Question about 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera

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Oil appears in the coolant reservoir bottle

I was advised that the heat exchanger oilo cooler needs new seales. I am unable to locate the iol cooler. Please I need the location and instructions to replace these. NOTE We do not have a porsche service or dealer on the island, hence my request.

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Hi,

To my knowledge, most oil coolers would be In Front Right Fender for 1995-1998 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 and would look something like the image below.
Oil appears in the coolant reservoir bottle - 966b111.jpg
Although I have strong doubts that your seals are needing replacement. Should they be worn out, defective oil seals would exhibit leaks that would be noticeable. Nonetheless, if you would follow the two hoses connected to the oil cooler, they would lead you right back to their entrance and exit points in the engine.

Oil mixing with the coolant and visible in the coolant reservoir indicates another problem, most probably head gasket.

Hope this be of initial help/idea. Pls post back how things turned up or should you need additional information.

Good luck and kind regards. Thank you for using FixYa.

Posted on Oct 12, 2008

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How to replace oil; cooler on this year


  • Service and Repair
Oil Cooler Replacement

Removal Procedure

  1. Raise and support the vehicle. Refer to Vehicle Lifting.
  2. Drain the engine oil and remove the oil filter housing.
89116492

  1. Loosen the oil cooler outlet (1) and the inlet (2) lines from the engine block.
  2. Lower the vehicle.
  3. Remove the intake plenum.
  4. Remove the intake manifold.
89116493

  1. Disconnect the following electrical connectors from the water crossover:
    • The engine coolant temperature sender (2)
    • The engine coolant temperature sensor (4)
84936658

  1. Remove the water crossover bolts (1).
  2. Remove the water crossover upper and lower seals (2).
84942881

  1. Loosen the upper heat shield bolts on the left side of the exhaust manifold.
89116496

  1. Remove the oil cooler outlet line from the engine oil cooler.
  2. Remove the oil cooler inlet line from the engine oil cooler.
84942883

  1. Note the positioning of the 4 seals.
84972057

  1. Position the oil feed and return,lines out of the way and secure with mechanic wire.
  2. Remove the engine oil cooler, inlet and outlet nuts (1).
  3. Remove the engine oil cooler cover bolts (2).
84942883

  1. Remove the engine oil cooler cover.
  2. Remove the engine oil cooler.
  3. Clean all sealing surfaces.
Installation Procedure
84972056

  1. Install the engine oil cooler.
  2. Apply a 2 mm (0.08 inch) bead of RTV silicone sealant, GM P/N 12346240, in the groove around the engine oil cooler cover.
  3. Install the engine oil cooler cover.
Notice: Refer to Fastener Notice in Service Precautions.
84972057

  1. Install the engine oil cooler cover bolts (2). Tighten the engine oil cooler cover bolts to 30 Nm (22 ft. lbs.).
  2. Install the engine oil cooler inlet and outlet nuts (1). Tighten the engine oil cooler inlet and outlet nuts to 20 Nm (15 ft. lbs.).
  3. Reposition the oil feed and return lines.
84942883

  1. Install the oil cooler outlet and install the oil cooler inlet lines to the engine oil cooler. Use 4 new seals.
Tighten the oil feed and return lines to 30 Nm (22 ft. lbs.).
84936658

  1. Install the water crossover:
    • Position the crossover.
    • Install the upper and lower seals (2).
    • Install the water crossover bolts (1). Tighten
Tighten the water crossover bolts to 30 Nm (22 ft. lbs.).
  1. Connect the electrical connectors at the following locations:
    • The engine coolant temperature sensor (4)
    • The engine coolant temperature sender (2)
  1. Install the intake manifold.
  2. Install the intake plenum.
  3. Raise the vehicle.
89116492

  1. Install the oil cooler outlet (1) line to the engine block. Tighten the oil cooler outlet (1) line to 30 Nm (22 ft. lbs.).
  2. Install the oil cooler inlet (2) line to the engine block. Tighten the oil cooler inlet (2) line to 30 Nm (22 ft. lbs.).
  3. Install the oil filter housing to the engine block. Tighten the oil filter housing to 45 Nm (33 ft. lbs.).
  4. Lower the vehicle.

Dec 22, 2014 | 2001 Cadillac Catera

Tip

How to check you Volkswagen & Audi oil cooler for leaks.


If you own a Volkswagen or Audi and have coolant in your engine oil or oil in your coolant you may have a failing oil cooler. This may have been misdiagnosed as a bad head gasket.

Before spending hundreds or thousands repairing a head gasket that may not be the problem you can perform this relatively easy check of your oil cooler which is a common problem on many Volks/Audi models that use oil filter type of oil cooler. This type of cooler is located between the oil filter and the engine block. The oil filter screws onto the oil cooler. It has two rubber coolant hoses attached to it and is made from aluminum.

The oil cooler works by passing engine oil through the body of the cooler. The engine oil passes over what resembles a radiator inside the cooler. This 'mini radiator' is passing engine coolant in through one of the hoses and out through the other. When working properly the oil and coolant is kept separated. Over time the passages inside the cooler can corrode and the oil and engine coolant inside can mix. This can lead to coolant in your engine oil (which may produce a milky substance on the inside of the oil filler cap) or oil in the coolant (which you may be able to see in the coolant reservoir as a dark ring or oily film).

To test your cooler for leaks you will need a few basic tools and about 3 hour of your time. (To allow for the engine to cool)

-Basic ratchet set and set of screwdrivers.

-One straight 5/8 inch plastic heater hose connector. You can find thisat most auto parts or plumbing supply stores. Cost about $1.

-A pan to catch some coolant that will spill.

This procedure is best done on a lift but can be done using jack stands as well. This MUST be done with a cool engine to avoid burns from coolant.

-Lift or jack the front end of the car. (If you don't know how to safely jack a car onto jack stands, DO NOT proceed any further. Take the car to your repair shop and have them follow these instructions)

-Remove the plastic cover under the front of the car (if your model has this) to expose the oil filter. The oil filter is a cylindrical part that sticks out from the side of the engine.

-The oil filter is screwed into the oil cooler. You will see two rubber hoses connected to the oil cooler.

-Using a flat screwdriver or socket loosen the clamps connecting the hoses to the cooler. Now have the plastic connector handy. Remove the hoses from the cooler, you may need to pry on them with a screw driver.I find that twisting them to break their seal works well. Catch any coolant that spills in the pan.

-Take each rubber hose and push them onto the plastic connector being sure to keep the clamps on the hoses. Tighten the clamps. (Not too tight, just snug) Now you have just eliminated the cooler from the system temporarily.The rubber hoses are now connected to each other.

-Wipe the oil cooler clean with a rag so it is easier to see any leaks that might develop.

-Now start the engine and let it run to normal operating temperature.This means at least 15 minutes but to be sure you find any leaks I suggest half an hour.

-Keep a close eye on the 2 metal tubes on the oil cooler. (The ones you removed the rubber hoses from) You are looking for engine oil to begin seeping out. It will appear golden brown to black in color.

If you see oil coming from those tubes you have found your problem. You will need to buy and install a new oil cooler.

If you don't see any oil leaking you will need to look elsewhere for the trouble. Possibly a head gasket, unfortunately.

-Let the engine cool for a few hours before reattaching the oil cooler. It is the reverse of removal.

-Replace any lost coolant with the same amount you caught in the pan.

And there you have it. A pretty simple procedure that may save you a bunch of cash in repairs.



on Jan 31, 2010 | Volkswagen Golf Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Hi, i have automatic passat 1999 model and recently water happens to get into the gear box and it control board, i experiences a boom sound anytime the gear is changed, the oil has been changed by the...


If no external leak and the transmission fluid colour looks white, the problem belongs to the automatic gearbox oil cooler. The oil cooler has broke mixing the gearbox oil and coolant causing this milkshake. It's a small radiator core type oil / water heat exchanger. It is cracked inside and transmission oil is mixed with engine coolant. Because the transmission oil pressure is greater than engine coolant pressure, the transmission fluid level drops. See also the coolant colour inside recovery coolant reservoir inder bonnet! It could be like this:

tdisline_495.jpg
The automatic gearbox oil cooler type oil / water heat exchanger (oil cooler):

tdisline_496.jpg
In the picture above the transmission oil pan was removed for oil filter replacement.

May 05, 2011 | 1999 Volkswagen Passat

1 Answer

Need to change coolant recovery tank can a anyone do it


Yes you can do it yourself

Degas Bottle Removal
  1. Drain radiator (8005) until engine coolant is out of degas bottle. Disconnect radiator overflow hose (8075) and engine coolant vent hose at degas bottle.
  1. Remove power steering oil reservoir retaining screws and position power steering oil reservoir (3A697) out of the way.
  1. Remove degas bottle return hose and clamp. Remove degas bottle retainers and remove degas bottle.
Installation
  1. Position degas bottle in vehicle and install retaining screw and nut. Tighten retaining bolt and nut to 9-12 Nm (80-106 lb-in).
  1. Connect degas bottle hose and clamp to degas bottle.
  1. Position power steering oil reservoir onto degas bottle and install retaining screws securely.
  1. Connect radiator overflow hose and engine coolant vent hose to degas bottle.
  1. Fill and bleed engine cooling system as described. Check for coolant leaks and proper engine coolant level after engine reaches normal operating temperature.


    q3699b.gif


    Item Part Number Description 1 8100 Radiator Cap 2 - Nut (1 Req'd) 3 - Bolt and Retainer (1 Req'd) 4 - Nut (1 Req'd) 5 - Bolt (1 Req'd) 6 - Coolant Recovery Hose 7 - Coolant Return Hose 8 - Coolant Recovery Hose 9 8A808 Degas Bottle A - Tighten to 9-12 Nm (80-106 Lb-In)
Hope this helps.

Zeppelinx12

Mar 08, 2011 | 1999 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Transmission fluid level need regular top up and there is no external leak.Fluid color looks white.


If no external leak and the transmission fluid colour looks white, the problem belongs to the automatic gearbox oil cooler. The oil cooler has broke mixing the gearbox oil and coolant causing this milkshake. It's a small radiator core type oil / water heat exchanger. It is cracked inside and transmission oil is mixed with engine coolant. Because the transmission oil pressure is greater than engine coolant pressure, the transmission fluid level drops. See also the coolant colour inside recovery coolant reservoir inder bonnet! It could be like this:

9d86426.jpg

The automatic gearbox oil cooler type oil / water heat exchanger (oil cooler):

138b4e6.jpg
(In the picture above the transmission oil pan was removed for oil filter replacement).

Oct 29, 2010 | 2005 Audi A4

1 Answer

Hi i have a 20 passat 20v turbo ,runs good,dont


good likely hood that your oil cooler is leaking oil into coolant this is something you want to replace as soon as possible. you will have to flush your coolant system several times to get as much of the oil out as possible. if you wait you will have severe temp issues as well as not heat due to a clogged heater core. and that is very hard to replace. To flush system hook garden hose to the larger hose of the coolant reservoir get car up to temp. keep idle up a little. get large bucket from the smaller hose that goes into the reservoir hook small hose to it and let it empty into bucket keep hose running thru all the time. before that though replace oil cooler. also replace coolant reservoir as well. or oil will contaminate new coolant. good luck

Sep 01, 2009 | 2003 Volkswagen Passat

1 Answer

Replace a coolant reservior on a 1999 ford taurus


If you need Illistration I Can Email it to you Im at
rejakwilson @ aol.com

Removal

CAUTION: Do not mix Standard (green) Coolant with Extended Life Coolant (orange). If mixing occurs, drain engine cooling system and refill with originally equipped coolant type. If this contamination occurs, the service change interval on Extended Life Coolant will be reduced from 6 years/150,000 miles to 3 years/30,000 miles.

  1. Drain radiator until engine coolant is out of degas bottle. Disconnect radiator overflow hose and engine coolant vent hose at degas bottle.
  2. Remove power steering oil reservoir retaining screws and position power steering oil reservoir out of the way.
  3. Remove degas bottle return hose and clamp. Remove degas bottle retainers and remove degas bottle.
Installation
  1. Position degas bottle in vehicle and install retaining screw and nut. Tighten retaining bolt and nut to 9-12 Nm (80-106 inch lbs.)
  2. Connect degas bottle hose and clamp to degas bottle.
  3. Position power steering oil reservoir onto degas bottle and install retaining screws securely.
  4. Connect radiator overflow hose and engine coolant vent hose to degas bottle.

Aug 28, 2009 | 1999 Ford Taurus

2 Answers

2002 saturn L300 with Oil in the coolant.


First, no coolant flows through the intake on the 3.0L in the L300 and Catera. The intake is a 5 piece setup, the base of which is a phenolic spacer to isolate heat from the intake manifold.

Beneath the phenolic spacer there is an oil cooler installed between the cylinders inside the block. There is a cover with 2 oil cooler lines that run up from the right side of the engine to the cover and into the cooler via an inlet and outlet banjo bolt. If the cooler wears out there will be an exchange of coolant and oil, more oil into the coolant than coolant into the oil, although there will be some.

You might notice a small drop in performance, and later will notice that the coolant reservoir is full of oil and is spilling over.

I'd start by checking cylinder compression to make sure you don't ALSO have a blown head gasket, but the cooler is quite notorious for blowing out. If you do decide to replace it you will need:
1: a new oil cooler
2: new gaskets for the steel cooler lines, they will be metal crush gaskets. 4 as they are for the banjo bolts (2 washers for each bolt, one bolt on each line)
3: 4 new gaskets for the coolant bridge (the almost crescent shape aluminum bridge next to the oil cooler cover, aluminum with hoses attached as well as the coolant temp sensor)
4: New gaskets for the banjo bolts on the coolant bridge, they're rubber but don't just use some junk! Get the real deal ones from the dealer and save yourself the trouble of redoing it later on. They're cheap.
5: Oil, Antifreeze and a new oil filter. I'd spring for the Coolant system cleaner if it's not a big deal, less oil in the cooling system makes for a better performing engine and better heat in the winter.

Tools: 3/8" ratchet, standard set of extensions for the ratchet, set of Torx sockets and inverted Torx sockets, set of 3/8" sockets, flat head screwdriver, dikes or side cutters.

1: take off the intake manifold clamps by prying where they latch together, don't damage them unless you plan on replacing them (your call, but a tech would reuse them)

2: take off all the Torx bolts for the manifolds, there's 4 pieces to the aluminum manifolds and the ECM and Vacuum reservoir have to come off the rear manifold to get to some of the bolts. NOTE the location of all vacuum lines and coolant lines so you don't forget them later. Also note the position of the ECM on the manifold so you don't have to figure out which way it goes on later, it only plugs in one way but it's a pain if you fumble it up.

3: Take out the phenolic spacer (black thing under all the manifolds, feels like plastic). There are rubber gaskets on these, if they're damaged then it's a good time to replace them, if not they are usually reusable. Napa, Advance Auto, Auto Zone, etc. always have them. Just ask for intake manifold gaskets, even though they're really phenolic spacer gaskets.

4: Remove the banjo bolts for the oil cooler lines, note the placement of gaskets on each side of the line that the banjo bolt goes through. You'll want to remember that later to avoid a leak. Also remove the coolant bridge banjo bolts and move it out of the way, again noting the gaskets for later replacement.

5: loosen the 2 nuts where the oil cooler lines were, these are attached to the oil cooler and secure it to the cover.

6: Remove the Torx bolts for the cooler cover, lift the cover, and remove the cooler. Make sure you clean that galley out real well, saves you some headache when cleaning later on.

7: When reinstalling the oil cooler cover remember to use a 2mm bead of sealant around there. I've seen guys use Permatex Orange, but if you can swing it then get something better from the dealership. You don't want to do this again in a year if the Permatex leaks on you.

8: Reinstall coolant bridge, oil cooler lines, phenolic spacer, manifold(s) and clamps. Double check all your work! Change your oil, and flush out the cooling system.

Estimated time? For a tech.. probably 2 hours. For a Shadetree mechanic? Probably 4 to 5 hours.

Good luck!

Jul 27, 2009 | Saturn L300 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

2005 Touareg needing new oil cooler & camshaft


Yes you could have a faulty oil cooler.But The oil in the coolent has nothing to do with the camshaft.There just trying to make a fast buck from you.Tell them just to change the oil cooler and nothing else.

Jun 18, 2009 | 2005 Volkswagen Touareg

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