the correct ignition coil system, the car will never fire. It is a job but has to be done, and the car will run properly.

    The crank position sensor is located on the bottom of engine by the crank as expected and, as with all sensors, you will see a wire running to it. You can loosen the two bolts and adjust it, or "tweak" it, to affect the timing a little. The camshaft position sensor is located at the end of the valve head cover just above those metal prong tabs at the end of the camshaft, as expected. There are a few different types of sensors but that information one can look up. If either of these components go bad, your car will not start. They are easily replaced however. Usually the adjustments on whatever type of sensor you have is not extremely critical in getting the car to start if they are out of adjustment.

    Also, another great learning experience here. If you swap out engines, depending upon where you buy the replacement engine, it could have been completely drained of oil. If it has and has been sitting for more than a week or so, it will go into a "dry" condition. Even if you put oil in the engine, that is not sufficient to give the engine the required oil it needs and protect the bearings and other components, especially in newer engines, and especially if components have been changed. If the engine is not completely flooded with oil and the pump ready to start pumping oil the moment, the moment the engine is turned over, you may "spin some bearings" at the very least. This means the unoiled metal rubbing on metal will wear down the bearing. The bearing is just a half circle of metal that is soft metal and fits between any shaft and the component that connects to it. There are top and bottom parts to make the complete ring. The design is set that way so the bearings will wear before the major components such as the crank or the connecting rods that must be connected together around the shaft. Once the bearing is worn, the connecting rods that push the pistons up and down will shake, rattle, and slap around creating that "knock" in the engine that you always hear everyone talking about- bad, very bad. In a short while, if unattended, this will shake until something happens to the piston. If the piston ruptures or metal breaks off and falls into the cylinder wall, it will gouge the cylinder wall- very, very bad. Those walls must be smooth or oil will leak through and go to places it should not go, or be blown out of the engine without doing its normal function. Sometimes the cost of replacing that cylinder sleeve, or re-boring out the cylinder (if the gouge is not too bad) will cost almost as much as an engine replacement. So, "turning a bearing" is no minor thing. Make certain there is sufficient oil in the engine and components are lthoroughly coated or you will have metal components rubbing on metal components. God bless.

  • yadayada
    yadayada May 11, 2010

    Recheck your work, it is something you did wrong, no way to tell from here.

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Any wires not plugged into there respective places, any sensors the old engine had that this one don't, did you use the old distributor for your coil setup,I think it might be, luck

Posted on Feb 01, 2010

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  • 308 Answers

The spark of the comes from the battery . there for the problem is in the coil.

Posted on Jul 25, 2009

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What is the firing order for a 2001 mazda tribute 6 cylinder spark plug and coil


Here's the information you are looking for:

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COIL PACK WIRING DIAGRAM


The coil pack wiring is relatively straightforward though the exact wiring, colours and suchlike will vary a little from car to car.

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The same effect can be obtained by using a single coil per two cylinders of a type which has a single secondary winding which is completely isolated or not grounded in any way. One end feeds one spark plug and the other end is also terminated in a spark plug wire and terminal.

This simplification means the coil pack (4 cylinder example) is fed by only three or four wires (usually four).

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What is the Wire Order with distributor?


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For the Buick V6 231 3.8 liter turbocharged engine:
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Answers!
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Firing order:
1 - 6 - 5 - 4 - 3 - 2.
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Spark plug wire location on coil pack:
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Closest to the back of the car, left to right: 1 - 5 - 3.
Closest to the front of the car, left to right: 4 - 2 - 6.
.
Spark plug wire location on engine:
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drivers side, front to back of car: 1 - 3 - 5.
passenger side, front to back of car: 2 - 4 - 6.
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3 8 Buick Turbo Engine Coil Pack Firing Order Spark Plug Wire Location

Aug 15, 2015 | 1987 Buick Regal

1 Answer

Spark plugs


Check this SPARK PLUG REPLACEMENT - REMOVAL PROCEDURE

1_23_2012_5_10_32_pm.jpg

1. Remove the ignition coils (lines at end this document), then return here once you have gotten the Coil
Packs off and precede with step 2 from here.
2. Clean the spark plug recesses with low pressure air. CAUTION: Wear safety glasses
when using compressed air, as flying dirt particles may cause eye injury. NOTE:
Clean the spark plug recess area before removing the spark plug. Failure to do so could
result in engine damage because of dirt or foreign material entering the cylinder head, or
by the contamination of the cylinder head threads. The contaminated threads may prevent
the proper seating of the new plug. Use a thread chaser to clean the threads of any
contamination.
3. Remove the spark plugs from the cylinder head. NOTE: Allow the engine to cool before
removing the spark plugs. Attempting to remove the spark plugs from a hot engine may
cause the plug threads to seize, causing damage to cylinder head threads.
4. Inspect the spark plugs.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE

1_23_2012_5_11_30_pm.jpg

1. Measure the spark plug gap on the spark plugs to be installed. Compare the measurement
to the gap specifications. NOTE:
• Use only the spark plugs specified for use in the vehicle. Do not install spark
plugs that are either hotter or colder than those specified for the vehicle. Installing
spark plugs of another type can severely damage the engine.
• Check the gap of all new and reconditioned spark plugs before installation. The
pre-set gaps may have changed during handling. Use a round feeler gage to ensure
an accurate check. Installing the spark plugs with the wrong gap can cause poor
engine performance and may even damage the engine.
2. Install the spark plugs to the cylinder head. NOTE:
• Be sure that the spark plug threads smoothly into the cylinder head and the spark
plug is fully seated. Use a thread chaser, if necessary, to clean threads in the
cylinder head. Cross-threading or failing to fully seat the spark plug can cause
overheating of the plug, exhaust blow-by, or thread damage.
• Refer to Component Fastener Tightening Notice in Service Precautions.
Tighten the spark plugs to 18 N.m (13 lb ft).
3. Install the ignition coils.

IGNITION COIL(S) REPLACEMENT
REMOVAL PROCEDURE
1. Remove the air cleaner resonator and outlet duct.
2. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connector (1) from the oil pressure sensor (2).
3. Disconnect the engine wiring harness retainers (1) from the power steering pump (2).
4. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors (1, 4) from the following:
• The exhaust camshaft position (CMP) sensor (5)
• The camshaft position (CMP) actuator solenoid valve (6)
5. Disconnect the engine wiring harness retainer (2) from the camshaft cover (3).
6. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors from the following:
• The engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor (1)
• The fuel injector harness (2)
• The ignition coils (4)
• The heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) (5)
7. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connector from the intake camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
8. Carefully disengage the engine wiring harness conduit from the camshaft cover, and position aside.
9. Remove the ignition coil bolts.
10. Remove the ignition coils from the camshaft cover.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE
1. Install the ignition coils into the camshaft cover. IMPORTANT: Ensure the ignition coil seals are properly seated to the camshaft cover.
2. Install the ignition coil bolts. NOTE: Refer to Fastener Notice in Service Precautions. Tighten the ignition coil bolts to 10 N.m (89 lb in).
3. Attach the engine wiring harness conduit to the camshaft cover.
4. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connector to the intake CMP sensor.
5. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors to the following:
• The ECT sensor (1)
• The fuel injector harness (2)
• The ignition coils (4)
• The HO2S (5)
6. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors (1, 4) to the following:
• The exhaust CMP sensor (5)
• The CMP actuator solenoid valve (6)
7. Connect the engine wiring harness retainer (2) to the camshaft cover (3).
8. Connect the engine wiring harness retainers (1) to the power steering pump (2).
9. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connector (1) to the oil pressure sensor (2).
10. Install the air cleaner resonator and outlet duct.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jan 23, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to change spark plugs in a 2005 chev colorado


SPARK PLUG REPLACEMENT - REMOVAL PROCEDURE

1_23_2012_5_10_32_pm.jpg

1. Remove the ignition coils (lines at end this document), then return here once you have gotten the Coil
Packs off and precede with step 2 from here.
2. Clean the spark plug recesses with low pressure air. CAUTION: Wear safety glasses
when using compressed air, as flying dirt particles may cause eye injury. NOTE:
Clean the spark plug recess area before removing the spark plug. Failure to do so could
result in engine damage because of dirt or foreign material entering the cylinder head, or
by the contamination of the cylinder head threads. The contaminated threads may prevent
the proper seating of the new plug. Use a thread chaser to clean the threads of any
contamination.
3. Remove the spark plugs from the cylinder head. NOTE: Allow the engine to cool before
removing the spark plugs. Attempting to remove the spark plugs from a hot engine may
cause the plug threads to seize, causing damage to cylinder head threads.
4. Inspect the spark plugs.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE

1_23_2012_5_11_30_pm.jpg

1. Measure the spark plug gap on the spark plugs to be installed. Compare the measurement
to the gap specifications. NOTE:
• Use only the spark plugs specified for use in the vehicle. Do not install spark
plugs that are either hotter or colder than those specified for the vehicle. Installing
spark plugs of another type can severely damage the engine.
• Check the gap of all new and reconditioned spark plugs before installation. The
pre-set gaps may have changed during handling. Use a round feeler gage to ensure
an accurate check. Installing the spark plugs with the wrong gap can cause poor
engine performance and may even damage the engine.
2. Install the spark plugs to the cylinder head. NOTE:
• Be sure that the spark plug threads smoothly into the cylinder head and the spark
plug is fully seated. Use a thread chaser, if necessary, to clean threads in the
cylinder head. Cross-threading or failing to fully seat the spark plug can cause
overheating of the plug, exhaust blow-by, or thread damage.
• Refer to Component Fastener Tightening Notice in Service Precautions.
Tighten the spark plugs to 18 N.m (13 lb ft).
3. Install the ignition coils.

IGNITION COIL(S) REPLACEMENT
REMOVAL PROCEDURE
1. Remove the air cleaner resonator and outlet duct.
2. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connector (1) from the oil pressure sensor (2).
3. Disconnect the engine wiring harness retainers (1) from the power steering pump (2).
4. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors (1, 4) from the following:
• The exhaust camshaft position (CMP) sensor (5)
• The camshaft position (CMP) actuator solenoid valve (6)
5. Disconnect the engine wiring harness retainer (2) from the camshaft cover (3).
6. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors from the following:
• The engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor (1)
• The fuel injector harness (2)
• The ignition coils (4)
• The heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) (5)
7. Disconnect the engine wiring harness electrical connector from the intake camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
8. Carefully disengage the engine wiring harness conduit from the camshaft cover, and position aside.
9. Remove the ignition coil bolts.
10. Remove the ignition coils from the camshaft cover.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE
1. Install the ignition coils into the camshaft cover. IMPORTANT: Ensure the ignition coil seals are properly seated to the camshaft cover.
2. Install the ignition coil bolts. NOTE: Refer to Fastener Notice in Service Precautions. Tighten the ignition coil bolts to 10 N.m (89 lb in).
3. Attach the engine wiring harness conduit to the camshaft cover.
4. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connector to the intake CMP sensor.
5. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors to the following:
• The ECT sensor (1)
• The fuel injector harness (2)
• The ignition coils (4)
• The HO2S (5)
6. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connectors (1, 4) to the following:
• The exhaust CMP sensor (5)
• The CMP actuator solenoid valve (6)
7. Connect the engine wiring harness retainer (2) to the camshaft cover (3).
8. Connect the engine wiring harness retainers (1) to the power steering pump (2).
9. Connect the engine wiring harness electrical connector (1) to the oil pressure sensor (2).
10. Install the air cleaner resonator and outlet duct.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jan 23, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 97 thunderbird V6 3.8L that is misfiring in cylinders 2 and 6. I tested all the plug wires at the plug connection with a calibrated tester, there is no spark at the plug. I have changed the plugs,...


Did you replace the coil pack or just verify 12 volt power to it? if both old and new coil packs have the same issue, (no spark on 2 and 6), then the harness to the coil pack has broken wires or bad connection(in the connector itself), or the computer is faulty. I believe each plug wire tower on the coil pack has it's own signal wire in the harness. Understand that the towers are "paired" together.
For example, cylinder layout.... 1 - 2 - 3
4 - 5 - 6
Depending on the firing order and the actual layout of your cylinder's the above layout would mean
1 and 4 get the signal to spark,(at the same time), even though 1 is on its power stroke, and 4 is on its exhaust stroke. Hope this is clear as mud!

Aug 21, 2011 | 1997 Ford Thunderbird LX

1 Answer

There is a misfire in my engine, changed plugs & wires. now it reads that the fuel leveling sensor is bad, will this help?


If there is a misfire, the cylinder that it is misfiring in will be recorded as a code in the computer.

Have the car scanned to determine which cylinder is bad. Then, replace the coil pack going to that cylinder.

Ignition Coil Pack Removal & Installation 2V Engine To Remove:
  1. Twist the spark plug wires off of the ignition coil towers. Mark the spark plug wire positions so they can be installed in their original positions.
  2. Disconnect the electrical connector from the ignition coil. CAUTION
    When removing the spark plug wires, a slight twisting motion will break the seal and ease removal.
    coilconn.gif

  3. Remove the mounting screws and remove the ignition coil.
To Install:
  1. Position the ignition coil pack on engine.
  2. Install mounting screws and torque to 53 in-lbs. (6 Nm). coilbolt.gif

  3. Connect ignition coil pack electrical connector.
  4. Match previously marked spark plug wires to ignition coil and install.
4V Engine To Remove:
  1. Remove the RH cowl grille cowlpic.gif
  2. Remove the screws and the water shield
  3. Mark spark plug wire positions
  4. Disconnect the spark plug wires from the ignition coil CAUTION
    When removing the spark plug wires a slight twisting motion will break the seal and ease removal.
  5. Disconnect the ignition coil electrical connector coilconn.gif

  6. Remove the mounting screws and remove the ignition coil
To Install:
  1. Position ignition coil pack. Install mounting screws and torque to 56 in-lbs. (6Nm)
    coilbolt.gif

  2. Connect ignition coil pack electrical connector
  3. Match previously marked spark plug wires to ignition coil and install
  4. Position water shield and install screws
  5. Install RH cowl panel
prev.gif next.gif

Aug 11, 2010 | 2002 Ford Taurus

2 Answers

What could be the cause of a p0304 code on my 2005 mazda mpv. the check engine light is blinking


Cylinder 4 is misfiring. Take it to a mechanic and have them take a look at it. Im guessing its the distributor, Spark plug, or spark plug wire on cylinder 4

Dec 09, 2009 | 2005 Mazda MPV

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