Question about 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

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Bad glow plug

I've got a bad glow plug, the code says it is # 2 cylinder. Just checking to make sure, is # 2 cylinder, second from timing belt end or also second from left facing car?

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Cylinders are numbered from the crankshaft pulley end, not from the fly whell end so in your case from the timing cover end

Posted on Nov 13, 2008

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2 Answers

How do remove glow plugs


check current flow to each first.
if zero cuurrent check that they have spec low resistance.
if ok, then the controls are bad or wires ,fuses, etc.

Jun 24, 2015 | 2004 Kia Sedona

1 Answer

Why does my 2002 hyundai elentra misfire?


Is it misfiring on just one cylinder (code 0301, 0302, 0303, 0304 etc.) or multiple/random (code 0300) cylinders?
It takes all 4 ingredients to fire a cylinder - Air, Fuel, Spark, and Timing. If you only have one misfire code (P0302 - Cylinder #2 Misfire), it should be a relatively easy diagnosis and fix. Let's start with Spark. I'm going to assume you have a code reader. First, remove the spark plug in #2 cylinder. Examine the threaded end. Is it wet and/or smell like fuel? If so, chances are the misfire is caused by a weak/absent spark. To confirm, swap it with a known good cylinder - example #3 cylinder. Clear the code. Start it and let it run for a couple of minutes. If a code appears with P0303 (the last digit refers to cylinder number), then you have found the culprit - bad spark plug. If the code reappeared with P0302 (Cylinder #2 again), then swap out the spark plug wire (both ends). Clear the code. Start and run for a couple of minutes. Again, if it appears on Cylinder #3 - the plug wire is the culprit. If the P0302 code comes back, swap the coil. See where this is going?
Now, when you first pulled the plug from Cylinder #2, if it wasn't wet or smelled of fuel, chances are Spark is not the issue. Was the plug dry and/or ashy? Possible cause is no fuel reaching the combustion chamber (cylinder). Using an automotive stethoscope, listen to the fuel injector for cylinder #2 while the motor is running. Should hear a regular and rhythmic ticking sound. Like a fast clock. (Use a long handled screwdriver touching one end to your ear and the other to the top of the injector if you dont have a stethoscope). No clicking or irregular clicking means fuel injector is not working (no sound) or is not working properly. Like searching for the Spark problem, swap the injector in #2 cylinder with #3. Clear code. Start and run. If the problem moved to #3, ithat injector is the culprit. If it stayed on #2, it is likely your wiring to that injector - check the whole harness for loose connections or swelled with oil wires/connectors. Keep pecking away at the fuel delivery system for that cylinder. Stay looking for things that affect only that cylinder.
When you pulled the plug, was it fairly normal looking? Then this misfire code might only be a timing problem. It is likely not a timing problem in your case, because timing affects all cylinders, but I thought I would just mention it since Timing is an important part of combustion. Also, if timing were a culprit here, another code would usually appear signifying the Camshaft Positon Sensor or Crankshaft Position Sensor was/is failed, or it is possible for the timing belt/chain to skip a knurl on a sproket and throw the timing off, but like I said, it would almost always cause multiple/random (Code P0300) misfires.
And finally, when you pulled the plug earlier, if it was an oily sticky mess, then the culprit might be Air - or compression/lack of compression. Lets hope not, because when Air is the cause of a misfire, it is usually an expensive fix. Need to perform a compression test. If you have little or no compression in the cylinder, it is likely a bad head gasket or a stuck/sticky/broken/chipped valve (exhaust or intake). Any of these things are bad news and expensive to fix in a shop. Also bad news and time consuming and difficult task for a shade tree mechanic.
Now, clear that code and get started! Good luck!

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Apr 29, 2014 | 2004 Hyundai Elantra

1 Answer

How do I know which is cylinder 2 on a vortex 4200 ,straight 6?


The #1 cylinder is the one closest to the radiator. Number 2 is just behind #1. It takes all 4 ingredients to fire a cylinder - Air, Fuel, Spark, and Timing. If you only have one misfire code (P0302 - Cylinder #2 Misfire), it should be a relatively easy diagnosis and fix. You mentioned changing the coil, so let's start with Spark. I'm going to assume you have a code reader. First, remove the spark plug in #2 cylinder. Examine the threaded end. Is it wet and/or smell like fuel? If so, chances are the misfire is caused by a weak/absent spark. To confirm, swap it with a known good cylinder - example #3 cylinder. Clear the code. Start it and let it run for a couple of minutes. If a code appears with P0303 (the last digit refers to cylinder number), then you have found the culprit - bad spark plug. If the code reappeared with P0302 (Cylinder #2 again), then swap out the spark plug wire (both ends). Clear the code. Start and run for a couple of minutes. Again, if it appears on Cylinder #3 - the plug wire is the culprit. If the P0302 code comes back, swap the coil. See where this is going?

Now, when you first pulled the plug from Cylinder #2, if it wasn't wet or smelled of fuel, chances are Spark is not the issue. Was the plug dry and/or ashy? Possible cause is no fuel reaching the combustion chamber (cylinder). Using an automotive stethoscope, listen to the fuel injector for cylinder #2 while the motor is running. Should hear a regular and rhythmic ticking sound. Like a fast clock. (Use a long handled screwdriver touching one end to your ear and the other to the top of the injector if you dont have a stethoscope). No clicking or irregular clicking means fuel injector is not working (no sound) or is not working properly. Like searching for the Spark problem, swap the injector in #2 cylinder with #3. Clear code. Start and run. If the problem moved to #3, ithat injector is the culprit. If it stayed on #2, it is likely your wiring to that injector - check the whole harness for loose connections or swelled with oil wires/connectors. Keep pecking away at the fuel delivery system for that cylinder. Stay looking for things that affect only that cylinder.

When you pulled the plug, was it fairly normal looking? Then this misfire code might only be a timing problem. It is likely not a timing problem in your case, because timing affects all cylinders, but I thought I would just mention it since Timing is an important part of combustion. Also, if timing were a culprit here, another code would usually appear signifying the Camshaft Positon Sensor or Crankshaft Position Sensor was/is failed, or it is possible for the timing belt/chain to skip a knurl on a sproket and throw the timing off, but like I said, it would almost always cause multiple/random (Code P0300) misfires.

And finally, when you pulled the plug earlier, if it was an oily sticky mess, then the culprit might be Air - or compression/lack of compression. Lets hope not, because when Air is the cause of a misfire, it is usually an expensive fix. Need to perform a compression test. If you have little or no compression in the cylinder, it is likely a bad head gasket or a stuck/sticky/broken/chipped valve (exhaust or intake). Any of these things are bad news and expensive to fix in a shop. Also bad news and time consuming and difficult task for a shade tree mechanic.

Now, clear that code and get started! Good luck!



Now If

Apr 04, 2014 | 2003 GMC Envoy

1 Answer

1999 fiesta 1 2 misfire on cylnder 2


It takes all 4 ingredients to fire a cylinder - Air, Fuel, Spark, and Timing. If you only have one misfire code (P0302 - Cylinder #2 Misfire), it should be a relatively easy diagnosis and fix. Let's start with Spark. I'm going to assume you have a code reader. First, remove the spark plug in #2 cylinder. Examine the threaded end. Is it wet and/or smell like fuel? If so, chances are the misfire is caused by a weak/absent spark. To confirm, swap it with a known good cylinder - example #3 cylinder. Clear the code. Start it and let it run for a couple of minutes. If a code appears with P0303 (the last digit refers to cylinder number), then you have found the culprit - bad spark plug. If the code reappeared with P0302 (Cylinder #2 again), then swap out the spark plug wire (both ends). Clear the code. Start and run for a couple of minutes. Again, if it appears on Cylinder #3 - the plug wire is the culprit. If the P0302 code comes back, swap the coil. See where this is going?

Now, when you first pulled the plug from Cylinder #2, if it wasn't wet or smelled of fuel, chances are Spark is not the issue. Was the plug dry and/or ashy? Possible cause is no fuel reaching the combustion chamber (cylinder). Using an automotive stethoscope, listen to the fuel injector for cylinder #2 while the motor is running. Should hear a regular and rhythmic ticking sound. Like a fast clock. (Use a long handled screwdriver touching one end to your ear and the other to the top of the injector if you dont have a stethoscope). No clicking or irregular clicking means fuel injector is not working (no sound) or is not working properly. Like searching for the Spark problem, swap the injector in #2 cylinder with #3. Clear code. Start and run. If the problem moved to #3, ithat injector is the culprit. If it stayed on #2, it is likely your wiring to that injector - check the whole harness for loose connections or swelled with oil wires/connectors. Keep pecking away at the fuel delivery system for that cylinder. Stay looking for things that affect only that cylinder.

When you pulled the plug, was it fairly normal looking? Then this misfire code might only be a timing problem. It is likely not a timing problem in your case, because timing affects all cylinders, but I thought I would just mention it since Timing is an important part of combustion. Also, if timing were a culprit here, another code would usually appear signifying the Camshaft Positon Sensor or Crankshaft Position Sensor was/is failed, or it is possible for the timing belt/chain to skip a knurl on a sproket and throw the timing off, but like I said, it would almost always cause multiple/random (Code P0300) misfires.

And finally, when you pulled the plug earlier, if it was an oily sticky mess, then the culprit might be Air - or compression/lack of compression. Lets hope not, because when Air is the cause of a misfire, it is usually an expensive fix. Need to perform a compression test. If you have little or no compression in the cylinder, it is likely a bad head gasket or a stuck/sticky/broken/chipped valve (exhaust or intake). Any of these things are bad news and expensive to fix in a shop. Also bad news and time consuming and difficult task for a shade tree mechanic.

Now, clear that code and get started! Good luck!

Feb 17, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2000 Saturn sc2 has a misfire


It takes all 4 ingredients to fire a cylinder - Air, Fuel, Spark, and Timing. If you only have only one misfire code (example: P0302 - Cylinder #2 Misfire), it should be a relatively easy diagnosis and fix. You didnt mention which cylinder has the misfire, so let's assume it is on Cylinder #2. Start with Spark. I'm going to assume you have a code reader. First, remove the spark plug in #2 cylinder. Examine the threaded end. Is it wet and/or smell like fuel? If so, chances are the misfire is caused by a weak/absent spark. To confirm, swap it with a known good cylinder - example #3 cylinder. Clear the code. Start it and let it run for a couple of minutes. If a code appears with P0303 (the last digit refers to cylinder number), then you have found the culprit - bad spark plug. If the code reappeared with P0302 (Cylinder #2 again), then swap out the spark plug wire (both ends). Clear the code. Start and run for a couple of minutes. Again, if it appears on Cylinder #3 - the plug wire is the culprit. If the P0302 code comes back, swap the coil. See where this is going?

Now, when you first pulled the plug from Cylinder #2, if it wasn't wet or smelled of fuel, chances are Spark is not the issue. Was the plug dry and/or ashy? Possible cause is no fuel reaching the combustion chamber (cylinder). Using an automotive stethoscope, listen to the fuel injector for cylinder #2 while the motor is running. Should hear a regular and rhythmic ticking sound. Like a fast clock. (Use a long handled screwdriver touching one end to your ear and the other to the top of the injector if you dont have a stethoscope). No clicking or irregular clicking means fuel injector is not working (no sound) or is not working properly. Like searching for the Spark problem, swap the injector in #2 cylinder with #3. Clear code. Start and run. If the problem moved to #3, ithat injector is the culprit. If it stayed on #2, it is likely your wiring to that injector - check the whole harness for loose connections or swelled with oil wires/connectors. Keep pecking away at the fuel delivery system for that cylinder. Stay looking for things that affect only that cylinder.

When you pulled the plug, was it fairly normal looking? Then this misfire code might only be a timing problem. It is likely not a timing problem in your case, because timing affects all cylinders, but I thought I would just mention it since Timing is an important part of combustion. Also, if timing were a culprit here, another code would usually appear signifying the Camshaft Positon Sensor or Crankshaft Position Sensor was/is failed, or it is possible for the timing belt/chain to skip a knurl on a sproket and throw the timing off, but like I said, it would almost always cause multiple/random (Code P0300) misfires.

And finally, when you pulled the plug earlier, if it was an oily sticky mess, then the culprit might be Air - or compression/lack of compression. Lets hope not, because when Air is the cause of a misfire, it is usually an expensive fix. Need to perform a compression test. If you have little or no compression in the cylinder, it is likely a bad head gasket or a stuck/sticky/broken/chipped valve (exhaust or intake). Any of these things are bad news and expensive to fix in a shop. Also bad news and time consuming and difficult task for a shade tree mechanic.

Now, clear that code and get started! Good luck!

Feb 10, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

I have a 2005 sienna with 100,00 miles i got hit with multi misfire codes. I changed spark plugs but now i have error P0305 cylinder #5 misfire. i swapped out coils to see if the misfires moves but no...


With a misfire...its usually plugs, plug wires, and coil packs.
Sounds like you've done this...so, make sure plug wire is seated real well at each end.
(its usually the connection points that get corroded or dirty...or a crack in the wire insulation allows the spark to shoot to the nearest ground.)

I have seen the plugs get fouled out by water entering the cylinder...rare, but happens.

Hope this helps...

Aug 28, 2011 | 2004 Toyota Sienna

1 Answer

PO672 CYLINDER 2 GLOW PLUG CIRCUIT, THIS IS WHAT THE COMPUTER ERROR CODE SHOWS. WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?


If you have replaced the glow plugs....replace glow plug harness. If code reappears, replace glow plug controller.

FYI: VW numbers the glow plugs backwards. IE: #1 cylinder next to the timing belt cover is number #4 glow plug...so your #2 is actually #3 on the engine.

Dec 20, 2010 | 2002 Volkswagen Beetle Turbo S

1 Answer

1992 F250 7.3 idi diesel glow plug relay has power to two large posts and one small post and the second small post pulses when activated. I checked ground to engine and seems to be gounded fine. Any ideas...


Have you checked the glow-plugs? On that system if one glow-plug is burnt up than it will not let the main relay in the controller to kick in.
Check all the glow-plugs make sure they are working.
The easiest way to check them is with a regular 12v test light.
Hook up the negitive end (aligator clip end ) to the battery + terminal and than with the other end of the test light ( pointed end ) touch each glow- plug connector tip ( with the glow-plugs harness connector removed ) and see if the test light lights up.
If the test light up--- glow-plug is good. If not than the glow-plug is bad--burnt out .

Feb 13, 2010 | 1992 Ford F250

3 Answers

What is the obd 2 code 0674


sorry. i didn't see the heading. According to what i've seen about this code, you own a diesel. further more it appears to be a glow plug circuit code which also indicates cylinder #4.

Nov 02, 2009 | 2005 Dodge Sprinter 3500 Standard Roof

2 Answers

I have a 1997 ford F350 WITH A 7.3L DIESEL, it turns over but will not start. My wail to start light or other indicator lights do not come on when I turn on the key.


The first thing to do is locate the owner manual.

Look for the glow plug relay MAIN FUSE location.

The glow plug portion of your van is not working.

This difficulty scale from 1 to 10 is a 9.

You will need a DVM and tool undo the cables to each glow plugs.

It's a 1 to 2 hours troubleshooting job.

I'm going to fire off a quick list

====
Check / replace blown glow plug relay main fuse
====

Disconnect each center nut of the glow plug wire. PLEASE CHECK ONE AT A TIME.

Read the resistance between the center of the glow plug and the metal base of the plug.

Please take good note on each glow plug resistance reading.

MAKE SURE all cables are put back and tighten properly.

Compare the resistance on all cylinders.

OPEN/high resistance is bad glow plug.

In general 3 ohm or less is OK.

You should buy one and use its value as baseline.

===

Glow plug relay can be bad.

You will need the VOM and a friend to turn the key.

Check the voltage to each glow plugs. It should be 12.6-13.6 volt.

Be careful,the plugs will get HOT.

Compare the voltage on each cylinders.

====
So the problem can be combination of

glow plug relay

glow plug relay main fuse

glow plugs

ignition switch is unlikely but I'm going to list it anyway.

Once again,this is a difficult and time consuming job. I will ask a friend to help out,

Good luck.


Jul 23, 2009 | Ford F-350 Cars & Trucks

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