Question about 1986 Ford F 350

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Will go in all forward gears, but will not move in reverse.

Clutch is good, shift forks are good, no visual gear damage.

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  • Edward102756 Jan 07, 2009

    my 1986 ford ranger 2.9 engine will not move while it is in reverse what should i do?

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This might sound crazy, But make sure the rear brakes are releasing. I have seen instances where your e-brake will hold up and not allow the wheel to turn.

Posted on Jan 26, 2009

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VERY Bizarre Combination of "Symptoms" I Believe Relating to Clutch or Transmission, or heaven forbid worse! Please help!


Hi,

First, congrats on the most detailed problem description I have ever seen! Seriously, it does assist us.

All this is completely consistent with your clutch not releasing properly, meaning that the gearbox is still turning when the pedal is depressed. The syncros in the gearbox will then keep you out of gear, that is what they should do. You can indeed shift into higher gears however when driving as the gearbox revs more nearly match to what is needed. The jerking forward when you hit the starter is due to the poor old starter motor having to move the whole car instead of just the engine, because the clutch has not released !

Now as to why, it is likely that the clutch release fork has broken, inside the housing. I had this once with a Mazda, and symptoms were exactly as you describe. The gearbox has to be removed if this is the problem, and you should also then take the chance to renew the clutch, pressure and driven plate both, unless quite new.

Also a possible cause is a complete loss of clutch fluid if a hydraulic clutch, or a broken cable if that type of clutch. Loss of fluid in a hydraulic clutch can be easily checked in the fluid reservoir, and can occur if a hose splits
..

Jun 19, 2016 | 1995 Mazda Protege

2 Answers

Why will it not go into 5 gear,It will go in 1 thru 4 but when you let out on clutch, truck won move, it goes dead. Truck will roll in neutral ........ Thanks for any Help


Are you sure that you are selecting FIFTH or are you selecting REVERSE? A "smart" car will kill the engine if you shift into REVERSE while moving forward, to prevent you from breaking the transmission.

Feb 09, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Noise when shifting gears


transmission synchronizers most common cause of transmisson noise in certain gears, and not others, might want to check the gear oil level. Transmission rebuild required. To read about them and what they actually do, then here is a good read:
When you shift gears in your standard shift car, you move a rod that moves a fork that engages the gear. Depending which gear you're shifting to, a different fork does the job. The fork moves the collar to the desired gear, and dog teeth on the collar mesh up with holes on the gear in order to engage it. You engage reverse gear through a separate, small idler gear. The reverse gear always turns in the opposite direction of the other (forward) gears.
In years past, double-clutching was common in order to disengage a gear, allow the collar and next gear to reach the same speed, and then to engage the new gear. To double-clutch shift, you pushed the clutch pedal to free the engine from the transmission. Then the collar moved into neutral. You released the clutch and revved the engine to get it to the right rpm value for the next gear so the collar and the next gear spun at the same rate to allow the dog teeth to engage the gear. When the engine hit the right speed, you depressed the clutch again in order to lock the collar into place on the next gear.
Modern cars use synchronizers in order to avoid the need for double-clutching. A synchronizer, or "synchro," lets the collar and gear synchronize their speeds while they're already in contact but before the dog teeth engage. Each manufacturer's synchro is slightly different than the others, but the basic idea is the same. For instance, a cone on one gear will fit into a cone-shaped depression on the collar. The gear and collar synchronize their speeds thanks to the friction between the cone and collar. Then the outer part of the collar moves out of the way so that the gear can be engaged by the dog teeth.

Dec 16, 2013 | Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Obd11 code p-0751 trans has no reverse stuck in 2nd gear


If this is a manual (5 speed) - you may have a broken shift fork. You'll want to either replace just the shift fork, or (best) - purchase a clutch kit for the truck as well as the shift fork; the kit will come with everything you need to replace the clutch. It is not necessary to replace the clutch components, however it's best to while you're in there, that way you know everything is new and good. Otherwise, after pulling the transmission, and verifying that the shift fork is the issue, then replace the shift fork. (It's best here, to replace the throw-out bearing, (it attaches to the shift fork) as it is most likely damaged.
Please let me know if you need further assistance.
carsandcomps,
Guru, Premium Expert @ Fixya.com

Jan 20, 2011 | 1999 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

I have a '94 F150, straight 6, 4wd, 5 speed manual trans. My transmission shifting knob popped out of it's position and was stuck in a gear. I opened up the cover and was able to move the gear manually...


it seems like your shift fork is in between gears you must remove the shift tower and align all the shift levers then drop the shift knob into the middle being neutral tighten it up and it should be ok but remember the replacement could be slightly thinner then the original and causing this new problem.

Nov 13, 2010 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1986 Nissan Pickup


Shift fork may also be one of the reason! watch the shift fork while moving the clutch in and out.
1)The shift fork is near the clutch master cylinder on the tranmission housing. you should now move the fork left and right while the clutch is moved in and out. 2)From your query, it sounds to me that your clutch is not engaging and disengaging completely. 3) This is due to the air block. Make a bleeding process to blow the air out! 4)A broken shift fork will also prohibit the clutch from engaging/disengaging.

May 10, 2010 | 1986 Nissan Pickup 4WD 1986

1 Answer

Tranny trouble??


TRANSMISSION FLUIDS CAN BE CAUSED BY ONLY A COUPLE OF THINGS. MOST COMMON BEING A WORN OR BROKEN SEAL. THE TRANSMISSION SEALS ON MOST CARS ARE MADE FROM RUBBER OR METAL. BEING IN ALL KIND OF EXTREME TEMPS FOR YEARS ON END NOT TO MENTION THE PARTS MOVING AROUND THEM WILL EVENTUALLY CAUSE LEAKS. ALSO FAULTY INSTALLATION (OF A SEAL) CAN ALSO CAUSE A LEAK TO HAPPEN. THE ONLY OTHER THING THAT CAN CAUSE A LEAK TO MY KNOWLEGE WOULD BE IF YOU BOTTOMED OUT A CAR LOW ENOUGH THAT IT CAUSES DAMAGE TO THE TRANS CASE OR PAN. One cause of grinding when shifting into reverse is improper adjustment of the clutch linkage. If the adjustment is correct when the clutch is depressed the gears should stop turning and eliminate the grinding. Make sure there is some free play in the linkage when the clutch is not depressed. Most manual transmissions do not have a sychronized reverse gear. When you try to go into reverse from neutral, the transmission countershaft (which is linked to the pilot shaft) is still turning. The main shaft (which is linked to the tailshaft) is not turning. Therefore, since there is no sychronizer (or clutch brake like on a heavy truck tranny) the sliding cluctch gear (splined to the main shaft) grinds against the main shaft gear (floating over the main shaft but meshing its respecive countershaft gear through the reverse idler). The slider's function is to lock the main shaft gear to the main shaft thereby transmitting power to the rear wheels in the desired gear ratio (depending on which main shaft gear is locked to the main shaft). The way to cure this is to select a forward gear to stop the transmission and then go to reverse, all the while holding the clutch down. If it still won't go into gear you can either slip the clutch ever so slightly to "bump" the gears while gently pushing the stick into reverse (not too hard!! you can bend or break forks!! OUCH!!) or go into neutral, let the clutch all the way out, go into a forward gear and then reverse.

Feb 26, 2010 | 1999 GMC Suburban

1 Answer

My 2001 lincoln ls wont go into 4th or 5th gears. Took it to a trans shop and they recommended a rebuild for 3000+ dollars. But Ive been reading that alot of lincolns with the same problem getting err


call your dealer to get an estimate too.

Shift Patterns Upshifts
Transmission upshifting is controlled by the powertrain control module. The PCM receives inputs from various engine or vehicle sensors and driver demands to control shift scheduling, shift feel and torque converter clutch (TCC) operation.
The PCM has an adaptive learn strategy to electronically control the transmission which will automatically adjust the shift feel. When the battery has been disconnected, or a new battery installed certain transmission operating parameters may be lost. The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) must re-learn these parameters. During this learning process you may experience slightly firm shifts, delayed, or early shifts. This operation is considered normal and will not affect the function of the transmission. Normal operation will return once these parameters are stored by the PCM.
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Apply Components Band — Overdrive
For component location, refer to Disassembled Views in this section.
During 2nd and 5th gear operation, hydraulic pressure is applied to the overdrive servo.
  • This pressure causes the piston to move and apply force to the band.
  • This action causes the overdrive band to hold the overdrive drum.
  • This causes the overdrive sun gear to be held stationary through the adapter plate and the overdrive drum.
Band — Low/Reverse
For component location, refer to Disassembled Views in this section.
During 2nd gear operation, 1st gear operation and reverse, hydraulic pressure is applied to the low/reverse servo.
  • This pressure causes the servo to move and apply force to the low/reverse band.
  • This action causes the low/reverse brake drum to be held.
  • This action causes the low/reverse planetary assembly to be held stationary.
Band — Intermediate
For component location, refer to Disassembled Views in this section.
During 3rd gear operation, hydraulic pressure is applied to the intermediate servo.
  • This pressure causes the servo to move and apply force to the intermediate band.
  • This action causes the direct clutch drum to be held.
  • The intermediate band holds the intermediate brake and direct clutch drum to the case in 3rd gear.
  • This causes the input shell and forward sun gear to be held stationary.
Clutches — Direct
For component location, refer to Disassembled Views in this section.
The direct clutch is a multi-disc clutch made up of steel and friction plates.
  • The direct clutch is applied with hydraulic pressure and disengaged by return springs and the exhaust of the hydraulic pressure.
  • It is housed in the direct clutch drum.
  • During 4th, 5th, and reverse gear application, the direct clutch is applied transferring torque from the forward clutch cylinder to the direct clutch drum.
  • This action causes the forward sun gear to drive the pinions of the low/reverse planetary carrier.
Clutches — Forward
For component location, refer to Disassembled Views in this section.
The forward clutch is a multi-disc clutch made up of steel and friction plates.
  • The forward clutch is applied with hydraulic pressure and disengaged by return springs and the exhaust of the hydraulic pressure.
  • The forward clutch is applied in all forward gears.
  • When applied, the forward clutch provides a direct mechanical coupling between the center shaft and the forward ring gear and hub.
Clutches — Coast
For component location, refer to Disassembled Views in this section.
The coast clutch is a multi-disc clutch made up of steel and friction plates.
  • The coast clutch is applied with hydraulic pressure and disengaged by return springs and the exhaust of the hydraulic pressure.
  • The coast clutch is housed in the overdrive drum.
  • The coast clutch is applied when in 1st, 3rd, D4, and reverse positions.
  • When applied, the coast clutch locks the overdrive sun gear to the overdrive planetary carrier, thus preventing the one-way clutch from overrunning when the vehicle is coasting.
    • This allows the use of engine compression to help slow the vehicle and provide engine braking.
Clutches — Intermediate
For component location, refer to Disassembled Views in this section.
The intermediate clutch is a multi-disc stationary clutch made up of steel and friction plates which are in a module assembly that includes the cylinder and frictions.
  • Applied with hydraulic pressure.
  • Disengaged by a return spring and releasing of hydraulic pressure.
  • Hydraulic pressure is feed through a feed tube in the case worm trail.
  • Uses a bonded piston in an aluminum housing.
  • Applied in during a 2-3 shift event.
  • Transfers torque from the sun gear to the planetary carrier.
  • Torque transfer causes the one way clutch to engage and holds the sun gear from turning, delivering 3rd gear.
One-Way Clutch — Direct
For component location, refer to Disassembled Views in this section.
The direct one-way clutch is a sprag-type one-way clutch that is pressed into the center shaft.
  • The direct one-way clutch is driven by the ring gear of the overdrive planetary carrier.
  • The direct one-way clutch holds and drives the outer splines of the center shaft in 1st, 3rd, 4th and reverse gears.
  • The direct one-way clutch overruns during all coast operations and at all times in 2nd and 5th gear.
One-Way Clutch — Intermediate
For component location, refer to Disassembled Views in this section.
The Intermediate One-Way Clutch is a sprag type one-way clutch.
  • The Intermediate One-Way Clutch connects the intermediate assembly to the input shell and sun gear assembly in third gear.
One-Way Clutch — Low/Reverse
For component location, refer to Disassembled Views in this section.
The low/reverse one-way clutch is a sprag type one-way clutch.
  • The low/reverse one-way clutch holds the low/reverse drum and low/reverse planetary assembly to the case in 1st and 2nd gear.
  • In all other gears the low/reverse one-way clutch overruns.
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May 01, 2009 | 2002 Lincoln LS

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