Question about 1998 Dodge Neon

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Bar in trunk

The pitman rod would be in the trunk???? its front wheel drive

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Do you mean pitman arm. Yes neons steer with the front wheels. All production Neons have Rack and Pinion steering. If it is a pitman arm that is an older steering system found on older cars and large trucks and bigger SUV's.

Posted on Nov 17, 2008

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How many lubrication fittings are there on a 1999 Buick LaSabre?


if this has a conventional front end(not front wheel drive) then there will be one on each outer tie rod end one on each inner tie rod end, both upper and lower ball joints on each side, idler arm and pitman arm. if its front wheel drive it will have a rack and pinion steering. there for there will be one on each outer tie rod end and one on each lower ball joint, if they have grease fittings. so conventional steering has 10 fittings total and rack and pinion has 4 total.

Jul 28, 2015 | Buick Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Shaking issue when accelerating- 2004 dodge dakota have replaced transmission mount, flushed transmission, and replaced sway bar


Check your universal joints, as well as your wheel bearings and play in your front wheels. If your pitman arm, idler arm, or tie rods are worn the initial acceleration will cause a shaking feeling because the tires are wobbling.

The Universal joints are a big problem as well, and you should check them before its too late. If one breaks you can damage your drive shaft when it hits the road.....Let me know what you find.

Mar 07, 2011 | 2004 Dodge Dakota

1 Answer

STeering wheel is loose and noisy while steering. Sounds like something broke inside.


This might help to understand the steering linkage: REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Fig. 1: Steering linkage used on the Bronco and 4-wheel drive F-150 84928067.gif
Fig. 2: Steering linkage used on the 4-wheel drive F-350 84928070.gif
Fig. 3: Steering linkage used on F-Super Duty chassis/cab 84928071.gif
Pitman Arm EXCEPT F-SUPER DUTY STRIPPED CHASSIS AND MOTOR HOME CHASSIS
  1. Place the wheels in a straight-ahead position.
  2. Disconnect the drag link at the Pitman arm. You'll need a puller such as a tie rod end remover.
  3. Remove the Pitman arm-to-gear nut and washer.
  4. Matchmark the Pitman arm and gear housing for installation purposes.
  5. Using a 2-jawed puller, remove the Pitman arm from the gear.
  6. Installation is the reverse of removal. Align the matchmarks when installing the Pitman arm. Tighten the Pitman arm nut to 170-230 ft. lbs. (230-312 Nm); torque the drag link ball stud nut to 50-75 ft. lbs. (68-102 Nm), advancing the nut to align the cotter pin hole. Never back off the nut to align the hole.
F-SUPER DUTY STRIPPED CHASSIS MOTOR HOME CHASSIS
  1. Matchmark the Pitman arm and sector shaft.
  2. Disconnect the drag link from the Pitman arm.
  3. Remove the bolt and nut securing the Pitman arm to the sector shaft.
  4. Using a 2-jawed gear puller, remove the Pitman arm from the sector shaft. To install:
  5. Aligning the matchmarks, slide the Pitman arm onto the sector shaft. If the arm won't slide on easily, use a cold chisel to spread the separation. NEVER HAMMER THE ARM ONTO THE SHAFT! Hammering on the arm will damage the steering gear!
  6. Install the nut and bolt. Tighten the nut to 220-300 ft. lbs. (298-407 Nm).
  7. Connect the drag link.
Tie Rod and Drag Link EXCEPT RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE
  1. Place the wheels in a straight-ahead position.
  2. Remove the cotter pins and rust from the drag link and tie rod ball studs.
  3. Remove the drag link ball studs from the right-hand spindle and Pitman arm.
  4. Remove the tie rod ball studs from the left-hand spindle and drag link.
  5. Installation is the reverse of removal. Seat the studs in the tapered hole before tightening the nuts. This will avoid wrap-up of the rubber grommets during tightening of the nuts. Tighten the nuts to 70 ft. lbs. (95 Nm). Always use new cotter pins.
  6. Have the front end alignment checked.
RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE
  1. Raise and support the front end on jackstands.
  2. Place the wheels in the straight-ahead position.
  3. Remove the nuts connecting the drag link ball studs to the connecting rod and Pitman arm.
  4. Disconnect the drag link using a tie rod end remover.
  5. Loosen the bolts on the adjuster clamp. Count the number of turns it take to remove the drag link from the adjuster. To install:
  6. Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure. Install the drag link with the same number of turns it took to remove it. Make certain that the wheels remain in the straight-ahead position during installation. Seat the studs in the tapered hole before tightening the nuts. This will avoid wrap-up of the rubber grommets during tightening of the nuts. Tighten the adjuster clamp nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm). Tighten the ball stud nuts to 75 ft. lbs. (102 Nm).
  7. Have the front end alignment checked.
Connecting Rod RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE
  1. Raise and support the front end on jackstands.
  2. Place the wheels in the straight-ahead position.
  3. Disconnect the connecting rod from the drag link by removing the nut and separating the two with a tie rod end remover.
  4. Loosen the bolts on the adjusting sleeve clamps. Count the number of turns it takes to remove the connecting rod from the connecting rod from the adjuster sleeve and remove the rod.
  5. Installation is the reverse of removal. Install the connecting rod the exact number of turns noted during removal. Tighten the tie rod nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm); the ball stud nut to 75 ft. lbs. (102 Nm).
  6. Have the front end alignment checked.
Tie Rod Ends RUBBERIZED BALL SOCKET LINKAGE Fig. 4: Remove the cotter pin from the castellated nut at the ball stud 88288p02.jpg
Fig. 5: Remove the nut from the ball stud 88288p03.jpg
Fig. 6: Use a tie rod end puller tool to remove the ball stud from the Pitman arm 88288p04.jpg
Fig. 7: Liquid correction fluid makes excellent paint to mark the threads of the tie rod end 88288p05.jpg
Fig. 8: For a more accurate reinstallation, you may measure the tie rod end prior to removal 88288p06.jpg
Fig. 9: After having loosened the nut, unscrew and remove the tie rod end 88288p07.jpg
  1. Raise and support the front end on jackstands.
  2. Place the wheels in a straight-ahead position.
  3. Remove the ball stud from the Pitman arm using a tie rod end remover. NOTE: Optional: paint a mark or measure the length of the tie rod end threads to ease reinstallation in as close to the original position as possible.
  4. Loosen the nuts on the adjusting sleeve clamp. Remove the ball stud from the adjuster, or the adjuster from the tie rod. Count the number of turns it takes to remove the sleeve from the tie rod or ball stud from the sleeve. To install:
  5. Install the sleeve on the tie rod, or the ball in the sleeve the same number of turns noted during removal. Make sure that the adjuster clamps are in the correct position, illustrated, and torque the clamp bolts to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm).
  6. Keep the wheels facing straight-ahead and install the ball studs. Tighten the nuts to 75 ft. lbs. (102 Nm). Use new cotter pins.
  7. Install the drag link and connecting rod.
  8. Have the front end alignment checked.
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Sep 18, 2010 | 1996 Ford F150 Regular Cab

1 Answer

Is a special tool required to remove inner tie rod from relay rod on 2001 Tahoe.? Also what should torque be?


Relay Rod Removal & Installation To Remove:
  1. Raise and support the vehicle
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Engine protection shield, if equipped
    • Steering damper from the relay rod, if equipped Note: Use the proper tool in order to separate all the tie rods and the ball joints.
      Steering components gm_trk_sub15_steering_components.gif

    • Tie rod ends (F) (See: Tie Rod Ends)
    • Idler arm ball stud nut (J) and discard the nut (See: Idler Arm)
    • Pitman arm nut (H) and discard the nut (See: Pitman Arm) Remove the idler arm from the relay rod gm_trk_sub15_idler_from_relay_rod.gif

    • Relay rod from the idler arm ball stud using the J24319-B or other suitable puller Remove relay rod from pitman arm ball stud gm_trk_sub15_relay_rod_rem.gif

    • Relay rod from the pitman arm ball stud using the J24319-B or other suitable puller
    • Relay rod from the vehicle
  3. Inspect the threads on the tie rod ends for damage
  4. Inspect the ball stud threads for damage
  5. Inspect the ball stud seals for excessive damage
  6. Clean the threads on the ball studs
To Install:
  1. Install or connect the following:
    • Relay rod to the vehicle
    • Relay rod to the pitman arm ball stud
    • Relay rod to the idler arm ball stud and make sure the seal is on the stud
    • New pitman arm prevailing torque nut
    • New idler arm prevailing torque nut and tighten the idler arm and pitman arm nuts; Torque to: 46 ft. lbs. (62 Nm)
    • Tie rod ends
    • Steering dampener to the relay rod, if equipped
    • Engine protection shield, if equipped
  2. Lower the vehicle
  3. Check the wheel alignment
  4. Test drive the vehicle to confirm the repairs
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Sep 18, 2010 | 2001 Chevrolet Tahoe

1 Answer

I have a 2004 Chevy 2500 HD 4x4 with a Duramax. I recently replaced the ball joints, inner and outer tie rods, idler arm and pitman arm and the sway bar links. Now when you turn the wheel left or right the...


You are on the right track. You may have overtightened the tie rods or the sway bar links. Whenever you do this much front-end work, you should always get the front-end re-aligned. The front-end mechanic will probably find and fix this as a normal part of the re-alignment at no extra cost.

Feb 22, 2010 | 2004 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD

1 Answer

Front wheels shake when I hit a bump in road


Pitman arm and tie rod ends and bail joints.The three main causes of front end shake after hitting a bump.There's so much slop that when you hit a bump it shakes violently from one end of the slop to the other.Very dangerous!You need to get this fixed now!
Get someone to turn the steering wheel while holding onto a front wheel and just watch for stuff that moves.Turn left and right and you'll see what's the worst for wear.The connections at the steering box arm(Pitman) and at the wheels(Tie rods) will be what moves the worst.Hope this helps?Autozone has a kit for the pitman for $100,probably be $600 at a shop.

Jan 11, 2010 | 1994 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2 Answers

I HAVE A 1998 GMC JIMMY 4X4 .. IT SEEMS AS THOUGH WHEN I PUT IT IN 4 WHEEL DRIVE IT PULLS ALL OVER THE ROAD . IT KINDA FEELS LIKE IM DRIVING AGAINST SOMEONE .. I HAD MY UPPER AND LOWER BALL JOINTS DONE AND...


inspect frt end tie rods,idler arm,pitman arm,inner tie rods,steeringbox,control arms upper and lower bushings.1or more of these parts could be worn

Feb 25, 2009 | 1998 GMC Jimmy

1 Answer

Bar in trunk


It is a Pitman bar, it is for steering.

Nov 11, 2008 | 1988 Ford F 150

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