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5.4 ford f150 timing chain slop

I had a knocking noise coming from my 5.4 and after i checked all mains and rod bearings i found that the pasenger side timing chain is slaping the plastic guide can anyone help me with the fix

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
  • 2,002 Answers

The only fix I know is to replace the chain and gears. There isn't any adjustment for wear. Hope this helps.

Posted on Feb 21, 2012

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6 Suggested Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 30 Answers

SOURCE: Rod bearing knocking

These procedures may be performed with the engine in the car. If additional overhaul work is to be performed, it will be easier if the engine is removed and mounted on an engine stand. Most stands allow the block to be rotated, giving easy access to both the top and bottom. These procedures require certain hand tools which may not be in your tool box. A cylinder ridge reamer, a numbered punch set, piston ring expander, snapring tools and piston installation tool (ring compressor) are all necessary for correct piston and rod repair. These tools are commonly available from retail tool suppliers; you may be able to rent them from larger automotive supply houses.

  • Remove the cylinder head.Elevate and safely support the vehicle on jackstands.
  • Drain the engine oil.
    Remove any splash shield or rock guards which are in the way and remove the oil pan.
    Using a numbered punch set, mark the cylinder number on each piston rod and bearing cap. Do this BEFORE loosening any bolts.
    Loosen and remove the rod cap nuts and the rod caps. It will probably be necessary to tap the caps loose; do so with a small plastic mallet or other soft-faced tool. Keep the bearing insert with the cap when it is removed.
    Use short pieces of hose to cover the bolt threads; this protects the bolt, the crankshaft and the cylinder walls during removal.
    One piston will be at the lowest point in its cylinder. Cover the top of this piston with a rag. Examine the top area of the cylinder with your fingers, looking for a noticeable ridge around the cylinder. If any ridge is felt, it must be carefully removed by using the ridge reamer. Work with extreme care to avoid cutting too deeply.When the ridge is removed, carefully remove the rag and ALL the shavings from the cylinder. No metal cuttings may remain in the cylinder or the wall will be damaged when the piston is removed. A small magnet or an oil soaked rag can be helpful in removing the fine shavings.
    After the cylinder is de-ridged, squirt a liberal coating of engine oil onto the cylinder walls until evenly coated. Carefully push the piston and rod assembly upwards from the bottom by using a wooden hammer handle on the bottom of the connecting rod.
    The next lowest piston should be gently pushed downwards from above. This will cause the crankshaft to turn and relocate the other pistons as well. When the piston is in its lowest position, repeat the steps used for the first piston. Repeat the procedure for each of the remaining pistons.
    When all the pistons are removed, clean the block and cylinder walls thoroughly with solvent.

Posted on Sep 30, 2008

  • 218 Answers

SOURCE: '93 Chev Suburban engine knock, sounds like rod

MAKE SURE THE CRANKSHAFT IS NO DAMAGED.IF IT IS THE NEW BEARINGS WILL GO BAD QUICKLY

Posted on May 06, 2009

gladys_neal
  • 334 Answers

SOURCE: How difficult is it to install rod and main

in car service is not an option......a rebuild or a used engine are your only options or a new car......

Posted on Nov 16, 2009

  • 12650 Answers

SOURCE: i have a rod besring knocking on my 1987 toyota

no-sorry to tell u but need to pull engine to access crank shaft have to drop oil pan and u have to break down engine to block[ rod bearing might be part of problem wrist pin also may be damaged even side wall of cylinder may be damaged ] piston and rod go in from top of cylinder

Posted on Apr 08, 2010

TDISLine
  • 1874 Answers

SOURCE: I was told I have

1. For find out which rod bearing is out of order you need to use an engine stethoscope.
2. You can replace the bad rod bearing with the engine in the car, by removing the oil pan and the cylinder head. I strongly recommend you to replace all rod bearings of the engine, (one complete kit).

Posted on Oct 12, 2010

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1 Answer

It has a 351 Windsor motor in it. I has a terrible knocking sound. We replaced the main bearing and timing chain. What could it be?


How were the rod bearings? I always check them whenever replacing the main bearings. Why did you only say "main bearing"? There are always more than one.

could also be part of the fuel pump dropping do into the oil pan is now hitting the crank, but you checked the oil pan for "bits and pieces" when you took it off to change the main bearing - right?

Mar 31, 2015 | 1970 Ford Mustang

2 Answers

Kia sorento 2012 produce sound look like power steering problem and it gets louder when ever I acceleration gear, so I took belt out and start the engin with no belt I found that sound was in engin!!


If its a knocking sound:

A KNOCKING SOUND IN THE ENGINE IS MOST LIKELY CAUSED BY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
1. PISTON SLAP: Makes a sharp metallic noise. Idle engine and short out each cylinder plug. The noise will disappear when plug with bad piston is shorted. Noise will also disappear at acceleration. This can be caused by worn or out of round cylinder, or broken piston ring. Correct problem by re-boring cylinder and/or replacing piston.
2. VALVE NOISE: Makes clicking or rattle noise. Caused by excessive wear on valve stem or lifter, out of adjustment, or stuck valve. Correct by adjusting valve clearance, replace worn valve or lifter, regrind cam, replace valve guide and /or valve. A stuck valve can sometimes be loosened by passing oil through the carburetor while engine is running.

3. ROD BEARING KNOCK: Makes sharp metallic noise similar to a piston slap. Detection is opposite of piston slap. Rod knock is not heard at idle. Knock becomes louder as engine speed is increased. Caused by excessive rod bearing clearance. Correct by adjusting rod bearing clearance to .0015 inches by removing shims. May require re-pouring rod bearing.
4. REAR MAIN BEARING KNOCK: Makes dull knocking or thud noise. Detected at speeds between 20 and 50 MPH. Knock will normally decrease or disappear while pulling or decelerating. Noise will be detected the loudest at normal driving speed, when not pulling or decelerating. Correct by adjusting bearing clearance to .001 to .0015 inches. If knock is excessive, crank should be checked for out of roundness. May need to re-pour all main bearings to correct.
5. TIMING GEAR KNOCK: usually the most difficult to diagnose. If gear is loose or badly worn it will knock in all ranges. Run engine slightly above idle speed. Slowly open and close throttle. Knock will continue to be present, but just as engine slows down knock will become a slight rattle. Remove timing pin and reinsert into timing hole on timing gear cover. Press timing pin tightly against timing gear and accelerate slightly above idle. Knock will significantly be reduced or disappear. Correct by replacing both timing gear and crank gear as a matched set. The two gears should have a backlash clearance of .003 to .004. If more than .009 inch backlash, an oversize (.005) timing gear should be installed.
6. WRIST PIN SLAP: This can not be detected by shorting out the cylinder plugs. Rapidly accelerate and decelerate the engine speed. The engine will pass through a certain speed range when the wrist pin will rattle at about the same pitch as a valve tappet noise. This can be corrected by installing a new wrist pin bushing in the rod or new wrist pin f badly worn. Wrist pin should fit the piston and connecting rod with a tight metal to metal fit. The pin can be pushed into the piston and rod with a slight pressure of the hand. Pin to rod clearance is .0003 to .0005 inches.

Dec 15, 2013 | Kia Sorento Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 2004 chevy trailblazer is knocking


could be a big end or main bearing but there are a few simple checks that can be done first
1--have the oil pressure checked using a mechanical gauge
if there is a bad bearing there will be low pressure at idle
2 --check the exhaust for smoke under load
if there is a bad bearing , the escaping oil will overload the oil ring and produce smoke
( if smoke comes after idling at lights and on taking off that is valve stem seals)
3--- run the fault codes and check for knock sensor problems
the noise could be detonation under load from lean fuel mixture or incorrect timing
4---check the ignition timing
5-- run the engine when it is knocking and remove a plug wire and see if the knocking stops
bearings will stop knocking if there is no combustion to place load on the crankshaft
That will also indicate which big end you have to check if you have to pull the sump
Too far advanced will cause the pistons to slap the cylinder walls hard for too far advanced ignition
you statement that the noise goes after 40 indicates that it is not a bearing as the high the rpm the louder the noise
taking the foot off the pedal indicates detonation
lastly if all the checks prove good , you could always have the sump removed and check each big end and main individually for damage
sometimes a failing cam chain if fitted ( no motor identified) will knock as the chain hits the timing cover

Jul 23, 2017 | 2004 Chevrolet TrailBlazer

1 Answer

Makes knocking noise that sound like something is loos banging only when jeep warms up and only in gear


TROUBLESHOOTING ENGINE NOISES
A KNOCKING SOUND IN THE ENGINE IS MOST LIKELY CAUSED BY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
1. PISTON SLAP: Makes a sharp metallic noise. Idle engine and short out each cylinder plug. The noise will disappear when plug with bad piston is shorted. Noise will also disappear at acceleration. This can be caused by worn or out of round cylinder, or broken piston ring. Correct problem by re-boring cylinder and/or replacing piston.
2. VALVE NOISE: Makes clicking or rattle noise. Caused by excessive wear on valve stem or lifter, out of adjustment, or stuck valve. Correct by adjusting valve clearance, replace worn valve or lifter, regrind cam, replace valve guide and /or valve. A stuck valve can sometimes be loosened by passing oil through the carburetor while engine is running.

3. ROD BEARING KNOCK: Makes sharp metallic noise similar to a piston slap. Detection is opposite of piston slap. Rod knock is not heard at idle. Knock becomes louder as engine speed is increased. Caused by excessive rod bearing clearance. Correct by adjusting rod bearing clearance to .0015 inches by removing shims. May require re-pouring rod bearing.
4. REAR MAIN BEARING KNOCK: Makes dull knocking or thud noise. Detected at speeds between 20 and 50 MPH. Knock will normally decrease or disappear while pulling or decelerating. Noise will be detected the loudest at normal driving speed, when not pulling or decelerating. Correct by adjusting bearing clearance to .001 to .0015 inches. If knock is excessive, crank should be checked for out of roundness. May need to re-pour all main bearings to correct.
5. TIMING GEAR KNOCK: usually the most difficult to diagnose. If gear is loose or badly worn it will knock in all ranges. Run engine slightly above idle speed. Slowly open and close throttle. Knock will continue to be present, but just as engine slows down knock will become a slight rattle. Remove timing pin and reinsert into timing hole on timing gear cover. Press timing pin tightly against timing gear and accelerate slightly above idle. Knock will significantly be reduced or disappear. Correct by replacing both timing gear and crank gear as a matched set. The two gears should have a backlash clearance of .003 to .004. If more than .009 inch backlash, an oversize (.005) timing gear should be installed.
6. WRIST PIN SLAP: This can not be detected by shorting out the cylinder plugs. Rapidly accelerate and decelerate the engine speed. The engine will pass through a certain speed range when the wrist pin will rattle at about the same pitch as a valve tappet noise. This can be corrected by installing a new wrist pin bushing in the rod or new wrist pin f badly worn. Wrist pin should fit the piston and connecting rod with a tight metal to metal fit. The pin can be pushed into the piston and rod with a slight pressure of the hand. Pin to rod clearance is .0003 to .0005 inches.

Dec 07, 2013 | Jeep Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Making knocking sound


A KNOCKING SOUND IN THE ENGINE IS MOST LIKELY CAUSED BY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
1. PISTON SLAP: Makes a sharp metallic noise. Idle engine and short out each cylinder plug. The noise will disappear when plug with bad piston is shorted. Noise will also disappear at acceleration. This can be caused by worn or out of round cylinder, or broken piston ring. Correct problem by re-boring cylinder and/or replacing piston.
2. VALVE NOISE: Makes clicking or rattle noise. Caused by excessive wear on valve stem or lifter, out of adjustment, or stuck valve. Correct by adjusting valve clearance, replace worn valve or lifter, regrind cam, replace valve guide and /or valve. A stuck valve can sometimes be loosened by passing oil through the carburetor while engine is running.

3. ROD BEARING KNOCK: Makes sharp metallic noise similar to a piston slap. Detection is opposite of piston slap. Rod knock is not heard at idle. Knock becomes louder as engine speed is increased. Caused by excessive rod bearing clearance. Correct by adjusting rod bearing clearance to .0015 inches by removing shims. May require re-pouring rod bearing.
4. REAR MAIN BEARING KNOCK: Makes dull knocking or thud noise. Detected at speeds between 20 and 50 MPH. Knock will normally decrease or disappear while pulling or decelerating. Noise will be detected the loudest at normal driving speed, when not pulling or decelerating. Correct by adjusting bearing clearance to .001 to .0015 inches. If knock is excessive, crank should be checked for out of roundness. May need to re-pour all main bearings to correct.
5. TIMING GEAR KNOCK: usually the most difficult to diagnose. If gear is loose or badly worn it will knock in all ranges. Run engine slightly above idle speed. Slowly open and close throttle. Knock will continue to be present, but just as engine slows down knock will become a slight rattle. Remove timing pin and reinsert into timing hole on timing gear cover. Press timing pin tightly against timing gear and accelerate slightly above idle. Knock will significantly be reduced or disappear. Correct by replacing both timing gear and crank gear as a matched set. The two gears should have a backlash clearance of .003 to .004. If more than .009 inch backlash, an oversize (.005) timing gear should be installed.
6. WRIST PIN SLAP: This can not be detected by shorting out the cylinder plugs. Rapidly accelerate and decelerate the engine speed. The engine will pass through a certain speed range when the wrist pin will rattle at about the same pitch as a valve tappet noise. This can be corrected by installing a new wrist pin bushing in the rod or new wrist pin f badly worn. Wrist pin should fit the piston and connecting rod with a tight metal to metal fit. The pin can be pushed into the piston and rod with a slight pressure of the hand. Pin to rod clearance is .0003 to .0005 inches.

Dec 06, 2013 | Nissan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

V6 knocking noise


A KNOCKING SOUND IN THE ENGINE IS MOST LIKELY CAUSED BY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
1. PISTON SLAP: Makes a sharp metallic noise. Idle engine and short out each cylinder plug. The noise will disappear when plug with bad piston is shorted. Noise will also disappear at acceleration. This can be caused by worn or out of round cylinder, or broken piston ring. Correct problem by re-boring cylinder and/or replacing piston.
2. VALVE NOISE: Makes clicking or rattle noise. Caused by excessive wear on valve stem or lifter, out of adjustment, or stuck valve. Correct by adjusting valve clearance, replace worn valve or lifter, regrind cam, replace valve guide and /or valve. A stuck valve can sometimes be loosened by passing oil through the carburetor while engine is running.

3. ROD BEARING KNOCK: Makes sharp metallic noise similar to a piston slap. Detection is opposite of piston slap. Rod knock is not heard at idle. Knock becomes louder as engine speed is increased. Caused by excessive rod bearing clearance. Correct by adjusting rod bearing clearance to .0015 inches by removing shims. May require re-pouring rod bearing.
4. REAR MAIN BEARING KNOCK: Makes dull knocking or thud noise. Detected at speeds between 20 and 50 MPH. Knock will normally decrease or disappear while pulling or decelerating. Noise will be detected the loudest at normal driving speed, when not pulling or decelerating. Correct by adjusting bearing clearance to .001 to .0015 inches. If knock is excessive, crank should be checked for out of roundness. May need to re-pour all main bearings to correct.
5. TIMING GEAR KNOCK: usually the most difficult to diagnose. If gear is loose or badly worn it will knock in all ranges. Run engine slightly above idle speed. Slowly open and close throttle. Knock will continue to be present, but just as engine slows down knock will become a slight rattle. Remove timing pin and reinsert into timing hole on timing gear cover. Press timing pin tightly against timing gear and accelerate slightly above idle. Knock will significantly be reduced or disappear. Correct by replacing both timing gear and crank gear as a matched set. The two gears should have a backlash clearance of .003 to .004. If more than .009 inch backlash, an oversize (.005) timing gear should be installed.
6. WRIST PIN SLAP: This can not be detected by shorting out the cylinder plugs. Rapidly accelerate and decelerate the engine speed. The engine will pass through a certain speed range when the wrist pin will rattle at about the same pitch as a valve tappet noise. This can be corrected by installing a new wrist pin bushing in the rod or new wrist pin f badly worn. Wrist pin should fit the piston and connecting rod with a tight metal to metal fit. The pin can be pushed into the piston and rod with a slight pressure of the hand. Pin to rod clearance is .0003 to .0005 inches.

Dec 06, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 99 cavalier with the 2.2 its has a knocking noise when u get the car up to 40 it stops knocking. when it gets to opperating temp the oil light comes on at idle and stop. When the light comes on...


Well yes a match is one option.
When you were replacing the rod bearings did you check the main bearings too ? My guess is a worn out main bearing.
Once you get up to speed the crank is not in such a strain as when you are accelerating. And the worn main bearings can cause the oil pressure to drop when the oil thins out at operating temp.

Aug 24, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 2004 trailbazer makes a knocking noise whan started, it gets quieter as ou drive it, but does not go away


Hello
Any knocking noise is more than likely due to worn connecting rod bearings, Crankshaft main bearings or piston or piston pin noise. Connecting rod bearing knocks and piston related noise quite some with warm up, piston noise tends to go completely away after about 5 minutes of run time, but there are exceptions to that run like a cracked piston skirt, crankshaft bearings don't quite very much. It would be my best quests without hearing the noise that you may have either a connecting rod or piston related noise. The best thing to do here is have a trained ear listen to the noise, any experienced technician will know very quickly what the noise is and where it is coming from. These types of noises are only common on high miles engines, with at least 100,000 miles on them is the general run or the engine has been run very low on oil repeated times, or the oil not changed at regular intervals or the engine has been severely overheated. My experience? 35 years as a dealer technican. I'm Master certified in all phases of auto and light truck repair.

Jul 03, 2011 | 2004 Chevrolet TrailBlazer

1 Answer

I have a 2004 Ford Explorer with a knocking sound coming from the engine. Was told I could be the timing chain. But it's not. What else could be making a loud knocking sound? Thanks.


If your truck has the 4.6 or 5.4 V8 then you know it has two timing chains. The lifters could be causing the knocking noise. If it sounds like it's coming from the top then I would suspect lifters. If it sounds like it's coming from the bottom of the engine then I would suspect main or rod bearings.

Mar 29, 2011 | 2004 Ford Explorer

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