Question about 2001 Pontiac Bonneville

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P0102, p0443 replaced MAF sensor and solenoid purge canister, but, codes keep coming back. Car runs fine. What else should I check?

Posted by Anonymous on

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 275 Answers

SOURCE: 2004 Pontiac Grand Prix Evaporative Canister

you should be able to fix it look for a can near the fuel tank that has vacuum hoses coming out of it and you should be able to just buy the bad solenoid

Posted on Nov 03, 2008

  • 83 Answers

SOURCE: 96 bonneville se non supercharged

check gas cap seal will cause small leak codes.

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

Molson02536
  • 3854 Answers

SOURCE: Have P0102 code and replaced the MAF sensor and

A code P0102 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
The MAF may be disconnected, or a wiring connection may be bad

The MAF may be dirty or otherwise contaminated (Note: if you use a reusable oiled air filter, be careful not to apply too much oil or that can contaminate the MAF).

The MAF Sensor may be faulty

The vehicle computer may be faulty (very rare)

The simplest thing to do is to reset the code and see if it comes back. Then start with the cheapest, easiest repair procedures:

Verify that the Mass Air Flow Sensor wiring is connected properly and that there are no broken / frayed wires.

Inspect for any air leaks near the MAF sensor.

Take the MAF out and clean it using a spray cleaner such as brake cleaner or electrical contact cleaner. Be gentle with the sensor.

Check the voltage of the MAF sensor (refer to a repair manual for vehicle specific information)

Replace the MAF sensor.

Good luck and hope this helps. You can try pulling the fuse to the ECM with the ignition key in the on position and then placing it back in after a few seconds. 
Then start the car, it may stall but let it and just start it over again. The ECM is just learning the engine and transmission again, making adjustments like it's the first start up during manufacturing and go for a test drive. 

Posted on May 03, 2009

motor1258
  • 6674 Answers

SOURCE: Have P0102 code and replaced the MAF sensor and

Take a close look at the wires to the oxygen sensors, and make sure none are touching or close to the manifolds or exhaust, or have been, and may have a burnt spot on them.Don't forget, if they are not touching now, they may be when going down the road at highway speeds so make sure that can't happen either. It's a pretty common reason for that fuse to blow, because of oxygen sensor wires touching manifold or exhaust pipes.

Posted on May 03, 2009

MNfisherman
  • 11896 Answers

SOURCE: after changing fuel pump 2 days ago on my 97

You can test the MAF before replacing. It may be a problem with the circuit itself or just a fluke from another problem that is connected to this sensor.

There are two basic types of mass airflow sensors: hot wire and hot film. In the first type, a very thin wire (about 0.2 mm thick) is used as the heated element.
f27-31.gif Components of a hot wire-type mass airflow sensor. Courtesy of Ford Motor Company. The element temperature is set at 100° to 200°C above incoming air temperature. Each time the ignition switch is turned to the off position, the wire is heated to approximately 1,000°C for 1 second to burn off any accumulated dust and contaminants.
The second type uses a nickel foil sensor, which is kept 75°C above ambient air temperatures. It does not require a burn-off period and therefore is potentially longer lasting than the hot wire type.
A faulty MAF will cause driveability problems resulting from incorrect ignition timing and improper air/fuel ratios.
Vane-type MAF Sensors
A vane-type MAF sensor is found on many import and domestic vehicles with EFI. All intake air must flow through the sensor. Some MAF sensors are called volume air flow meters

  • Begin checking a vane-type MAF sensor by checking the voltage supply wire and the ground wire to the MAF module before checking the sensor voltage signal.
  • Always follow the recommended test procedure in the manufacturer's service manual and use the specifications supplied by the manufacturer.
  • Typically, to test the sensor, a digital multimeter (DMM) is used and set on a DC voltage scale. The negative meter lead is connected to ground and the red lead to the MAF signal wire.
f_32.44.gif A voltmeter connected to measure the signal from a MAF sensor. Reproduced with permission from Fluke Corporation.
  • Turn on the ignition switch and press the min/max button, if available, on the DMM.
  • Slowly push the MAF vane from the closed to the wide-open position, and allow the vane to slowly return to the closed position.
f_27.33.gif Move the MAF sensor air vane from open to close to test it. Reproduced with permission from Fluke Corporation.
  • Observe the maximum and minimum voltage readings as the vane was moved.
  • If the minimum voltage signal is zero, there may be an open circuit in the MAF sensor variable resistor.
  • When the voltage signal is not within the manufacturer's specifications, replace the sensor.
WARNING While pushing the mass air flow sensor vane open and closed, be careful not to mark or damage the vane or sensor housing.
  • Some vehicle manufacturers specify ohmmeter tests for the MAF sensor.
  • With the MAF sensor removed, connect the ohmmeter across the sensor's output and input terminals.
f_32.45.gif Ohmmeter connections to a MAF sensor. Reprinted with permission.
  • The resistance at these terminals is normally 200 to 600 ohms.
  • Connect the ohmmeter leads to the specified MAF sensor terminals, and move the vane from the fully closed to the fully open position.
  • With each specified meter connection and vane position, the ohmmeter should indicate the specified resistance.
f_32.46.gif Resistance specifications for a typical MAF sensor with door open and closed. Reprinted with permission.
  • When the ohmmeter leads are connected to the sensor's input and output terminals, the ohmmeter reading should increase smoothly as the sensor vane is opened and closed.
  • To check a vane-type MAF with a lab scope, connect the positive lead to the output signal terminal and the negative scope lead to a good ground.
  • This type MAF should display an analog voltage signal when the engine is accelerated. A defective MAF will have sudden and erratic voltage changes.
f_32.47.gif The trace of a defective vane-type MAF sensor. Reproduced with permission from Fluke Corporation. Hot-Wire-Type MAF Sensors
The test procedure for heated resistor and hot-wire MAF sensors varies depending on the vehicle make and year. Always follow the test procedure in the appropriate service manual. A frequency test may be performed on some MAF sensors, such as the AC Delco MAF on some General Motors' products.
  • To check the MAF sensor's voltage signal and frequency, connect a voltmeter across the MAF voltage signal wire and ground wire.
  • Start the engine and observe the voltmeter reading.
  • On some MAF sensors, this reading should be 2.5 volts.
  • Lightly tap the MAF sensor housing with a screwdriver handle and watch the voltmeter pointer.
  • If the pointer fluctuates or the engine misfires, replace the MAF sensor.
  • Some MAF sensors have experienced loose internal connections, which cause erratic voltage signals and engine misfiring and surging.
  • Set the DMM so that it can read the frequency of DC voltage.
  • With it still connected to the signal wire and ground, the meter should read about 30 Hz with the engine idling.
  • Now, increase the engine speed, and record the meter reading at various speeds.
  • Graph the frequency readings. The MAF sensor frequency should increase smoothly and gradually in relation to engine speed.
  • If the MAF sensor frequency reading is erratic, replace the sensor.
f_32..48.gif Satisfactory and unsatisfactory MAF sensor frequency readings. Reproduced with permission from Fluke Corporation.
  • When a scanner is used to diagnose a General Motors' vehicle, one test mode displays grams per second from the MAF sensor. This mode provides an accurate test of the MAF sensor.
  • The grams per second reading should be 4 to 7 with the engine idling.
  • This reading should gradually increase as the engine speed increases.
  • When the engine speed is constant, the grams-per-second reading should remain constant.
  • If the grams-per-second reading is erratic at a constant engine speed or if this reading varies when the sensor is tapped lightly, the sensor is defective.
  • A MAF sensor fault code may not be present with an erratic grams-per-second reading, but the erratic reading indicates a defective sensor.
  • Frequency-varying types of MAF sensors can be tested with a lab scope.
  • The waveform should appear as a series of square waves.
f_32.49.gif A normal trace for a frequency-varying MAF sensor. Courtesy of Progressive Diagnostics--WaveFile AutoPro.
  • When the engine speed and intake air flow increases, the frequency of the MAF sensor signals should increase smoothly and proportionately to the change in engine speed.
  • If the MAF or connecting wires is defective, the trace will show an erratic change in frequency.
f_32.50.gif The trace of a defective frequency-varying MAF sensor. Courtesy of EDGE Diagnostics Systems.

There is also a
Mass Air Flow (MAF) Burn-Off Module Operation:
00375_maf_burn_off_module.jpgA semi-conductor control for an electronic-ignition system.

Posted on Nov 17, 2009

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Error code 0440 on a 2002 buick custom


Go to an auto parts store and get a Haynes repair manual for car it will have the code meanings for any and all codes on that vehicle. Only bad thing is the book cost around $30 maybe you will get lucky and one will be open and you could take a peak inside.

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I got a check engine code P0455 AND P0171 on my 2003 volkswagen jetta. My car runs fine usually at idle, but if you start driving, you can only push it half throttle before it starts studdering. What



Trouble Code: P0171

Fuel System Too Lean (Cylinder Bank 1)
Possible Causes:


Air leaks after the MAF sensor, or leaks in the PCV system Exhaust leaks before or near where the HO2S is mounted Fuel injector(s) restricted or not supplying enough fuel. Fuel pump not supplying enough fuel during high fuel demand conditions. Leaking EGR gasket, or leaking EGR valve diaphragm. MAF sensor dirty (causes ECM to underestimate airflow). Vehicle running out of fuel or engine oil dip stick not seated .


Trouble Code: P0455

EVAP Control System Large Leak Detected
Possible Causes:


Aftermarket EVAP hardware non-conforming to specifications EVAP canister tube, EVAP canister purge outlet tube or EVAP return tube disconnected or cracked, or canister is damaged EVAP canister purge valve stuck closed, or canister damaged. Fuel filler cap missing, loose (not tightened) or the wrong part. Loose fuel vapor hose/tube connections to EVAP components . Canister vent (CV) solenoid stuck open. Fuel tank pressure (FTP) sensor has failed mechanically .Here are the solutions.

Aug 09, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

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Diagnostic code for 96 ford ranger-code number - p1443


Check the voltage on the purge flow (PF) sencor, with engine running...

Jun 19, 2011 | Ford Ranger Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

P1443 code How do I fix this code problem on my 97 Ford ranger?


P1443 is the Evaporative Emission Control System Control Valve. Any time you get this code always check your gas cap. If it is not installed all the way, or leaks, it can cause the evap emission code to come up. If the cap is okay...

The problem is probably caused by the Canister Purge Assembly. This assembly connects the intake manifold to the charcoal canister and the assembly is made up of hoses, a valve and a sensor. On the 1997 Ranger, it is located near the front of the engine compartment on the driver's side (the canister is right behind the driver's side headlight). Apparently, if there are any cracks in the hoses, or if the valve or the sensor wears out, this will cause the check engine light to come on, and return the P1443 code.

Part numbers for the canister purge solenoid/flow sensor assemblies:

F57Z-9C987-AB Canister Purge Solenoid/Flow Sensor
Assembly - 2.3L F57Z-9C987-CA Canister Purge Solenoid/Flow Sensor
Assembly - 3.0L F57Z-9C87-BA Canister Purge Solenoid/Flow Sensor
Assembly - 4.0L

Part cost = $65 to $100 depending on engine size - good luck :O)

Feb 17, 2011 | Ford Ranger Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Code says evaporator purge solenoid


Which code specifically? Do not assume you need a new solenoid. Our recommendation will depend on the specific code and some troubleshooting results. I usually recommend checking over all the EVAP vacuum lines and the gas cap too whenever there is a purge valve code. Check the vacuum lines at the cannister in the left rear bumper. I will paste info on the purge solenoid below.

P0440 Evaporative emission (EVAP) system - malfunction

Possible causes: Hose connection(s), intake leak, EVAP canister purge valve


P0441 Evaporative emission (EVAP) system - incorrect flow detected

Possible causes: Hose connection(s), intake leak, EVAP canister purge valve


P0442 Evaporative emission (EVAP) system - small leak detected

Possible causes: Hose connection(s), intake leak, EVAP canister, EVAP canister purge valve


P0443 Evaporative emission (EVAP) canister purge valve - circuit malfunction

Possible causes: Wiring, EVAP canister purge valve, ECM


P0444 Evaporative emission (EVAP) canister purge valve -open circuit

Possible causes: Wiring open circuit, EVAP canister purge valve, ECM


P0445 Evaporative emission (EVAP) canister purge valve -short circuit

Possible causes: Wiring short circuit, EVAP canister purge valve, ECM


P0450 Evaporative emission (EVAP) pressure sensor - circuit malfunction

Possible causes: Wiring, EVAP pressure sensor, ECM


P0455 Evaporative emission (EVAP) system - large leak detected

Possible causes: Hose connection(s), intake leak, EVAP canister, EVAP canister purge valve


P0456 Evaporative emission system - very small leak detected

Possible causes: Mechanical fault, hose connection(s), EVAP pressure "sensor


P0457 Evaporative emission system - leak detected (fuel cap loose/off)

Possible causes: Mechanical fault, hose connection(s), EVAP pressure sensor


P0458 Evaporative emission system, purge control valve -circuit low

Possible causes: Wiring short to earth, EVAP valve


P0459 Evaporative emission system, purge control valve -circuit high
Possible causes: Wiring short to positive, EVAP valve


Evaporative Emission Purge Solenoid

Description & Operation
The duty cycle EVAP canister purge solenoid (DCP) regulates the rate of vapor flow from the EVAP canister to the intake manifold. The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) operates the solenoid.
During the cold start warm-up period and the hot start time delay, the PCM does not energize the solenoid. When de-energized, no vapors are purged. The PCM de-energizes the solenoid during open loop operation.
The engine enters closed loop operation after it reaches a specified temperature and the time delay ends. During closed loop operation, the PCM cycles (energizes and de-energizes) the solenoid 5 or 10 times per second, depending upon operating conditions. The PCM varies the vapor flow rate by changing solenoid pulse width. Pulse width is the amount of time that the solenoid is energized. The PCM adjusts solenoid pulse width based on engine operating condition.
Removal & Installation
The duty cycle evaporative (EVAP) canister purge solenoid is located in the engine compartment near the brake master cylinder.

  1. Disconnect electrical connector at solenoid.
  2. Disconnect vacuum lines at solenoid.
  3. Lift solenoid slot from mounting bracket for Removal & Installation.

To Install:
  1. Position solenoid slot to mounting bracket.
  2. Connect vacuum lines to solenoid. Be sure vacuum lines are firmly connected and not leaking or damaged. If leaking, a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) may be set with certain emission packages.
  3. Connect electrical connector to solenoid.
Purge solenoid location:

jturcotte_65.gif
EVAP cannister location:
jturcotte_66.gif

Nov 05, 2010 | 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2 Answers

Check valve missing in fuel tank filler neck.


P1444 Purge Flow Sensor Circuit Input Low 0
The evaporative emission control system checks to make sure there are no leaks in the lines that run from the gas tank to the charcoal canister and up to the engine. It also checks to make sure the gas cap is sealing correctly.
When you fill your car with gas, the vapors in the tank get forced into a canister filled with activated charcoal. Also, on a hot day as the gas heats up and vaporizes, those same vapors push into the canister where they're stored. But the charcoal can only hold so much vapor. At some point it has to be emptied. The emptying process is called "canister purge." Here's how it works.
The computer orders a canister purge by powering open a PURGE solenoid. That opens the vacuum line between the canister and the intake manifold. At the same time, it opens a VENT solenoid. That allows fresh air into the canister. So the engine is literally sucking out the gas vapors and purging the canister with fresh air. The computer has to adapt its fuel strategy to take advantage of all the extra gas vapors coming into the engine.
The computer notices the canister is empty when it detects a leaner condition (all the vapors are used up) and it resumes normal fuel delivery. Some car manufacturers then close the VENT solenoid but leave the PURGE solenoid open. That creates a vacuum throughout the entire fuel storage system. Once the correct vacuum is reached, it closed the PURGE solenoid and waits to see if the vacuum holds. If it doesn, the system passes the test. If it detects a leak, it sets a code.
In this code P1444, the computer sees a lower than expected value on the purge flow sensor. bottom line? replace the purge flow sensor.

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1 Answer

99 5.4 Expedition issues


P0401 - EGR Flow Insufficient Detected The EGR system is monitored during steady state driving conditions while the EGR is commanded on. The test fails when the signal from the DPF EGR sensor indicates that EGR flow is less than the desired minimum.
  • Vacuum supply
  • EGR valve stuck closed
  • EGR valve leaks vacuum
  • EGR flow path restricted
  • EGRVR circuit shorted to PWR
  • VREF open to DPF EGR sensor
  • DPF EGR sensor downstream hose off or plugged
  • EGRVR circuit open to PCM
  • VPWR open to EGRVR solenoid
  • DPF EGR sensor hoses both off
  • DPF EGR sensor hoses reversed
  • Damaged EGR orifice tube
  • Damaged EGRVR solenoid
  • Damaged PCM

P1299 - Cylinder Head Over Temperature Protection Active Indicates an engine overheat condition was detected by the cylinder head temperature (CHT) sensor. An FMEM Strategy called Fail-safe Cooling was activated to cool the engine.
  • Engine cooling system concerns
  • Low engine coolant level
  • Base engine concerns

P0300 - Random Misfire The random misfire DTC indicates multiple cylinders are misfiring or the PCM cannot identify which cylinder is misfiring.
  • Camshaft position sensor (CMP)
  • Low fuel: less than 1/8 tank
  • Stuck open EGR valve

P0443 - EVAP Control System Canister Purge Valve Circuit Malfunction The PCM monitors the EVAP canister purge valve circuit for an electrical failure. The test fails when the signal moves outside the minimum or maximum allowable calibrated parameters for a specified purge duty cycle by PCM command.
  • VPWR circuit open
  • EVAP canister purge valve circuit shorted to GND
  • Damaged EVAP canister purge valve
  • EVAP canister purge valve circuit open
  • EVAP canister purge valve circuit shorted to VPWR
  • Damaged PCM

P1451 - EVAP Control System Canister Vent Solenoid Circuit Malfunction Monitors the canister vent (CV) solenoid circuit for an electrical failure. The test fails when the signal moves outside the minimum or maximum allowable calibrated parameters for a specified canister vent duty cycle by PCM command.
  • VPWR circuit open
  • CV solenoid circuit shorted to PWR GND or CHASSIS GND
  • Damaged CV solenoid
  • CV solenoid circuit open
  • CV solenoid circuit shorted to VPWR
  • Damaged PCM

P1309 - Misfire Monitor Disabled When the misfire monitor is disabled, usually due to the input signal generated by the camshaft position (CMP) sensor, by sensing the passage of teeth from the CMP wheel.
  • Camshaft position sensor
  • Powertrain control module
  • ECT, MAF, and CKP sensors

with the codes you have here I would look in the direction of the egr valve first because that will cause the bucking and stalling, and the misfires, but so will the canister vent solonoid. the misfire codes and the cylinder overtemp code could be from overheating or because if the misfires.

Jul 27, 2009 | 1999 Ford Expedition

3 Answers

04 sonata hard tostart after fueling


Sounds like the 'Purge Control Solenoid Valve' to me. The evaporative canister (charcoal canister) absorbs the vapors from the fuel tank).. sometimes this canister becomes 'saturated' and the 'PURGE CONTROL SOLENOID VALVE' sucks RAW fuel into the intake manifold (causing a 'flooding' fuel condition).. but ONLY if this valve is STUCK OPEN or LEAKING. Replace this valve.. go from there.

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1 Answer

2002 Cavalier error code 440 and 452 What do they mean?


This indicates that a part of the Evap control system  is no longer functioning correctly. The Evap system consists of many parts, including (but not limited to) the Gas Cap, fuel lines, carbon canister, purge valve, and other hoses. The (EVAP) emission control system prevents the escape of fuel vapors from a cars fuel system. Fuel vapors are routed by hoses to a charcoal canister for storage. Later, when the engine is running a purge control valve opens allowing intake vacuum to siphon the fuel vapors into the engine.
A code P0440 could mean one or more of the following has happened:
The gas cap is not installed or working properly
The purge solenoid has failed
The canister is plugged and not working properly
TRY this first: Remove and reinstall the gas cap or replace, clear the code, and drive for a day and see if the codes come back.
Inspect the Evap system for cuts/holes in tubes/hoses
Inspect for damaged or disconnected hoses around the Evap purge solenoid
Check and/or replace the sensor
Check and/or replace the purge valve

P0452 Evaporative Emission Control System Pressure Sensor Low Input

Good luck and hope this helps. Recap star with the simple and replace the gas cap with a dealer OEM not a after market. If that does not fix it then change the sensor as indicated with the P0452 code. You can get the sensor from Auto Zone and they can give yo the step by step instruction to get the job done. Good luck and keep me posted. 

Jun 14, 2009 | 2002 Chevrolet Cavalier Coupe

1 Answer

I have a 2001 grand am se p0440 code comes up


This indicates that a part of the EVAP control system is no longer fuctioning correctly. The EVAP system consists of many parts, including (but not limited to) the gas cap, fuel lines, carbon canister, purge valve, and other hoses. The (EVAP) emission control system prevents the escape of fuel vapors from a vehicle's fuel system. Fuel vapors are routed by hoses to a charcoal canister for storage. Later, when the engine is running a purge control valve opens allowing intake vacuum to siphon the fuel vapors into the engine.
Causes:
A code P0440 could mean one or more of the following has happened:
  • The gas cap is not installed or working properly
  • The purge solenoid has failed
  • The canister is plugged and not working properly

With a P0440 OBD-II trouble code, diagnosis can be tricky at times. Here are some things to try:
  • Remove and reinstall the gas cap, clear the code, and drive for a day and see if the codes come back.
  • Inspect the EVAP system for cuts/holes in tubes/hoses
  • Inspect for damaged or disconnected hoses around the Evap purge solenoid
  • Check and/or replace the sensor
  • Check and/or replace the purge valve
  • Have a professional use a smoke machine to detect leaks

Feb 20, 2009 | 2001 Pontiac Grand Am SE

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