Question about 1991 Honda Prelude

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Bushings for the arms that connect to the cross member

My cross member is bent in half.
i have a new one and i was wondering if there was a way i could take off the four arms and save the bushings.
if not is there a good site i can find them on or a way to make it work with bushing that are for a different part or size.

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Hi problem you are going to have is the age of the car i would be suprised if the bushes come out in good condition as the bolts usually seize to the bushes sleeves and are almost impossible to get the bolt out without damageing the bushes you heard the saying do you feel lucky well this applies you could try to see if the bolts will come out if so you got a good chance of getting them out ok i am in england so as far as where you would get parts from not a clue yates210456

Posted on Oct 09, 2008

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Good luck. The TRW's are one-piece urethane, (I think) and came with a lifetime guarantee. They'll probably outlast the vehicle.

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Illustration of control arm:
http://www.penguinscouts.com/pics/jeep/Differential%20Suspension.jpg

The wishbone part, number 12, is the control arm. In the two ends, left side of picture, are the two bushings. These are pressed in bushings.

The rubber bushings, with their bonded steel shells, are separate parts, the part number for the (2) bushings are: 52088425

These bushings normally won't be damaged, but, in my case, due to extensive towing of a heavy trailer, these bushings had tears in the rubber bonding between the shell and the central spindle. These tears caused by the trailer snatching the frame around (trailer hitch is frame mounted) while the differential is essentially connected to the earth, through the tire rubber, and to the frame, through the ball joint and arm rubber bushings.

You can easily view the condition of the rubber simply by rolling under the vehicle with a flashlight, and looking. The bolts are vertical, right up through the bushing spindle, into the frame.

The bolts through the bushing spindle mount the arm to the frame.

The ball joint, at the apex of the arm, is number 8, and is Jeep part number 52088808AB.

This ball joint is an assembly which also includes the mounting flange plate. This plate bolts atop the differential housing with three bolts. The ball joint pin protrudes through the hole in the apex of the arms, and is secured by a nut, item 11, Jeep part number 06502698

Again, don't replace the bushings unless you see visible tears in the rubber web, or rotted, aged, cracked out webbing.

One more thing to note if you take down the arm... the emergency brake cables and brake lines are secured to the arm with small metal clips and bolts. Minor point here is when you reattach these bolts, don't crank down on them more than about 12 ft lbs torque, as these bolts go into the sheet metal wall of the arm, and there's no need to try to strip out these threads... Just secure them a bit, not to tank down on them.

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4 Answers

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Problem I found: Clunk when driving over even small bumps.

If Grand Cherokee is 1999-2004, then check this: Above the differential is a wishbone cross member control arm. The cross member attaches to the frame in front of the rear axle (bolts through rubber bushings), and directly above the differential, at the apex of the cross member, is a ball joint. The ball joint assembly is a flange bolted atop the differential, with three bolts, and the ball joint pin protrudes from the flange through the cross member apex, with a nut atop the pin. Raise the frame slightly, and with a pry bar, pry above the flange, and below the cross member, very near the ball joint. If any motion is detected, then the ball joint is worn from the ball joint socket, or the nut is loose on the ball joint pin. If the nut is tight, then replace the ball joint. 2000 GC part number is 52088808AB, and is available from online sources or dealers. To replace this part, you'll probably need to remove the cross member, as the ball joint pin through the cross member is in a tight location, is tightly wedged into the cross member, and requires a special v-shaped puller to remove the pin from the cross member. If you don't have access to the puller tool, then remove the cross member for this operation. Raise vehicle slightly, under frame, in front of rear wheels. Unbolt the brake line and brake cable retainers from the cross member, then unbolt the flange from atop the differential. Then remove the two frame bolts and manipulate the cross member out of the vehicle, from above the differential.

With the cross member before you, support on blocks, loosen the ball joint nut somewhat, or remove it, and with a beater protective block, sledge out the pin from the cross member. Inspect the rubber bushings at this time. These bushings require an arbor press to remove/install, and the arbor press to install requires a spider so as to not rip the rubber bushing from either the bushing shell or center spool. The press spider is a 4-point tool you can make up from a piece of aluminum.

Bolt the new ball joint flange atop the differential, using blue thread locker, and torque the bolts to 100 ft-lb, cheater pipe useful here.

Replace the cross member to the frame, and install the two frame bolts, finger tight. Pull the member apex down onto the ball joint pin, and run the nut down. Using a box end wrench, hold the pin from rotation while tightening down the nut. Torque the nut to 100 ft-lb. Tighten the frame attachment bolts to 100 ft-lb, and reinstall the brake cable and brake line retainers. Do not over tighten these retainer bolts, as they are passing only through the sheet steel side of the cross member. Take care to not strip the sheet metal threadings. Lower vehicle and remove jack.

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