Question about 1997 Honda Accord

1 Answer

WHAT IS BLEND DOOR

TRYING TO FIGURE OUY HOW TO FIX HEATER CHANGED THERMOSTAT HEATER CORE NOT PLUGGED NO BUBBLES IN COOLANT NO LOSS OF COOLANT BOYH HOSES ARE HOT UNHOOKED FROM SWITCH OPENED VAVE HOOKED UP HOSES STILL NO HEAT.

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Top Expert:

    An expert who has finished #1 on the weekly Top 10 Fixya Experts Leaderboard.

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

  • Honda Master
  • 76,164 Answers

A blend door is a plastic door inside the air ducting that moves between the heater core and the AC core to provide the desired ait temp at the outlet, either hot, cod or a "blend" of the two air streams passing over the heater core and AC core..

Posted on Feb 18, 2012

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

Heat and ac blower sound normal but very little air is moving inside the cabin. What can cause this?


Cabin air filter? Blower motor working on all speeds? Critters building nest in heater box

Feb 05, 2016 | AC Cars & Trucks

Tip

Heat troubleshooting


<span>There are a few reasons this might happen to your system.<span> </span>A typical system is shown in the diagram below:<span> </span></span><br /><br /><br /><img src="CC87E1A.jpg" /><br /><br />The system requires hot water from the engine to pass through the heater core and the blend (or mix) door positioned for air pushed by the blower motor to pass through the core.<span> </span>If the <a href="/../cars/r6235876-no_heat_fan_blowing_cold_air#">vehicle</a> has no air conditioning, the evaporator is absent from the system.<span> </span>Some designs also incorporate a control valve in the heater hose to stop coolant flow to the heater core when not in use. The blend door position is actuated by a stepper motor or cable.<br />Typical failure modes are as follows:<br /><span><span>1.<span> </span></span></span>Blend door stuck<br /><span><span>2.<span> </span></span></span>Blend door actuator failed motor or stripped gears<br />3. Blend door cable is broke or needs adjustment<br /><span><span>4.<span> </span></span></span>Temperature control switch failed<br /><span><span>5.<span> </span></span></span>Air pockets in engine cooling system<br /><span><span>6.<span> </span></span></span>Clogged heater core<br /><span><span>7.<span> </span></span></span>Heater coolant control valve failed closed<br />8. Thermostat failed open<br /><br /><b>Troubleshooting:</b><br />First, with your engine hot and the heater turned on, feel the heater hoses in the engine compartment as they attach to the heater core at the firewall.<span> </span>If either of the hoses is cold, the problem is likely a lack of adequate coolant flow.<span> </span><br /><br /><b>No or low coolant flow:<span> </span></b><br />Check for the presence of a control valve in one of the heater hoses--trace the hoses all the way to the engine.<span> </span>Not all vehicles have such valves.<span> </span>If you find one, check to see if it is actuating properly.<span> </span>It should receive a signal of some kind from the heater controls and open when the temperature control is turned to heat.<span> </span>If you cannot determine that the valve is opening, try taking one of the clamps off and removing the hose to see inside the valve. A typical vacuum operated heater flow control valve is shown below:<br /><br /><img src="7FA590D.jpg" /> <br /><br />The valve may also be actuated by a solenoid or wire cable. <br />If you have no valve, next check the cooling system for air. If you have a radiator cap, take it off and look inside.<span> </span>If it is not full, fill it with coolant and start the engine.<span> </span>Turn the heater on and let the engine run until it is warm and the thermostat has opened.<span> </span>Continue to fill the radiator or reservoir until the level stops falling.<span> </span>Check for the presence of any bleed ports in the system.<span> </span>Bleed ports may be on the housings that radiator or heater hoses attach to or may be installed in the hoses themselves.<span> </span>A typical Honda application is shown below:<br /><br /><img src="C655B97.jpg" /><br /><br />For stubborn cases, p<span>ark the <a href="/../#">car</a> uphill, take cap off radiator, start <a href="/../cars/r6235876-no_heat_fan_blowing_cold_air#">car</a>, fill radiator, let it warm up until <a href="/../#">thermostat</a> opens, bleed air out, fill to the neck of the radiator and watch for bubbles coming up. Once you have bled the air, if gas continues to come out, you may have a blown head gasket that is forming bubbles that can block coolant from entering the heater. In these cases, the heater may work well at speed but blow cold at idle.</span><br /><br />Clogged core: If the control valve is open and there is no air in the system, your heater core may be clogged.<span> A quick way to check for a clogged core is to turn the blower motor off for a while and then back on. If it produces warm air for only a short time and then cools down, your core is only passing a small amount of coolant. This can also be caused by a bad control valve, if you car has one or possibly by a weak water pump. </span>You can try flushing the core by removing the heater hoses and attaching a garden hose or other source of water pressure to force water through the core.<span> </span>Use an adapter to make a good seal and connect to the lower pipe to backflush the core.<span> </span>If the core will not flush or allow adequate flow, replace the heater core.<br /><br />Thermostat: if your car temperature is running cold and only warms up when idling, the heater will do the same. This is caused by a thermostat that has failed open, allowing too much coolant to flow through the radiator. <span>.</span><br /><br /><b>Blend door not moving to heat position:</b><br />If you have coolant flow through the heater core, the problem is with the blend door.<span> </span>The blend door is almost always actuated from under the dashboard.<span> </span>Many systems use an electric motor to actuate the blend door.<span> </span>Check any heater or A/C fuses before tearing into your system.<span> </span>You may need to remove a partition to see the actuator.<span> </span>The door should be to the right of center under the dash.<span> </span>A typical electric motor actuator design is shown below.<br /><br /><img src="4ED4FC8.jpg" /> <br /><br />The actuator can be on the top front or bottom of the duct.<span> </span>Consult a manual for your vehicle if you cannot locate the actuator.<span> </span>Once you can see the actuator, watch it while you change the temperature setting (key on unless it is cable operated).<span> </span>If the actuator doesn't move or turn, troubleshoot the reason.<span> </span>Systems such as the one in the above picture typically fail in the shaft attach or the internal gears on the actuator.<span> </span>If your actuator is getting power but not moving the door, replace the actuator.<span> </span>If the actuator is not getting power, troubleshoot the control switch.<span> </span>Due to the wide variety of designs, we cannot provide test tips for electric blend door control switches.<br />Whether your blend door is electric or cable operated, remove the actuator and operate the door with your hand.<span> </span>If the door sticks, the heater box must be removed and opened to free the door and restore unhindered operation.<br />If your blend door is cable operated, check the cable for proper attachment at the control lever and at the door lever.<span> </span>The cable sheath must be properly adjusted and firmly clamped for proper operation.<span> </span>To adjust, first remove the cable from the door and move the door lever with your hand to observe the range of motion.<span> </span>Then set the control to full hot, open the door fully, and reattach the cable, clamping the sheath so as to ensure the door opens fully when set to hot.<br />

on Jan 31, 2011 | Dodge Caravan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2000 oldsmobile bravada heater control valve location


If you are looking for some sort of water valve that diverts water to/from the heater core, forget it. They don't exist anymore. They went away shortly after the widely adapted use of air conditioning in today's modern cars. Now, hot coolant is routed thru the heater core at all times, but is controlled by a cable-operated, or vacuum operated "blend door" located inside the heater box. If you are not getting heat to the vehicle, there are a few possible problems:

1. Bad thermostat - thus low coolant temperature and lack of heat.
2. Clogged heater core - no water flow thru core, thus no heat.
3. Broken control head - loss of cable or vacuum actuation of blend door.
4. Broken heater box/vacuum tank - no actuation of blend door.

Of the items listed above, based on the age of the vehicle and the likelihood of occurrence, I would investigate them in the order of 2, 4, 1, 3.

Jan 20, 2016 | 2000 Oldsmobile Bravada

1 Answer

Why doesn't heater heat?


Loss of pressure in heater core, possible heater core leak? Or coolant leak?

Nov 10, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Heat not working


Sounds like the air blend door is not opening to let heat in.

Engine coolant is provided to the heater system by two 16 mm (5/8 inch inside diameter) heater hoses. With the engine idling at normal running temperature, set the heater-A/C controls as follows. Temperature control to full Heat, Mode control to Floor, Blower control to the highest speed setting. Using a test thermometer, check the air temperature coming from the center floor outlets and compare this reading to the Temperature Reference table.

If the floor outlet air temperature is insufficient, check that the cooling system is operating to specifications. Both heater hoses should be HOT to the touch (the coolant return hose should be slightly cooler than the supply hose). If the coolant return hose is much cooler than the supply hose, locate and repair the engine coolant flow obstruction in heater system.

POSSIBLE LOCATIONS OR CAUSE OF OBSTRUCTED COOLANT FLOW
If coolant flow is verified and the heater floor outlet temperature is insufficient, a mechanical problem may exist.

POSSIBLE LOCATION OR CAUSE OF INSUFFICIENT HEAT
  • Obstructed cowl air intake.
  • Obstructed heater system outlets.
  • Blend-air door not functioning properly.
TEMPERATURE CONTROL
If heater floor outlet temperature cannot be adjusted with the heater-A/C control temperature control lever, one of the following could require service:

Jan 21, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

No heat replaced heater core thermostat


So the blend door opens? Does the fan motor blow? Are both heater hoses hot? That would indicate the coolant is circulating through the core.

Dec 12, 2013 | Ford Windstar Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

This morning we turned the heater on. When we turned the knob on the dash all that came out was cold air. We tried every setting on the postion for the air to come out. It still was the same


Your thermostat may have gone bad. I have a 1999 Toyota Camry, had sim. problem, changed thermostat, fixed problem and was getting warm air again.

Mar 10, 2010 | 2003 Chevrolet Malibu

2 Answers

Heat does not work. coolant level ok and temp is ok


Might try checking the temp blend door operation or the temp blend door actuator. If all good there perhaps the control head itself is faulty.

Oct 08, 2009 | 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

5 Answers

1999 Ford Windstar 3.8 no heat


If you have a knock or clicking noise behind the radio, it is the blend motor. The blend door is spring loaded and the gears in the blend motor are "stripped". The door is spring loaded so that the door is closed to the heater core. About 2 hours to replace and a lot of bending and stretching. You don't have to remove the dash, but all of the trim, radio, and controls will need to come out.

Nov 12, 2008 | 1999 Ford Windstar

Not finding what you are looking for?
1997 Honda Accord Logo

578 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Honda Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76164 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22156 Answers

Kevin Daniels

Level 3 Expert

1455 Answers

Are you a Honda Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...