Question about 2003 Volkswagen Passat

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Rear tires wearing out on inside. Wheels lean in so tires run on inside of tires. What needs to be repaired?

Tires wear out quickly

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 110 Answers

SOURCE: 98 VW Passat

You can switch sides ONLY because the tires will still rotate in the same direction they used to, now if you can get the tire store to do this is a different question.   You CANNOT safely change the direction that a radial tire spins once it's been driven for any length of time.  
You have bent or worn out components in the read suspension, or at the least need a 4 wheel alignment.  When you get a 4 wheel alignment, they will be able to tell if it is just  an adjustment or unseen damage.  If they says it's damaged due to the accident, get them to put it in writing and go back to your insurance company and tell them the adjuster didn't catch this damage and get them to pay for the fix.  I mean by gosh, you pay them enough in premiums and they are responsible if you had collision coverage.

Posted on Nov 01, 2008

  • 266 Answers

SOURCE: 2003 jetta the rear tires

If the proper alignment was set,the only thing that could be an issue would be the tire pressure. I would put 35 pounds of air ,in the tires and see if that might help. Also try to lighten the load on the rear of the car. Clean out the trunk ,ect,.. If that doesnt help ,maybe the rear shock absorbers are weak and need replaced. You can test by bouncing the rear of the car and it should only bounce one time. Even have a freind help bounce the car hard and it still should return back .Let me know if that helps

Posted on Mar 27, 2011

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If you have run out of adjustment, perhaps you should consider replacing the bars. Essentially they are just a different kind of spring and over time they do loose tension. Obviously something is affecting your alignment or the tires would not wear!
What I fail to understand is that a shop can tell you it's not mis-aligned if the wheels have an obvious camber problem??!! Has anyone put it on an alignment machine?

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