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Glow plugs WHERE ARE THE GLOW PLUGS LOCATED ON A 2.0L 4-4D ENGINE

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Gasoline engines dont use glow plugs. glow plugs are for diesel engines some people call glow plugs as heater plugs, but well, if you are refering to a toyota corolla, then you must have been refering to the SPARK PLUGS. trace the four long wires(high tension wires) that goes to the engine, pull the rubber boot and you will see the spark plugs, its kinda deep though so you will need a flashlight.

Posted on Oct 20, 2008

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Glow plug relay


81418784532&item=281418784532">G1900 Kubota, the glow plugs are energized when the keyswitch is moved halfway to the start position. Also the glow plug indicator light is illuminated when in this position. I hold the key in that position until the glow plug light goes out, and then crank the engine. On really cold days I repeat the glow plug cycle several times before cranking.

Jan 03, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

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The diagram in my haynes manual does not show some parts that are in my 2001 jetta tdi 1.9 turbo. i ran a diognostic and it says glow plug curcuit a malfunction, i changed the plugs and tested the coolant...


In addition to the 4 primary glow plugs, the cooling system also has 3 Coolant Glow Plugs to help provide extra heat to the cooling system in order to warm-up the vehicle's interior more quickly, and enhance overall engine warm-up time. (Example - Some Mercedes diesel engines use electrical heaters in the cabin because their engine is so thermally efficient.)
Likewise, this auxiliary source of heat from the 3 Coolant Glow Plugs is necessary because of the VW 1.9 TDI engines outstanding efficiency, which wastes very little heat.


The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs are located at the end of the aluminum cylinder head (in a protruding flange) directly below the vacuum (brake booster) pump, which also connects to a coolant hose.

tdisline_301.jpg
The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs use two (underhood) relays which are monitored and controlled by the ECU. During a cold start, the vehicle's interior temperature selector switch helps the ECU choose one of three modes depending on the amount of heat required to warm-up the coolant.

For example, Coolant Glow Plug #1 can be selected to operate all by itself, or #2 and #3 can operate together as a two-some, or lastly, all three glow plugs can form a triple source of heat for maximum enhancement of engine warm-up time.

After the engine is completely warmed up and the thermostat is open, the Coolant Glow Plugs normally shut-off and remain off unless the (thermally efficent) engine cools down sufficiently to have the computer signal them to come back on to keep the engine and cabin air warm. Extensive idling times at stop lights or in the driveway are scenarios where these glow plugs are most likely to recycle on and off.

In conclusion, the period of Preglow and Afterglow is determined by the engine's coolant temperature (during a cold or hot start), which helps the ECU select a predetermined time-cycle for the combustion chamber and / or Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs to follow.

Finally, one myth that needs to be immediately debunked, is the belief that the TDI's advanced Glow Plug System is linked to the opening of the driver's side door, which is false! It is also noteworthy to mention that some earlier VW diesel glow plug systems were operated in this manner, but not so with the advanced VW Jetta 1.9 TDI engine.

Feb 23, 2011 | Volkswagen Jetta Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 2000 Jetta diesel. Can you tell me where the plug for the block heater is? If indeed there is one.


In addition to the 4 primary glow plugs, the cooling system also has 3 Coolant Glow Plugs to help provide extra heat to the cooling system in order to warm-up the vehicle's interior more quickly, and enhance overall engine warm-up time. (Example - Some Mercedes diesel engines use electrical heaters in the cabin because their engine is so thermally efficient.)
Likewise, this auxiliary source of heat from the 3 Coolant Glow Plugs is necessary because of the VW 1.9 TDI engines outstanding efficiency, which wastes very little heat.


The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs are located at the end of the aluminum cylinder head (in a protruding flange) directly below the vacuum (brake booster) pump, which also connects to a coolant hose.

tdisline_180.jpg


The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs use two (underhood) relays which are monitored and controlled by the ECU. During a cold start, the vehicle's interior temperature selector switch helps the ECU choose one of three modes depending on the amount of heat required to warm-up the coolant.

For example, Coolant Glow Plug #1 can be selected to operate all by itself, or #2 and #3 can operate together as a two-some, or lastly, all three glow plugs can form a triple source of heat for maximum enhancement of engine warm-up time.

After the engine is completely warmed up and the thermostat is open, the Coolant Glow Plugs normally shut-off and remain off unless the (thermally efficent) engine cools down sufficiently to have the computer signal them to come back on to keep the engine and cabin air warm. Extensive idling times at stop lights or in the driveway are scenarios where these glow plugs are most likely to recycle on and off.

In conclusion, the period of Preglow and Afterglow is determined by the engine's coolant temperature (during a cold or hot start), which helps the ECU select a predetermined time-cycle for the combustion chamber and / or Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs to follow.

Finally, one myth that needs to be immediately debunked, is the belief that the TDI's advanced Glow Plug System is linked to the opening of the driver's side door, which is false! It is also noteworthy to mention that some earlier VW diesel glow plug systems were operated in this manner, but not so with the advanced VW Jetta 1.9 TDI engine.




Please do rate my response. Thanks!

Jan 23, 2011 | 2000 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

1 Answer

Where are the three glow plugs that are used for the heater/cooling located on an 02 vw jetta 1.9L tdi?


In addition to the 4 primary glow plugs, the cooling system also has 3 Coolant Glow Plugs to help provide extra heat to the cooling system in order to warm-up the vehicle's interior more quickly, and enhance overall engine warm-up time. (Example - Some Mercedes diesel engines use electrical heaters in the cabin because their engine is so thermally efficient.)
Likewise, this auxiliary source of heat from the 3 Coolant Glow Plugs is necessary because of the VW 1.9 TDI engines outstanding efficiency, which wastes very little heat.


The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs are located at the end of the aluminum cylinder head (in a protruding flange) directly below the vacuum (brake booster) pump, which also connects to a coolant hose.

tdisline_102.jpg
The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs use two (underhood) relays which are monitored and controlled by the ECU. During a cold start, the vehicle's interior temperature selector switch helps the ECU choose one of three modes depending on the amount of heat required to warm-up the coolant.

For example, Coolant Glow Plug #1 can be selected to operate all by itself, or #2 and #3 can operate together as a two-some, or lastly, all three glow plugs can form a triple source of heat for maximum enhancement of engine warm-up time.

After the engine is completely warmed up and the thermostat is open, the Coolant Glow Plugs normally shut-off and remain off unless the (thermally efficent) engine cools down sufficiently to have the computer signal them to come back on to keep the engine and cabin air warm. Extensive idling times at stop lights or in the driveway are scenarios where these glow plugs are most likely to recycle on and off.

In conclusion, the period of Preglow and Afterglow is determined by the engine's coolant temperature (during a cold or hot start), which helps the ECU select a predetermined time-cycle for the combustion chamber and / or Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs to follow.

Finally, one myth that needs to be immediately debunked, is the belief that the TDI's advanced Glow Plug System is linked to the opening of the driver's side door, which is false! It is also noteworthy to mention that some earlier VW diesel glow plug systems were operated in this manner, but not so with the advanced VW Jetta 1.9 TDI engine.

Dec 16, 2010 | 2002 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

1 Answer

1997 Jetta: glow plugs not working. Glow plugs tested good, ne...


Before you invest in a long drawn out Glow Plug replacement etc. A little known issue occurs on the ALH TDI engines. The temperature sensor sending unit. A small blue module that plugs into the coolant hose assembly will cause a P error on the glow plugs that is nothing to do with the glow plugs at all. The part fails and sends a temp error to the engine computer. I tested all the coolant glow plugs, engine glow plugs and glow plug harness and all worked fine. One of the test procedures for the glow plugs is to undo this sensor that will force the glow plugs to come on no matter what temperature. This confirmed my GP system was functional and the sensor was bad. I purchased the part from local VW dealer for $33 US and installed and it is fine. Dependent on your model it can be square or round. The link to this part for your car is http://www.partsgeek.com/catalog/1997/volkswagen/jetta/body_electrical/water_temperature_sender.html

Be sure to have VW Pentosin coolant on hand to refill coolant system as you will lose quite a bit when removing this part. It is located slightly behind the coolant glow plug assembly.. This is the round ones not the ones on the engine block at top.

Be sure that when you replace it you put in a new rubber gasket seal.. its a round rubber seal that should come with your new part. Dont reuse the old one or you will have a leak.

There is a c-clip that holds this in the hole you slide that clip off and wiggle the sensor out. Coolant will run out of the hole, so do this outside. The sensor is easily pulled out. You will need to insert the new part in teh same hole with new rubber gasket and replace c clip. Then plug in wiring harness and you should be good to go.

May 17, 2010 | 1997 Volkswagen Jetta

2 Answers

Where are the glow plugs located on 96powerstroke


in teh cylinder head next to the injectors

Dec 24, 2009 | 1997 Ford F250 SuperCab

1 Answer

My 2004 f250 after it sits it wont start. the wait to start light only comes on for bout1 to 2 sec. the only way i start it is to plug it up at night what is my problem.


The wait to start light always comes on for at least 1 sec, if it goes off early it must think the engine is warm.

My guess is you have a faulty engine oil temp sensor that is telling the pcm that it is already warm. The only way to know for sure is to read the info with a scan tool.

Glow Plug System: Description and Operation
GLOW PLUG SYSTEM
The 6.0L diesel engine uses a glow plug system that preheats air in the combustion chamber to improve cold engine starting.
The system consists of:
- glow plugs.
- glow plug control module.
- powertrain control module (PCM).
- engine oil temperature (EOT) sensor.
- barometric pressure sensor (BARO sensor).
The glow plug monitor system is part of the On-Board Diagnostics II (OBD II) System.
The glow plug system is electronically controlled by the powertrain control module. If the oil temperature is below 55°C (131°F) the powertrain
control module will energize the glow plugs immediately after the key is placed in the ON position. Then, depending on the readings from the engine
oil temperature (EOT) sensor and the barometric pressure (BARO) sensor, the powertrain control module determines how long the glow plugs will be
on.
The glow plugs are located in the cylinder heads, under the glow plug buss bar.
The glow plugs are self-regulating. If the engine oil temperature is above 55°C (131°F), the powertrain control module will bulb-check the WAIT TO
START lamp but not energize the glow plug relay.
The glow plug ON time varies from 0-120 seconds depending on battery voltage, engine oil temperature and barometric pressure.
The glow plug control monitor (GPCM) system is designed to find failed glow plugs or failed wiring in the glow plug system.

Oct 30, 2009 | 2004 Ford F250

1 Answer

Glow plugs causing starting problem


if you need connectors and terminals for the glow plug connections under the valve cover, Ford sells then so you don't need a whole $600 harness.

info for your use

Section 03-07B: Glow Plug System 1996 F-250, F-350, F-Super Duty Equipped with 7.3L Diesel Engines Workshop Manual
DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION Glow Plug System The 7.3L diesel engine uses a glow plug system which preheats air in the combustion chamber to improve cold engine starting. The system consists of eight glow plugs, the glow plug control module (12B533), powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650), engine oil temperature (EOT) sensor and barometric pressure sensor (BARO sensor) (12A644). The glow plug system is electronically controlled by the powertrain control module. The powertrain control module energizes the glow plugs immediately after the key is placed in the ON position and then determines how long the glow plugs will be on according to the engine oil temperature and the barometric pressure. The required time for the glow plugs to be energized decreases as the engine oil temperature and barometric pressure increase. The glow plugs are self-regulating, and the powertrain control module controls relay ON time. The powertrain control module protects the glow plugs by energizing them for short durations if the battery voltage is abnormally high.

Possible Causes: Insufficient glow plug ON time will not allow enough heat to accumulate in the combustion chamber to easily facilitate starting. If the glow plug system ON time does not meet any of the specifications in the accompanying chart the problem is most likely a faulty wire harness connection, ground connections or glow plug relay.

If the glow plug resistance to ground is high, the most likely causes are an open UVC (under valve cover) harness or open glow plug.
--------------------------------------------------------
Relay Operation
Install a DVOM on the glow plug feed side of the glow plug relay (large stud with two wires connected). Turn the ignition key to the ON position but do not attempt to start. Note the time in seconds from when the key is turned on and the glow plug relay energizes until the glow plug relay de-energizes. The glow plug relay makes a loud click noise which is easily heard when it energizes and de-energizes. The dome light will dim and the dash voltmeter will dip when the glow plugs are drawing current from the battery. Compare the times measured to the table (time will be affected by engine temperature, battery condition and vehicle altitude). The voltage at the glow plug feed terminal may vary from 9 to 12 volts depending upon battery condition.
--------------------------------------

-----
If battery voltage not present check for B+ at power supply terminal (terminal with single large wire). Power for glow plug power supply is supplied from starter relay through two fusible links at solenoid.
Glow Plug Operation
Disconnect all of the glow plug/injector harness connectors from the valve cover gaskets. With the pigtail installed, measure glow plug resistance to ground (preferably B-). A resistance measurement of .1 to 6 ohms indicates a good glow plug.



Glow Plug Harness Continuity
Measure for continuity from the connector harness to the glow plug feed terminal on the glow plug relay. Resistance should be less than 5 ohms.
Incorrect measurements will result if all glow plug/injector connectors to valve cover are not disconnected.

---------------------------------------------------
Glow Plug Relay The glow plug relay (12A343) has a plastic base and two mounting bolts. It is operated by the powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650) which senses engine oil temperature, PCM voltage and barometric pressure. When the engine oil temperature or the barometric pressure is low, the PCM activates the glow plug relay and the glow plugs. If the PCM voltage is too high, the powertrain control module deactivates the glow plug relay and the glow plugs immediately energize for a shorter duration, decreasing the modulation of the duty cycle.
-----------------------------------------------
Glow Plug Removal
  1. stj~us~en~file=ani_caut.gif~gen~ref.gif WARNING: THE RED-STRIPED WIRING HARNESS CARRIES 115V DC. SEVERE ELECTRICAL SHOCK MAY BE RECEIVED. DO NOT PIERCE.
    Remove valve cover (6582). Refer to Section 03-01D .
  1. Disconnect glow plug electrical connector using a pair of pliers.
  1. Remove glow plug using 10mm socket.
  1. Clean and inspect glow plug tip for damage. Replace if damaged.
Installation
  1. Install glow plug and tighten to 19 Nm (14 lb-ft).
  1. Connect glow plug electrical connector. Make sure glow plug wiring is routed to avoid moving parts.
--------------------------------------------------------------
Glow Plug Control Glow plugs are used to warm the cylinders to improve cold-engine starting. The PCM uses the engine oil temperature (EOT) sensor and barometric pressure (BARO) sensor to determine how long the glow plugs will be on. The PCM energizes the glow plugs longer if the engine is very cold or if the barometric pressure is low at high altitudes.
The PCM controls the relay that supplies power to the glow plugs with the glow plug control (GPC) signal. When the GPC signal is grounded by the PCM the relay closes, turning the glow plugs on.
The glow plugs are controlled by the following sequence:
  1. PCM energizes the glow plugs.
  1. The PCM energizes the glow plugs immediately after the ignition is placed in the ON position.
  1. The PCM then determines how long glow plugs will be on based on EOT sensor and the BARO sensor. The required time to warm up the cylinder decreases the engine oil temperature and barometric pressure increases at low altitudes.
Glow Plug Lamp Control The glow plug lamp (GPL) signal controls the WAIT TO START light located on the instrument panel. This light is used to indicate when to start the engine. The cylinders are being warmed by the glow plugs during and after this light is lit. The PCM energizes the glow plug lamp longer if the engine is very cold or if the barometric pressure is low.
When the GPL signal is brought low, the "Wait to Start" lamp is turned on.
The glow plug lamp is controlled by the following sequence:
  1. PCM lights the WAIT TO START light after a key on reset occurs.
The PCM determines the glow plug lamp activation time based on engine oil temperature, barometric pressure and battery voltage.
  1. PCM turns off the WAIT TO START light.
The glow plug lamp is turned off when the timer counts to the number of seconds specified by the PCM. The glow plugs will normally remain on longer than the "Wait to Start" lamp.
-----------------------------------

Mar 14, 2009 | 2004 Ford F350

1 Answer

Glow PLugs and Relays


Good Day
The glow plug relays are located on the right front shock tower. Remove the cover and you will see two relays If I remember I think they are round, but not sure.

Please let me know how you make out and if there is anything else that I might be able to help you with.

Cheers

Sep 17, 2008 | 1985 Chevrolet Chevette

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