Question about 2003 Lincoln Navigator

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Front passenger side air bag deflated...

My son and I installed new brake pads on his 03 Navigator, on all four wheels last night and unfortunately we did not use the designated jacking points to raise the vehicle. Today the right front is deflated and the pump is working but the vehicle looks rather lopsided. Is there a cure for this or did we screw up the air bag?

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Disconnect the battery for 10 minutes and let the system reset, it should correct itself, if not a trip to the Ford dealer is in order, you could have ruptured the air spring

Posted on Oct 21, 2008

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Where is passenger side air bag relay 2007 MKZ


There is no relay for the passenger side air bag . What seams to be the trouble ? There is possibly a code set in the air bag control module .
Air Bag and Safety Belt Pretensioner Supplemental Restraint System (SRS) The air bag supplemental restraint system (SRS) is designed to provide increased collision protection for front seat and second row outboard occupants, in addition to that provided by the 3-point safety belt system. Safety belt use is necessary to obtain the best occupant protection and to receive the full advantage of the SRS.
This vehicle line contains dual stage deployment (advanced restraint system) driver and front passenger air bag modules. These vehicles are also equipped with driver and front passenger safety belt retractor pretensioners. These vehicles can also be equipped with optional side air curtains that deploy from the A-pillar to the C-pillar upon a side impact. Vehicles with optional side air curtains are also equipped with seat side air bag modules in the front seats.
Side air curtains deploy from the headliner, protecting the first and second row outboard occupants during a side impact. Seat side air bag modules deploy from the outboard front seat backrest upon a side impact. In addition, a front impact severity sensor is mounted to the lower radiator support, a seat position sensor is mounted to the driver seat and a usage detection switch is added to the front driver and passenger outboard buckles. If equipped with optional side air curtain modules and seat side air bag modules, there are an additional 4 side impact sensors.
Vehicles are also equipped with an occupant classification sensor (OCS) system as part of the front passenger seat. The OCS system includes 2 OCS rails and an OCS module.
Passenger Air Bag Deactivation (PAD) Indicator
The passenger air bag deactivation (PAD) indicator is a visual indicator used to inform the front seat occupants of the passenger air bag deactivation state. The PAD indicator is a stand-alone lamp installed into the vehicle instrument panel in a position visible to each front seat occupant.
The restraints control module (RCM) controls the state of the PAD indicator through a direct hardwire connection, based on information provided by the occupant classification sensor (OCS) system. The PAD indicator is lit to indicate the passenger air bag module is disabled. An exemption to this is when the front passenger seat is determined to be empty and passenger safety belt buckle unbuckled, and therefore indication of a deactivated passenger air bag module is not necessary. In all other cases, the PAD indicator is unlit when the passenger air bag module is enabled.
When the ignition switch is in the ON position, the PAD indicator prove-out period is initiated by the RCM. The RCM briefly activates the PAD indicator to prove-out the indicator function and verify to the front occupants correct functional operation of the PAD indicator.
The PAD indicator will be lit/unlit within 1.0 to 1.5 seconds of a change of state from the OCS system.
When an OCS system fault is present, the RCM defaults the passenger air bag module to the last valid state received from the OCS system until the ignition switch is turned OFF. If the OCS system fault is still present when the ignition switch is turned ON, the RCM defaults the passenger air bag module to enabled regardless of the size of occupant in the front passenger seat. The PAD indicator will be unlit. For information on the OCS system, refer to Occupant Classification Sensor System in this section.
The following table indicates the passenger air bag status and the PAD indicator status based the size of the front outboard passenger occupant.

Oct 04, 2015 | 2007 Lincoln MKZ

Tip

Tips for changing break pads, money saving tips!


Make sure the vehicle is cooled down - If you have recently driven, you may be working with extremely hot pads, calipers and rotors. Be sure that these parts are safe to touch before moving on.

Loosen the lug nuts on the wheels - Using a lug wrench, (one is usually provided along with the car's jack,) loosen each of the lug nuts that hold the wheels onto the car about two thirds of the way
.
  1. Jack the car up - Locate a safe place to position the car jack under your car. Check the user's manual or check for markings that indicate where to place the jack. Put some chocks behind the wheels that are on the ground to stop the car from rolling forward or back. Carefully jack the car up until the wheel can be removed easily. Place a jack stand or blocks under the frame of the vehicle. Dont trust the jack alone. Repeat for the other side of the car so that both sides are securely supported.
  2. Remove the wheels - Finish loosening and remove the nuts. Pull the wheel straight out towards you to remove it.
  3. If the wheel rims are Alloy and are either seized or partially seized on the studs, try kicking the tyre at the bottom with your foot a few times and hopefully it will move. when this occurs, you should clean the studs, stud holes, Rotor mounting surface, and the rear mounting surface of the alloy wheel - with a wire brush and apply anti seize compound before refitting the wheel.
  4. You should now be looking at the rotor (a large, flat metal disc) and the caliper (a large clamp-like device wrapped around the top of the rotor).
  5. Remove the caliper bolts - There are many different ways that the caliper is secured and different Caliper designs necessitating different removal procedures. The mounting position also depends on the Caliper design and whether it is an all one piece, a two piece, or a more complex design Caliper. All One piece Calipers are generally secured with between 2 to four bolts at the inside of the stub axle housing. Spray these bolts with WD-40 or to aid in removing them. Using a correct size Socket or Ring spanner, loosen and remove the bolts MAKING ABSOLUTELY SURE THAT THERE ARE NO SHIMS FITTED BETWEEN THE CALIPER MOUNTING BOLTS AND MOUNTING SURFACE. If there are they must be refitted as they were or the Caliper will not sit correctly.
  6. If any do fall out unexpectedly, you will need to refit the Caliper without the brake pads and using a combination of feeler guages, measure the difference between the pad mounting surface to the Caliper at the top and Bottom. Then, work out the difference/s and allocate the shims accordingly.
  7. Alternatively, many Japanese vehicles use a 2 piece sliding Caliper that only requires the removal of 2x forward facing, upper and lower, slider bolts, and NOT the removal of the entire caliper. These bolts are often 12 or 14mm heads.
  8. Additionally, if these caliper are completely removed, it is much more difficult to fit the brake pads into them.
  • Check the caliper pressure - The caliper should now move a slight amount if you shake it. If not the caliper is under pressure and it may fly off when you remove the bolts. Take extra precaution to not be in its path, whether it is loose or not.
  1. Next, have a piece of light tie wire handy, about a foot long, before you proceed.
  2. As the caliper will still be connected to the brake line, hang it up carefully by the wire, in the wheel well, so that it doesn't drop and have any weight on the flexible brake hose.
  3. Remove the top of the Brake Master cylinder from under the engine hood and inspect the fluid level before the pistons are 'Squeezed' back to enable the new brake pads to be fitted. Many mechanics draw some fluid from the master cylinder before proceding to squeeze the brake Caliper pistons.
  4. However, a better method is bleed the old Caliper fluid off by fitting a brake bleeding hose to the Caliper nipple, place the hose in a small bottle and undo the bleeder nipple as the pistons are squeezed. They are easily squeezed with one hand using large 12 inch water pump pliers - much easier than C or G clamps. So, the pliers are held in one hand and the bleeder spanner in the other. If it was not intended to bleed the brakes they still do not need to be, but the old fluid will have been removed from the Calipers at the same time as squeezing the pistons fully inwards. Repeat this with the other pad. Note that there is normally only one piston to be compressed for the right front and likewise for the left front.
  5. Remove the pads - Note how each brake pad is attached. They typically snap or clip in with attached metal clips. Remove both pads. They may take a little force to pop out, so take care not to damage the caliper or brake line while getting them out.
  6. Put the new pads on - Spread the special anti seize lubricant that came with your pads, (if it's not provided you can get it at any auto store,) sparingly on the metal contact edges and on the back of the pads, the surface of any shims and the piston pad contact area. This will prevent a lot of annoying squeaking. Attach the new pads exactly the way the old ones were attached.
  7. Check the brake fluid - Check your vehicle's brake fluid level and add some if necessary. Replace the brake fluid reservoir cap when finished.
  8. Replace the caliper - Slide the caliper slowly back over the rotor, proceeding easily so as not to damage anything. Replace and tighten the bolts that hold the caliper in place.
  9. Put the wheel back on - Slide the wheel back into place and hand tighten each of the lug nuts snug.
  10. Lower the car - With one side of the car supported by the jack, remove the block or stand on that side and slowly release the jack and to lower the car. Repeat for the other side so that both wheels are back on the ground.
  11. Tighten the lug nuts - Moving in a "star" pattern, tighten one lug nut, then one across from it until each nut is fully tightened to torque specification.
  12. See technical info to find the torque spec for your vehicle. This will insure the lugs have been tightened enough to prevent the wheel coming off or overtightening.
  13. Start the vehicle - Making sure the vehicle is in neutral or park, pump the brakes 15 to 20 times to insure proper seating. Push the brake pedal and put the vehicle in gear if it rolls more than a foot put the vehicle into park.
  14. Test your new brake pads and installation - Going no more than 5 MPH on a quiet residential street, brake like normal. If the vehicle seems to stopping normally, repeat the test and go up to 10 MPH. Repeat several more times, gradually going up to 35 or 40 MPH. You can also go 5 MPH in reverse and brake. These braking tests ensure there are no issues with your brake-pad installation, gives you confidence when driving on main streets and helps "seat" the brake pads into place.
  15. Listen for problems - When testing, if you should hear a grinding sound such as metal on metal, you probably have the brake pads reversed (i.e., the inside surface incorrectly facing out). This should be corrected immediately. Note that the new brake pads may squeak a little bit until they are completely broken in.

on May 03, 2010 | Hyundai Elantra Cars & Trucks

Tip

How to replace worn out brake pads.


Tools you may need: New Brake Pads, Jack and Jack Stands, Lug Wrench, Large Phillips Head Screwdriver, Dead Blow Hammer, Open End or Ratchet Wrench Set, C-Clamp; Optional tools: Open end or adjustable wrench, Allen wrenches, hammer, small bungee cord.
Most important, BE SAFE Safety needs to be the most important part of your project. You'll be taking the wheel off so be sure you have your car jacked up and resting securely on jack stands.
Next : Preparation
Make sure you've got everything ready to go before you start this project. Go ahead and break the lugs before you jack it up. It's much easier and safer with the wheel on the ground.
Never work on a car which is supported by a jack only! You may need to replace your brake discs depending on the amount of wear they have endured.
Remove them from the bottom up, leaving the top lug nut for last. This keeps the wheel in place while you remove the rest of them and makes it easier to catch the wheel once you remove the last top nut.I remember one night my daughter called me in a panic,“Dad we had a flat, now we can't get the wheel off, what do we do?”If you remove the lugs and still can't get the wheel off, try this stuck wheel trick.
Reinstall the lug nuts them leaving about 5 turns before they start to get snug. Now lower the car to the ground, get in and start it up. Drive back and forth 4 or 5 feet a few times. Now jack the car up and test the wheel. It should be nice and loose now.
On most cars, the next step is to remove the brake caliper to access the pads.On the back of the caliper you'll find 2 bolts. It will either be a hex bolt or an Allen bolt.Remove these two bolts and put them aside.
Hold the caliper from the top and pull upward, wiggling it around to loosen it up. If it's stubborn,give it a few taps with a hammer to loosen it a bit. Pull it up and slightly away, being sure not to put any stress on the brake line.
If there is a place to safely set the caliper back there, do it. If not, you'll need to take your bungeecord and hang the caliper from something, the coil spring is a good spot.Don't let the caliper hang by the brake line, it can damage the line, causing a tear, which may leak.Before you pull out the old brake pads, take a second to observe how everything is in installed. If there are little metal clips around the brake pads, note how they are in there so you can getit right when you put things back together. Take a digital picture of the whole assembly, so you do not forget.With the caliper out of the way, the brake pads should slide right out, they may have little metal tabs holding the pads on the brake calipers pistons.While you're here, it might be a good idea to inspect your brake discs, looking for deep groves.As your brake pads wear out, the caliper pistons will push out of the caliper itself to keep the pads close to the rotor or self adjust, so that you will have quick brakes throughout the life of the pads. Now the pistons are adjusted to match the worn out pads. You will need to push the piston back into caliper housing.Take the c-clamp or a caliper tool and place the end with the screw on it against the piston with the other end of the clamp. Now tighten the clamp until the piston is in far enough that you can easily put the caliper with the new pads over the rotor. Once back together, you can put a little grease on the caliper mounting bolts and replace the bolts. Press the brake pedal a few times to make sure you have solid brake pressure, but remember you will have to start the car up to bring up the vacuum assist, so they will feel like you are used too. The first pump or two will be soft as the piston moves to adjust to the new pads. Put your wheel back on, tighten all of the lug bolts.

on Jan 28, 2010 | Chevrolet Impala Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Replace rear brake discs and pads


Depending on vehicle. Find level ground and park there. Put chocks in front and behind wheels not being lifted. Loosen lugs, jack up vehicle, set jack stands, lower vehicle on jack stands, remove lugs and wheel. Open hood remove brake fluid cap. Remove two bolts holding caliper, pull caliper off rotor disc and bracket, remove pads, place a used pad in front of caliper piston, use a c clamp to push caliper piston in caliper, remove c clamp and old pad, hang caliper up, remove 2 bolts holding caliper bracket, remove bracket, remove rotor, install new rotor, install caliper bracket, install new pads, install caliper, repeat this on other side, put cap back on brake fluid tank, remove bleeder fittings and keep pressing brake pedal until an even flow of brake fluid sprays out. Install bleeder fitting. Make sure brake fluid doesnt get on paint and is contained and disposed of correctly, top off fluid install wheels and raise car up remove jack stands, lower car and break in new pads

Nov 06, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Was seeing how hard the brakes were to do on a hyundai 2005 tuscon gls (Middle package) if u have tools needed and directions i would really appreciate it


Tools you may need: New Brake Pads, Jack and Jack Stands, Lug Wrench, Large Phillips Head Screwdriver, Dead Blow Hammer, Open End or Ratchet Wrench Set, C-Clamp; Optional tools: Open end or adjustable wrench, Allen wrenches, hammer, small bungee cord.
Most important, BE SAFE Safety needs to be the most important part of your project. You'll be taking the wheel off so be sure you have your car jacked up and resting securely on jack stands.
Next : Preparation
Make sure you've got everything ready to go before you start this project. Go ahead and break the lugs before you jack it up. It's much easier and safer with the wheel on the ground.
Never work on a car which is supported by a jack only! You may need to replace your brake discs depending on the amount of wear they have endured.
Remove them from the bottom up, leaving the top lug nut for last. This keeps the wheel in place while you remove the rest of them and makes it easier to catch the wheel once you remove the last top nut.I remember one night my daughter called me in a panic,?Dad we had a flat, now we can't get the wheel off, what do we do??If you remove the lugs and still can't get the wheel off, try this stuck wheel trick.
Reinstall the lug nuts them leaving about 5 turns before they start to get snug. Now lower the car to the ground, get in and start it up. Drive back and forth 4 or 5 feet a few times. Now jack the car up and test the wheel. It should be nice and loose now.
On most cars, the next step is to remove the brake caliper to access the pads.On the back of the caliper you'll find 2 bolts. It will either be a hex bolt or an Allen bolt.Remove these two bolts and put them aside.
Hold the caliper from the top and pull upward, wiggling it around to loosen it up. If it's stubborn,give it a few taps with a hammer to loosen it a bit. Pull it up and slightly away, being sure not to put any stress on the brake line.
If there is a place to safely set the caliper back there, do it. If not, you'll need to take your bungeecord and hang the caliper from something, the coil spring is a good spot.Don't let the caliper hang by the brake line, it can damage the line, causing a tear, which may leak.Before you pull out the old brake pads, take a second to observe how everything is in installed. If there are little metal clips around the brake pads, note how they are in there so you can getit right when you put things back together. Take a digital picture of the whole assembly, so you do not forget.With the caliper out of the way, the brake pads should slide right out, they may have little metal tabs holding the pads on the brake calipers pistons.While you're here, it might be a good idea to inspect your brake discs, looking for deep groves.As your brake pads wear out, the caliper pistons will push out of the caliper itself to keep the pads close to the rotor or self adjust, so that you will have quick brakes throughout the life of the pads. Now the pistons are adjusted to match the worn out pads. You will need to push the piston back into caliper housing.Take the c-clamp or a caliper tool and place the end with the screw on it against the piston with the other end of the clamp. Now tighten the clamp until the piston is in far enough that you can easily put the caliper with the new pads over the rotor. Once back together, you can put a little grease on the caliper mounting bolts and replace the bolts.Press the brake pedal a few times to make sure you have solid brake pressure, but remember you will have to start the car up to bring up the vacuum assist, so they will feel like you are used too. The first pump or two will be soft as the piston moves to adjust to the new pads. Put your wheel back on, tighten all of the lug bolts.

Sep 13, 2011 | 2005 Hyundai Tucson

1 Answer

How to change the front brakes on a plymouth breeze


jack up car, put jack stands under car, remove front wheels. compress calipers by inserting a flat pry bar between inside pad and rotor. remove caliper pins (either 7mm hex head or 10mm wrench). take off old pads . install new pads and caliper pins and wheels. pump brake pedal until pedal becomes firm, then lower car off of jack stands.

Jul 17, 2011 | 1999 Plymouth Breeze

2 Answers

04 lincoln navigator, Air ride problem. Driverside front and rear bags appear fully inflated. The passenger side looks normal height. When I shut the truck off driverside stays jacked up and passenger side...


My suggestion to you and all the other folks leaving questions on this board about collapsed air suspension systems in luxury cars is to fix that one by replacing it with a real spring and shock system which you can buy at www.strutmasters.com if it is economically feasible, then sell it and avoid air suspensions systems like the plague. There are legions of old 70s Citroens still sitting idle 30 years later on collapsed air suspensions systems in garages and barns all over the country which cars the buyers can't let go because they cost so damn much. Get a coleman air mattress and use it every day, see how long it really lasts.

Dec 12, 2010 | Lincoln Navigator Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

FRONT WHEEL SQUEAKS IN COLD WEATHER BUT SQUEAK DISAPPEARS WHEN CAR HAS BEEN DRIVING FOR 10 MINS. JUST HAD NEW BRAKES 8 MONTH AGO?


OK, this unfortunately is a comon problem and one that I try to remedy when I put new brakes onto my customers cars.........you see the edges of the brake pads are sahrp, and they are "designed" to crumble away as the pad wears, but if you purchase hard-compound brakes, which last longer I might add, this material doesnt break away and you get squeaking.......

What needs to be done is "chamfering" of the pads...which means they need to be removed and the edges are sanded/grinded away so the sharp 90 degree angles are 45 degree angles...this is the best solution that I have found.....

Dec 02, 2010 | 2002 Oldsmobile Alero

2 Answers

Airbag locations


In the steering wheel and passenger side dash.Due to the age of the vehicle probably doesn't have the curtain "side" airbags.The airbags were designed primarily for head on collisions. Here is some useful information to why the may have not deployed courtesy of http://www.asashop.org/autoinc/dec2001/collision.htm
How Air Bags Work To have a frontal (driver or passenger) air bag deploy, certain criteria must be met. One of these criteria is that the frontal impact must be within a 60-degree window, occurring within 30 degrees from the vehicle's centerline. Another key element is that the crash forces are equivalent to a head-on collision with an immovable barrier at 10-15 miles per hour. Because a typical automobile accident only lasts about 0.125 (1/8th) of a second, air bags deploy within 15 to 20ms after the initial crash impact. To create a protective cushion between the occupant and the vehicle's interior, the air bag inflates at speeds up to 200 mph within approximately 30ms after impact. This allows the occupant to contact a fully inflated bag within approximately 45 to 50ms after the initial crash impact. Approximately 100ms after impact the bag deflates.

May 30, 2010 | 2001 Buick LeSabre

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