Question about 1997 Ford Probe

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Excesive lifter noise, do i need oil pump?

Hi,I have a '97 Ford Probe with a 2.0L DOHC16 valve engine. I just replaced the water pump, timing belt, and head gasket in my car; while I was having my head resurfaced. Every thing was fine for a few minutes, then there was extreme lifter noise, and now there is a slight howling in the cylinders, and it keeps wanting to stall out. I think it may be the oil pump, but it was fine before. The gauge shows good oil PSI, and the check engine light is off for the first time, so I'm trying to think of what to do now. Does anyone have any ideas how I could check

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Try a compression test to determine wether the cam timing is right in respect of its ability to complete a decent compression /ignition cycle as it sounds more like a timing issue than an oil pump.Also double check valve clearances.It sounds like the problem has only occured since changing the parts you mentioned so would have to believe one of the parts or reassembly was to blame and not the oil pump.

Posted on Oct 28, 2008

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Loud popping noise


Hi there Sara:
First check this information about "engine noses"...

ENGINE CLICKING NOISES
A clicking or tapping noise that gets louder when you rev the engine is probably "tappet" or upper valvetrain noise caused by one of several things: low oil pressure, excessive valve lash, or worn or damaged parts.

First, check the engine dipstick to see if the oil level is low. If low, add oil to bring it back up to the full mark. Is the engine still noisy? Check your oil pressure. A low gauge reading (or oil warning light) would indicate a serious internal engine problem that is preventing normal oil pressure from reaching the upper valvetrain components. The cause might be a worn or damaged oil pump, a clogged oil pump pickup screen or a plugged up oil filter. Using too thick a viscosity of motor oil during cold weather can also slow down the flow of oil to the upper valvetrain, causing noise and wear.

COLLAPSED LIFTER NOISE
Worn, leaky or dirty lifters can also cause valvetrain noise. If oil delivery is restricted to the lifters (plugged oil galley or low oil pressure), the lifters won't "pump up" to take up the normal slack in the valvetrain. A "collapsed" lifter will then allow excessive valve lash and noise.

VALVE LASH NOISE
If you can rule out lubrication-related problems as a cause, the next step would be to remove the valve cover(s) and check valve lash. On older import engines, mechanical lifters require periodic valve lash adjustments (typically every 30,000 miles). Too much space between the tips of the rocker arms and valve stems can make the valvetrain noisy -- and possibly cause accelerated wear of both parts.

To measure (and adjust) valve lash, you need a feeler gauge. The gauge is slid between the tip of the valve stem and rocker arm (or the cam follower or the cam itself on overhead cam engines) when the piston is at top dead center (valve fully closed). Refer to a manual for the specified lash and adjustment procedure. Also, note whether the lash spec is for a hot or cold engine (this makes a big difference!).

On engines with hydraulic lifters, oil pressure pumps up the lifters when the engine is running to maintain zero lash in the valvetrain. This results in quiet operation. So if the rocker arms are clattering, it tells you something is amiss (bad lifter or worn or damaged parts) or the rocker arms need adjusting.

DAMAGED ENGINE PARTS NOISE
Inspect the valvetrain components. Excessive wear on the ends of the rocker arms, cam followers (overhead cam engines) and/or valve stems can open up the valve lash and cause noise. So too can a bent pushrod or a broken valve spring.

RAPPING OR DEEP KNOCKING ENGINE SOUND
Usually bad news. A deep rapping noise from the engine is usually "rod knock," a condition brought on by extreme bearing wear or damage. If the rod bearings are worn or loose enough to make a dull, hammering noise, you're driving on borrowed time. Sooner or later one of the bearings will fail, and when it does one of two things will happen: the bearing will seize and lock up the engine, or it will attempt to seize and break a rod. Either way your engine will suffer major damage and have to be rebuilt or replaced.

Bearing noise is not unusual in high mileage engines as well as those that have been neglected and have not had the oil and filter changed regularly. It can also be caused by low oil pressure, using too light a viscosity oil, oil breakdown, dirty oil or dirt in the crankcase, excessive blowby from worn rings and/or cylinders (gasoline dilutes and thins the oil), incorrect engine assembly (bearings too loose), loose or broken connecting rod bolts, or abusive driving.

Bearing wear can be checked by dropping the oil pan and inspecting the rod and main bearings. If the bearings are badly worn, damaged or loose, replacing the bearings may buy you some time. But if the bearings are badly worn or damaged, the crankshaft will probably have to be resurfaced - which means a complete engine overhaul or replacing the engine is the vehicle is worth the expense.

ENGINE PINGS OR KNOCKS WHEN ACCELERATING
The cause here may be Spark Knock (Detonation) caused by an inoperative EGR valve, overadvanced ignition timing, engine overheating, carbon buildup in the combustion chambers, or low octane fuel.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jul 21, 2012 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Knocking when cold starts


Hi there:
Before to thnik isn some replacement, I suggest to check this information about "engine noses"...
ENGINE CLICKING NOISES
A clicking or tapping noise that gets louder when you rev the engine is probably "tappet" or upper valvetrain noise caused by one of several things: low oil pressure, excessive valve lash, or worn or damaged parts.

First, check the engine dipstick to see if the oil level is low. If low, add oil to bring it back up to the full mark. Is the engine still noisy? Check your oil pressure. A low gauge reading (or oil warning light) would indicate a serious internal engine problem that is preventing normal oil pressure from reaching the upper valvetrain components. The cause might be a worn or damaged oil pump, a clogged oil pump pickup screen or a plugged up oil filter. Using too thick a viscosity of motor oil during cold weather can also slow down the flow of oil to the upper valvetrain, causing noise and wear.

COLLAPSED LIFTER NOISE
Worn, leaky or dirty lifters can also cause valvetrain noise. If oil delivery is restricted to the lifters (plugged oil galley or low oil pressure), the lifters won't "pump up" to take up the normal slack in the valvetrain. A "collapsed" lifter will then allow excessive valve lash and noise.

VALVE LASH NOISE
If you can rule out lubrication-related problems as a cause, the next step would be to remove the valve cover(s) and check valve lash. On older import engines, mechanical lifters require periodic valve lash adjustments (typically every 30,000 miles). Too much space between the tips of the rocker arms and valve stems can make the valvetrain noisy -- and possibly cause accelerated wear of both parts.

To measure (and adjust) valve lash, you need a feeler gauge. The gauge is slid between the tip of the valve stem and rocker arm (or the cam follower or the cam itself on overhead cam engines) when the piston is at top dead center (valve fully closed). Refer to a manual for the specified lash and adjustment procedure. Also, note whether the lash spec is for a hot or cold engine (this makes a big difference!).

On engines with hydraulic lifters, oil pressure pumps up the lifters when the engine is running to maintain zero lash in the valvetrain. This results in quiet operation. So if the rocker arms are clattering, it tells you something is amiss (bad lifter or worn or damaged parts) or the rocker arms need adjusting.

DAMAGED ENGINE PARTS NOISE
Inspect the valvetrain components. Excessive wear on the ends of the rocker arms, cam followers (overhead cam engines) and/or valve stems can open up the valve lash and cause noise. So too can a bent pushrod or a broken valve spring.

RAPPING OR DEEP KNOCKING ENGINE SOUND
Usually bad news. A deep rapping noise from the engine is usually "rod knock," a condition brought on by extreme bearing wear or damage. If the rod bearings are worn or loose enough to make a dull, hammering noise, you're driving on borrowed time. Sooner or later one of the bearings will fail, and when it does one of two things will happen: the bearing will seize and lock up the engine, or it will attempt to seize and break a rod. Either way your engine will suffer major damage and have to be rebuilt or replaced.

Bearing noise is not unusual in high mileage engines as well as those that have been neglected and have not had the oil and filter changed regularly. It can also be caused by low oil pressure, using too light a viscosity oil, oil breakdown, dirty oil or dirt in the crankcase, excessive blowby from worn rings and/or cylinders (gasoline dilutes and thins the oil), incorrect engine assembly (bearings too loose), loose or broken connecting rod bolts, or abusive driving.

Bearing wear can be checked by dropping the oil pan and inspecting the rod and main bearings. If the bearings are badly worn, damaged or loose, replacing the bearings may buy you some time. But if the bearings are badly worn or damaged, the crankshaft will probably have to be resurfaced - which means a complete engine overhaul or replacing the engine is the vehicle is worth the expense.

ENGINE PINGS OR KNOCKS WHEN ACCELERATING
The cause here may be Spark Knock (Detonation) caused by an inoperative EGR valve, overadvanced ignition timing, engine overheating, carbon buildup in the combustion chambers, or low octane fuel.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Jun 27, 2012 | 1999 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

Ticking noise from under my hood


ticking noise can be a lifter /push rod /or rocker that needs adjusting or has been damaged from overheating [oil turns to sludge and can block oil passages in upper valve train ]or damaged from being out of time bent pushrod,flattened -collapsed lifter

Feb 09, 2012 | 2000 Chrysler 300M

1 Answer

Golf e mk4 is noisey sounds like tappets, but various mechanics reckon that it is hydraulic cylinder shims? car has done 66k and not been looked after, just had it serviced and still noisey. it needs a...


BAD LIFTERS WILL MAKE A NOISE.IF VALVE LIFTERS AND LOWER SPRING SEALS BEEN REPLACED AND LIFTERS STILL NOISEY.EITHER ENGINE OIL TOO THICK OR ENGINE NEED OIL CHANGE + FILTER CHANGE.DIRTY OIL CAUSE LIFTER NOISE OR OIL PASSAGES IN THE CYLINDER HEAD STOPPED UP NOT ALLOWING LIFTERS TO GET THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF OIL.OR OIL PRESSURE TO LOW DUE TO FAULTY OIL PUMP.OIL PRESSURE SHOULD BE 29 PSI @2000 RPM. TRYING ADDING SOME SEAFOAM CLEANER IN CRANK CASE IF OIL PASSAGES STOPPED UP IT WILL CLEAN OUT OIL SLUDGE.GO TO AUTO PARTS STORE TELL THEM YOU NEED SEAFOAM.AFTER 500 MILES YOU NEED TO CHANGE OIL AND FILTER AGAIN. SEE IF THIS HELP BEFORE SPENDING ALOT OF MONEY .

Oct 30, 2010 | Volkswagen Golf Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

My jeep is making a very loud tic noise coming from the motor...does this mean my motor is gone? How much am I looking at fixing this problem


ticking can be a few problems that are not terminal first check oil if low top off and see if noise quiets down if oil good than have oil pressure checked -may be clogging or bad oil pump-check check where the ticking is coming from if its the head area than possible need to clean repair or replace a valve train part-[clogged push rod ,bad/need adjustment rocker sticking /bent valve oil return clogging /sludge] if coming from front of engine check the pulleys and water pump or fan for damage or debris a ticking noise usually is a noise that can be repaired just need to pinpoint the location

Jul 10, 2010 | 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

My blazer is making a ticking noise. I have changed the belt,pulley, and recently the water pump. It now only makes the noise when I give it gas.What could be the problem?


can be anything if coming from upper engine possible problem in head[s] valve tick if truck overheated and oil wasnt changed also may have sludge in engine causing limited oiling of valves,lifters rockers or a valve needs adjusting rocker loose can also be from the parts u replaced need to listen to where noise is coming from

Feb 08, 2010 | 2000 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

Ticking sound in the engine


-usually a valve tick- check oil level,oil pressure--if due for oil change flush engine sludge may be hindering oil flow thru head area--other reasons oil pressure bad, head oil starved --lifter damaged or collapsed--rocker out of adjustment, bent valve/push rod==waterpump noise/ bearing /a worn or frayed belt --

Feb 01, 2010 | 1995 Ford Probe

4 Answers

TAPPING IN VALVES


ENGINE CLICKING NOISES
A clicking or tapping noise that gets louder when you rev the engine is probably "tappet" or upper valvetrain noise caused by one of several things: low oil pressure, excessive valve lash, or worn or damaged parts.
First, check the engine dipstick to see if the oil level is low. If low, add oil to bring it back up to the full mark. Is the engine still noisy? Check your oil pressure. A low gauge reading (or oil warning light) would indicate a serious internal engine problem that is preventing normal oil pressure from reaching the upper valvetrain components. The cause might be a worn or damaged oil pump, a clogged oil pump pickup screen or a plugged up oil filter. Using too thick a viscosity of motor oil during cold weather can also slow down the flow of oil to the upper valvetrain, causing noise and wear.
COLLAPSED LIFTER NOISE
Worn, leaky or dirty lifters can also cause valvetrain noise. If oil delivery is restricted to the lifters (plugged oil galley or low oil pressure), the lifters won't "pump up" to take up the normal slack in the valvetrain. A "collapsed" lifter will then allow excessive valve lash and noise.
VALVE LASH NOISE
If you can rule out lubrication-related problems as a cause, the next step would be to remove the valve cover(s) and check valve lash. On older import engines, mechanical lifters require periodic valve lash adjustments (typically every 30,000 miles). Too much space between the tips of the rocker arms and valve stems can make the valvetrain noisy -- and possibly cause accelerated wear of both parts.
To measure (and adjust) valve lash, you need a feeler gauge. The gauge is slid between the tip of the valve stem and rocker arm (or the cam follower or the cam itself on overhead cam engines) when the piston is at top dead center (valve fully closed). Refer to a manual for the specified lash and adjustment procedure. Also, note whether the lash spec is for a hot or cold engine (this makes a big difference!).
On engines with hydraulic lifters, oil pressure pumps up the lifters when the engine is running to maintain zero lash in the valvetrain. This results in quiet operation. So if the rocker arms are clattering, it tells you something is amiss (bad lifter or worn or damaged parts) or the rocker arms need adjusting.

Let me know if you have any other questions.  Thanks for rating my response and for using FixYa!

May 28, 2009 | 1997 Ford Expedition

4 Answers

97 explorer engine taps


what this sounds like is that your engine is starving for oil and the tapping noise is yuour rocker arms. this could be due to sludge build up on the intake screen of your oil pump or the pump itself is weak and no longer is providing the needed oil pressure. another place for sludge to build up is the valve covers and until the engine heats up very little oil is circulating to the push rod,rocker arms, and lifters. my suggestion is to clean the valve covers, drop the oil pan and remove the pump to look at the gears to see if there are missing teeth. also clean the screen of the pick up tube. replace the oil filter and put in new oil also use lucas additive this will do a good job of keeping the sludge build up to almost nill. if the problem persists then i would say that one or more of your hydraulic liftyers is weak and then they will need replacing.

May 13, 2009 | 1997 Ford Explorer AWD

3 Answers

Overheating and now engine 'clicking noises.


possible causes of overheating are, dirty cooling system, clogged radiator, bad thermostat. Use only distilled water with a good quality coolant.

still overheating? have your top head checked - warped head, valves, valve seats, etc. You might need to have your engine's compression checked if it is still within specs.

Sep 24, 2008 | 1995 Jeep Cherokee

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