Question about 1990 Ford F150

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Cant get any spark

Ive change the coil and the distributor pick up coil and the module on the side of the distributor

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You're not getting spark out of the ignition coil? Do you have power to the coil? What about ground? If you have spark from the coil to the distributer, but nothing coming out of the distributer, then check your cap and rotor.

Posted on Nov 24, 2008

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Cant get no fire/replaced distributor /cap and roter replaced crank sensor and coil put wires and plugs { and still cant get fire to distributor} 1996 gmc/1500 5.7liter


if i understand u correctly u replaced the distributor and cap if so i would start with making sure my pick up coil was installed correctlyand or replace it.i also would look at the possibility of it being a powertrain control module or neutral safety switch if this vehicle is equipt with one. hope ive been helpful

May 15, 2011 | 1996 GMC Sierra

1 Answer

Hi, I have a Ford F 150 5.0 pick- up truck. I cannot get a spark from the coil at all. What could the problem be?


Check for 12 volts at the coil with the key on. This system uses a hall effect pick-up which is located in the distributor. Along with this pick-up you have either a (TFI) thick film ignition module or a duraspark ignition module. If you have a TFI it will be mounted on the side of the distributor. A duraspark module will be mounted to the drivers side fender well. In most cases, the pick up in the distributor is the root cause. If you have a TFI module, the pick up and module are usually replaced as a pair. Good Luck.

Apr 07, 2011 | 1990 Ford F150

2 Answers

No spark from spark plug wires I think it may be the distributor cap or interior parts under cap like rotor and condensor but dont want to change parts thats are fine i replaced the plugs but still no...


There wrere two types of HEI (High Energy Ignition) distributors used by GM in 1985, one was the original design with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap, and the second had the coil mounted seperate from the distributor and used a coil wire.

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also if the coil is seperate from the distributor that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.


GM HEI Ignition Coil (Mounted In Distributor Cap Type)
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Jul 30, 2010 | 1985 Chevrolet Chevy

1 Answer

What would cause my car to not send spark to the spark plugs


The first thing is do you know when the last time was that the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires were changed?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require a firing order diagram any further assistance with testing or diagnostic procedures.




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Jul 29, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

I have a 91 f250 with 7.5 liter and no spark. where may the problem be?


Use a test light and check to see if there is battery voltage present at the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position if no battery voltage is present at the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position then there is a power supply or wiring problem to the ignition coil, and if there is battery voltage at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then with the test light on the "Neg" (-) or negative side of the ignition coil crank the engine over. The test light should flash or pulse indicating that there is a dwell signal to the ignition coil, and if there is battery voltage to the "Pos" side of the ignition coil and there is a dwell signal to the "Neg" side of the ignition coil, and there is still no spark from the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If there is battery voltage to the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, and there is no dwell signal to the "Neg" side of the ignition coil, then the Ignition module, or the pick-up coil/stator would be the most likely cause of the problem.

Check to see if that ignition system actually used an ignition module on the side of the distributor, and if the distributor does have an ignition module mounted on the side of it, then it is most likely faulty and those modules were prone to failure from excessive engine heat. Also, remove the distributor cap and inspect the connector from the pick-up coil/stator where the ignition module connects to it, and if the connector is dark or burnt looking then also replace the pick-up coil/stator or the entire distributor. You might need a Ford ignition module wrench to remove the ignition module from the side of the distributor and most auto part stores will have one for only a few dollars.

Here are some images to assist you and notice the white connector on the ignition pick-up coil/stator and when that connector turns dark or burnt looking then it is faulty.


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Jun 19, 2010 | 1991 Ford F250

2 Answers

No spark


There's no emergence switch, if there was it would only be for fuel and not spark, there four thing to get spark,
ignition control module, ignition coil, distributor pick up assembly and spark plug wire's check for spark at coil, more then likely it's going to be your distributor pick up assembly, the pick up sit in side your ignition distributor, replace it and it will start, hope this was very helpful.

May 19, 2010 | 1985 Ford F 250

1 Answer

How to change a pick up coil on a 1989 chevy 1500 350 5.7L


Have u changed out ur Ignition module ? Needle nose pliers to take off retainer clip.Detach negative battery terminal,remove Dist cap nd rotor. Detach pick up coil leads from module.

Oct 02, 2009 | 1989 Chevrolet C1500

1 Answer

No spark


okay! so did you consider changing the pick up module in side distributor cap! if it is not responding I really doubt any spark will come your way! hope this helped

Dec 28, 2008 | 1988 Jeep Cherokee

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