Question about 2006 Honda Civic Hybrid

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Air conditioning fuse on 2006 civic

My air panel just stopped working, and I'm guessing a fuse blew (hoping it's just a fuse). I can't figure out which fuse I need to replace to check if this is the problem, and my manual isn't much help. Anyone have this problem, know how to solve it?

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5 Suggested Answers

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Rear Air conditioning

I have the same problem, but here are some solutions. Do it yourself and save money. It is sooo easy and I am a chic!
The TSB can be found here: http://www.hondapilot.org/forums/attachment.php?s=&postid=210593

http://myweb.cableone.net/dado/03Pilot.doc

Posted on Jul 02, 2008

  • 71 Answers

SOURCE: AIR CONDITIONING NOT COLD IN 1997 HONDA CIVIC

Reguardless of how old the car is should make no difference as too how cold the AC is blowing. I have a 1997 Honda Civic with 215,000 miles on it and it still runs great, so yours is just barely broken in :) Maybe you need some refrigerant (R-134) added to make it colder? As to the power issue of the car, all air conditioners take appoximately 5-10 horsepower away from a cars engine when turned on. Have you ever had your spark plugs changed? That is usually cheap $10 - $20 if you do it yourself or probably $50 - $75 if you take it to a mechanic, and it makes a big difference in power. ( Make sure they use NGK spark plugs, that is what Honda uses) Also, on your other post about the timing belt which YES you do have a timing belt and not a chain, I have always been told to change the timing belt AND WATER PUMP at every 90,000 miles. The water pump should be changed because if it locks up it will break the new belt they just put on and then the damage I talk about later will happen to the engine. That should cost you around $250 - $400 depending on where you take it? preferably a Honda dealer because it may cost a little more but they know their stuff. It is important to change it because if it breaks it will cause your valves in the engine to get bent and then you will basically need a new motor at that point. Lastly, if you want to find the year of your car then look inside the drivers side door frame, there will be a VIN number and a manufacture date. Well I am sure this is more than you ever wanted to know about your car but there you go:)

Posted on Oct 09, 2008

SOURCE: Air condition is not cooling my car is Honda Civic 2003

Realize that auto AC is basically a refrigerator in a weird layout. It's designed to move heat from one place (the inside of your car) to some other place (the outdoors). While a complete discussion of every specific model and component is well outside the scope of this article, this should give you a start on figuring out what the problem might be and either fixing it yourself or talking intelligently to someone you can pay to fix it.Become familiar with the major components to auto air conditioning:
the compressor, which compresses and circulates the refrigerant in the system the refrigerant, (on modern cars, usually a substance called R-134a older cars have r-12 freon which is becoming increasingly more expensive and hard to find, and also requires a license to handle) which carries the heat the condenser, which changes the phase of the refrigerant and expels heat removed from the car the expansion valve (or orifice tube in some vehicles), which is somewhat of a nozzle and functions to similtaneously drop the pressure of the refrigerant liquid, meter its flow, and atomize it
the evaporator, which transfers heat to the refrigerant from the air blown across it, cooling your car
the receiver/dryer, which functions as a filter for the refrigerant/oil, removing moisture and other contaminants Understand the air conditioning process: The compressor puts the refrigerant under pressure and sends it to the condensing coils. In your car, these coils are generally in front of the radiator. Compressing a gas makes it quite hot. In the condenser, this added heat and the heat the refrigerant picked up in the evaporator is expelled to the air flowing across it from outside the car. When the refrigerant is cooled to its saturation temperature, it will change phase from a gas back into a liquid (this gives off a bundle of heat known as the "latent heat of vaporization"). The liquid then passes through the expansion valve to the evaporator, the coils inside of your car, where it loses pressure that was added to it in the compressor. This causes some of the liquid to change to a low-pressure gas as it cools the remaining liquid. This two-phase mixture enters the evaporator, and the liquid portion of the refrigerant absorbs the heat from the air across the coil and evaporates. Your car's blower circulates air across the cold evaporator and into the interior. The refrigerant goes back through the cycle again and again. Check to see if all the R-134a leaks out (meaning there's nothing in the loop to carry away heat). Leaks are easy to spot but not easy to fix without pulling things apart. Most auto-supply stores carry a fluorescent dye that can be added to the system to check for leaks, and it will have instructions for use on the can. If there's a bad enough leak, the system will have no pressure in it at all. Find one of the valve-stem-looking things and CAREFULLY (eye protection recommended) poke a pen in there to try to valve off pressure, and if there IS none, that's the problem. Make sure the compressor is turning. Start the car, turn on the AC and look under the hood. The AC compressor is generally a pumplike thing off to one side with large rubber and steel hoses going to it. It will not have a filler cap on it, but will often have one or two things that look like the valve stems on a bike tire. The pulley on the front of the compressor exists as an outer pulley and an inner hub which turns when an electric clutch is engaged. If the AC is on and the blower is on, but the center of the pulley is not turning, then the compressor's clutch is not engaging. This could be a bad fuse, a wiring problem, a broken AC switch in your dash, or the system could be low on refrigerant (most systems have a low-pressure safety cutout that will disable the compressor if there isn't enough refrigerant in the system). Look for other things that can go wrong: bad switches, bad fuses, broken wires, broken fan belt (preventing the pump from turning), or seal failure inside the compressor. Feel for any cooling at all. If the system cools, but not much, it could just be low pressure, and you can top up the refrigerant. Most auto-supply stores will have a kit to refill a system, and it will come with instructions. Do not overfill! Adding more than the recommended amount of refrigerant will NOT improve performance but actually will decrease performance. In fact, the more expensive automated equipment found at nicer shops actually monitors cooling performance real-time as it adds refrigerant, and when the performance begins to decrease it removes refrigerant until the performance peaks again.

Posted on Apr 21, 2009

Online-Tech
  • 51 Answers

SOURCE: 2003 honda civic air conditioning working

Hi,
I would request you to please do the following steps to why the AC has stopped working.
1. Check to see if all the R-134a leaks out (meaning there's nothing in the loop to carry away heat). Leaks are easy to spot but not easy to fix without pulling things apart. Most auto-supply stores carry a fluorescent dye that can be added to the system to check for leaks, and it will have instructions for use on the can. If there's a bad enough leak, the system will have no pressure in it at all. Find one of the valve-stem-looking things and CAREFULLY (eye protection recommended) pokes a pen in there to try to valve off pressure, and if there IS none, that's the problem.
2. Make sure the compressor is turning. Start the car, turn on the AC and look under the hood. The AC compressor is generally a pump like thing off to one side with large rubber and steel hoses going to it. It will not have a filler cap on it, but will often have one or two things that look like the valve stems on a bike tire. The pulley on the front of the compressor exists as an outer pulley and an inner hub which turns when an electric clutch is engaged. If the AC is on and the blower is on, but the center of the pulley is not turning, then the compressor's clutch is not engaging. This could be a bad fuse, a wiring problem, a broken AC switch in your dash, or the system could be low on refrigerant (most systems have a low-pressure safety cutout that will disable the compressor if there isn't enough refrigerant in the system).

Thank You for using Fixya.com

Posted on Jul 31, 2009

  • 619 Answers

SOURCE: replacing fuse on 2001 Honda Civic Instrument panel

Use fuse size listed on fuse panel, panel should show diagram and fuse sizes. Putting a larger fuse where it does not belong could result in melted wires.

Posted on Feb 16, 2010

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