Question about 2004 Nissan Altima

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2004 Nissan altima 2.5 liter Crankshaft Position Sensor

Approxiamately where is the cransk shaft position sensor located and is it a sensor that can be replaced in my garage?

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  • Anonymous Dec 14, 2008

    I have a 1995 Jeep Wrangler with a 2.5 four cylinder engine.

    The darn thing wont start. It cranks over with no problems, but It wont fire.
    I tested the coil and its fine.
    The coil ohms out at 1.1 from pin to pin.
    It ohms out 11.2 from pin to lug.
    I changed the spark plug wire and still had the same result.
    I changed all of my relays as well.

    I'm looking for the crank position switch but having no luck in finding it.
    I have seen that many people out there are having this same problem.


  • Anonymous Mar 27, 2009

    I have a 2004 Nissian Altima and it has started dying on me. What might the problem be and how can it be fixed?

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Yes, the sensor can be replaced in your garage (if you have some decent auto repair experience).
This is not an easy job due to the location of the crank sensor.

Below are the steps I used to replace the crankshaft position sensor.
The steps are for a 2004 Nissan Altima with a 2.5 liter engine.

Nissan has a crank and cam sensor kit. I would not buy any aftermarket sensors because of the effort required to replace the sensors. (I do not work for Nissan). The information below is compiled of tips I found on the internet and my own experience. Even though these procedures may appear lengthy, it took me much longer to figure out the correct steps involved for this task.
Even though I have included all of the steps (and hints) I used… THIS IS NOT AN EASY JOB FOR THE “DO IT YOURSELFER”

CRANK SENSOR IS LOCATED AT FIRE WALL SIDE OF BLOCK BETWEEN MOTOR MOUNT AND FLYWHEEL. YOU GET TO IT FROM TOP.
Remove the (4) allen head bolts that hold the plastic engine cover. Remove the air tube that connects the throttle chamber to air filter box. Pull off the valve cover breather hose with the air tube. Now place a drop light under the two rubber heater hoses (at the firewall on the drivers hand side), shining the light forward towards the back side of the block (below the intake runners). To see the crankshaft sensor and connector, look between the valve cover and the throttle chambers (intake runners) on the drivers side, look straight down toward the ground… look for the sensor with a black wire connector with a green tab on the side, held to the engine block with a gold colored 10mm hex headed bolt. You will need to view the sensor from this position as you are following the steps below to remove and install the crank sensor. There is a large wiring harness bracket attached to the transmission bell housing that was temporarily unbolted to aid with the removal and installation of the crank sensor.

What turned out to be the biggest problem was the connector securing the wiring harness to the sensor. Unlike the camshaft position sensor connector that is removed by squeezing in on a tab located at the top of the connector, the crank position sensor was secured to the harness via some green colored push button assembly. To remove the crank sensor connector, the green tab must depressed ALL THE WAY DOWN (towards the block) UNTIL THE GREEN TAB LOCKS INTO PLACE - REMAINING IN A “PUSHED IN” POSITION (You should hear a “click”). I was able to accomplish this by viewing the connector as described above and at the same time, reach around the back side of the engine using a 6” – 8” flat blade screw driver (with a large head) and push the green tab in towards the block until it locked into place. After the green tab was depressed and locked, (still viewing from above) I repositioned my hand holding a smaller flat blade screw driver to gently pry the connector off the sensor inserting the blade of the screw driver between the bottom of the connector and the crank sensor (a slight twist should do it). I do not recommend pulling on the connector wires or trying to pull the connector off with pliers as damage may result - because in my world of auto repair, if there is a chance that something will break because I am not careful… IT WILL BREAK! After you have removed the connector and while viewing from above, use a ¼” drive ratchet with a 6” extension and a 10mm socket to loosen the gold bolt holding the crank sensor in place. I recommend that you loosen the bolt with the socket, then reach your hand around to the connector and remove the bolt by hand. After the bolt is removed, use an 8” slip jaw pliers - set at its widest opening setting – to grab the sensor. First twist then pull out the sensor.

Be sure to clean the inside of the sensor’s wiring connector with break cleaner spray and blow out with compressed air to get rid of any oil that may have leaked into the connector from the defective crank sensor… this is what probably caused the trouble code in the first place.

You are now ready to install the new crank sensor. If you purchased the crank and cam sensor kit from Nissan, make sure that sensor with white dot at bolt whole goes to the crank. Be sure to oil the rubber “O” ring. I was not able to get the green tab on the connector to snap back into place while the new sensor was installed in the block. I installed the connector to the sensor while it was out of the block – the green tab still did not pop back into its original position on its own – so…while the connector was installed as far down as I could push it, it used a small flat blade screw driver to push on the bottom of the green tab towards the top. That did the trick. While viewing from above, I placed the crank sensor back into the block. I was not able to get the rubber “O” ring to seat within the block by hand. I used the gold bolt to draw the sensor in while slowly tightening. HINT: I taped the outside of the washer of the crank sensor bolt to the 10mm socket to hold the bolt on place while I inserted the bolt into the block… you can do this by hand, but I didn’t want to drop the bolt . I also taped the socket to the ratchet extension so the socket would not get stuck on the bolt (it’s a snug fit down there).
If you were able to accomplish the above procedures, the cam sensor is a snap to remove in install. It is located in the driver’s side portion of the head facing the wheel.
Remember to reinstall all brackets and items that were removed.
Good luck!

Posted on Feb 17, 2009

  • krillin899 Feb 19, 2011

    Thanks so much for posting this, i was having such a hard time disconnecting the plug on the crank shaft because i thought that it was the same connector as the cam shaft. Once i found out that it was different it wasnt that bad. Thanks again

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Take it to the dealer, there is a recall. Call Nissan at 1800nissan1 to verify.

Posted on Nov 26, 2008

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I just followed the above procrdure changed my sensor succesfully.
The last step: not need to reset the green tab.
after you installed the sansor back, you put the connector on and push it fully down towards the engine direction, the green tab will automatically spring back to the original position, and ready for next time remove.
Trick: before remove or before install the connector, spray WD40 a little bit will help you to disconnect the connector (easy the green tab push down and spring back).

Posted on Jun 19, 2009

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The solution from mike223 was very descriptive and helpful - thanks! I think i spent as much time locating the sensor as i did replacing it. I did not find it necessary to remove any bracketry to access the sensor; i used a 3/8 ratchet with a 6" extension, and loosened the sensor attachment bolt nearly all the way out, then finished the removal with a telescoping magnetic retrieval tool, which proved to be very handy when reinstalling the bolt in the new sensor. I also found that that the connector clocking on my replacement sensor was 180 degrees from the original - took a few tries to connect before i figured out that it was reversed. I would say that this job is easy to only moderately difficult for the do-it-yourselfer - i completed the job in less than an hour total. Good luck!

Posted on Apr 16, 2010

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It's absolutely possible to do it yourself. Here is a video tutorial how to locate and replace Crankshaft Positioning Sensor on Nissan Altima:
http://youtu.be/325s0pFQZtg
Code P0725 P0335 P0340 Crankshaft Positioning Sensor Replacement DIY Nissan

Posted on Feb 13, 2015

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