Question about 2003 Chevrolet Trailblazer Ext

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Head lights go on and off while driving and sometimes stay off

Help. I will be driving on the freeway and my lights will go off and then when I exit I have to use my high beams to be visible. I had taken my car to two mechanics and they both said that it has to do it while the car is there. Well duh, it happens at dusk to night. I finally talked in the last mechanic to take out my cluster and send it in to be reprogrammed or rest and then it was placed back into my car. STILL having the problem. How can there be any sense to this?

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  • cathmac Oct 25, 2008

    Cathmac can be reached for at catherine_macy40@comcast.net by cathmac on Oct 25, 2008
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    Help. I will be driving on the freeway and my lights will go off and then when I exit I have to use my high beams to be visible. I had taken my car to two mechanics and they both said that it has to do it while the car is there. Well duh, it happens at dusk to night. I finally talked in the last mechanic to take out my cluster and send it in to be reprogrammed or rest and then it was placed back into my car. STILL having the problem. How can there be any sense to this?
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  • cathmac Oct 25, 2008

    mas66

    Thank you for your help. Just one question. I would like to see if I could do it myself. Do you know how I could obtain the drawing or location for the headlight relay? I looked for my owner's book but it no where to be found.

    cathmac

  • cathmac Oct 26, 2008

    Thank you very much for the information. I just need to now find the specs to locate it

    Thank you

  • Anonymous Dec 17, 2008

    Headlights go off for no apparent reason while driving at night. Sometimes they come back on other times the don't until I turn off car for a time. Happens every month or so.

  • Anonymous Dec 19, 2008

    I been having this problem for over a year now. I have not discovered a solution to this yet. My mechanic thinks it could be the headlight dimmer switch but does not know until he looks at it. Not willing to pay money for maybe so I have been dealing with this.

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I would suggest replacing the headlight relay, relays can fail when they get hot causing symptoms such as what you describe. If you are able to locate the relay yourself, you could try swapping it with another relay the same (check part numbers on relay case are the same) and trialling it to see if the fault still occurs. I would drive around with the lights on during the day and check periodically to see if they fail, and if they do, go straight to the mechanic and get them to look at it while the fault is present. If they never fail during the day, and the vehicle has autolamps, it may be related to this, but that would need to be diagnosed by a garage, or probably a Chev dealer.

Posted on Oct 25, 2008

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  • When you have accelerated up to around 60 mph and have safely merged into the flow of traffic, stay in the slow lane and maintain a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for a minimum of five miles. Please use the cruise control to help you maintain speed.
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