Question about 1997 Ford Escort

1 Answer

Off center-rotating noise from front end of "97 escort w/manual trans/high miles

Audible even when free wheeling out of gear when decelerating. Front end is tight and stable and no noise from CV's when turning. Hub bearing? transmisssion?

Posted by on

  • eugenorf3 Oct 27, 2008

    i am having the same problem with a 99 hyundai sonata, did you figure it out?

×

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

    Sergeant:

    An expert that has over 500 points.

  • Expert
  • 324 Answers

If it is like a rubbing type sound, then yes it is the wheeel bearing, unfortantly these are presed in and may need a professional to reoplace it.

Posted on Nov 26, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

2003 ford sport trac front grinding noise from drivers side when sharp left turn


go to the magicmechanic website and send him this--hes the best there is and will rply

Jan 19, 2015 | 2003 Ford Explorer Sport Trac

1 Answer

97 Cadillac Delegance Front end noise , dissapears when going into right hand turn then returns when straightening out. Tires recently rotated and balanced , tire that was on right front had wear pattern...


I would be checking out the wheel bearings for the problem. I would also be checking the front suspension for worn ball joints and steering end joints. Tyre wear patterns indicate unbalance-wheel alignment-shock absorbers and front end wear. I refuse to rotate tyres for several reasons Radial tyres when developing a wear pattern will retain that wear pattern even if placed on a trailer--Wear patterns show a fault for that wheel and tells which wheel and what needs to be done to repair it and lastly tyres wear in pairs so if you have a front wheel drive car why replace 4 tyres when the need is to replace only 2 front ones. Saves about 50% of the cost of tyres. The rotation theory came about from cross ply tyres and does not apply to radials except for tyre dealers profits

Sep 23, 2013 | 1997 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

47,880 miles, needs front ransmission mount $300 parts & labor also needs left outer tie rod end $240 parts & labor. Which is most important to repair first-- I have saved $200.Car still holding...


The tie rod end is more important of the 2 because of safety. But according to prices, I would shop around other shops. $300 sounds high for trans mount. Just for kicks, call a parts store and ask for outer tie rod and trans mount for '88 escort or you can even check online Advance, autozone both have good inline stores. I bet you'll find "your quoted shop" has very inflated prices.

Mar 03, 2011 | 1998 Ford Escort

1 Answer

My 2005 avalon has 154,000 miles on it and I'm getting a noise from the front end, expecially when I turn sharply to the right or left. I have the tires rotated and balanced every 6,000 miles. Would this...


sounds like it could be wheel bearings but I'm surprised that when they rotate the tires they didn't catch this.

The next time you have your tires rotated ask to have the jacked up front end tested for loose front end parts. They can shake it down physically looking for play in the ball joints, tie rod ends, and bearings.

Struts generally wear out and cause a bouncy front end conditioin. Brakes, if properly assembled, won't make any additional noise when turning left or right.

Good luck on this.

Jul 14, 2010 | 2005 Toyota Avalon

2 Answers

Front end growls when in 4 wheel drive


Before using the 4wd, did you have the transfer case, front differential, and front axle locking hubs inspected, properly lubed, and tested? No one ever does, so don't feel bad if you don't know what shape the 4wd components are in. You probably haven't used 4wd in last five months. Most people don't ever put their 4wd vehicles in 4wd mode, even though the service manual says to operate the vehicle for a minimum of 10 low speed miles every 3000-4000 miles. This helps maintain the proper function of any limited slip parts, internal bearings, and gear components. Operating in 4wd periodically also helps insure any electric devices are working. What you may be hearing is the unused front differential parts, transfer case bits, or electrically controlled locking hubs wearing out from the lack of use, proper maintenance, or just plain age (after all you did say it's a 2001). Front pinion and differential bearings are not usually ever spun/rotated unless the transfer case and hubs are locked in 4wd. If they were starved of gear oil, or dry when you went 4wheeling, you torn them up. Refer to the owner's manual (if you still have it) for proper 4wd opration. You'd be surprised that there are proceedures to do in order to maintain a reliable vehicle. Don't ever just drop it in gear and expect it to work..... I mean come on.... after all, It is a Dodge! Your next step is to find a full service mechanic, with a complete selection of tools and shop supplies (especally a hydrolic press) and schedule an appointment to have the 4wd front components inspected and replaced if neccessary.

Oct 10, 2009 | 2001 Dodge Durango

1 Answer

E 150 for van conversion noise from passenger side front wheel


First have wheel bearing checked for signs galling of the bearing races. That could cause the noise. Have the front alignment checked. To solve your tire wear problem

Aug 22, 2009 | 2002 Ford E-Series

1 Answer

How to change the power steering on 96 ford explorer


Section 11-02C: Steering Gear, Power Rack and Pinion, Explorer 1996 Explorer with Power Rack and Pinion Steering Workshop Manual REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION Steering Gear SPECIAL SERVICE TOOL(S) REQUIRED Description Tool Number Pitman Arm Puller T64P-3590-F
Removal
  1. Start engine.
  1. Rotate steering wheel from lock-to-lock (entire gear travel). Record n umber of rotations.
  1. Divide the number of rotations by two. This gives the required number of turns to place system in the on-center position.
  1. NOTE: Verify the front wheels and steering wheel are in the straight-ahead position.

    From the lock position, rotate steering wheel the number of turns determined in Step 3. This places the gear in the on-center position.


    Steering Gear, Explorer




  1. NOTE: Do not rotate steering column when intermediate shaft is disconnected or DAMAGE TO CLOCKSPRING will result.

    Remove bolt retaining the lower steering column shaft to the steering gear input shaft.




  1. Disconnect the lower steering column shaft from the steering gear.
  1. Remove stabilizer bar attachment from frame for clearance to remove gear.
  1. Unscrew the quick connect fittings for the power steering pressure hose (3A719) and power steering return hoses (3A713) at the steering gear housing (3548).


    Power Steering Hose Connections





    Item Part Number Description 1 3A674 Power Steering Pump 2 3A719 Power Steering Pressure Hose 3 3F780 Power Steering Cooler and Hose Assembly 4 3504 Steering Gear 5 5005 Frame
  1. Plug ends of fluid lines removed and ports in gear to prevent damage and entry of dirt.
  1. Remove two (2) nuts from P/S cooler.
  1. Remove P/S cooler from vehicle.
  1. Remove and discard the cotter pin retaining the nut to tie rod end (3A130) and remove nut.
  1. Separate tie rod ends from front wheel spindle (3105) using Pitman Arm Puller T64P-3590-F.




  1. Remove the two nuts, bolts, and washer assemblies retaining steering gear (3504) to front crossmember (5019).
  1. Remove steering gear from vehicle. If required, remove steering gear mounting bracket housing insulators (3F640) and steering gear insulators (3C716) from steering gear housing.





    Item Part Number Description 1 N807881-S60 Bolt 2 385935-S36 Washer 3 3F640 Steering Gear Mounting Housing Insulator 4 3504 Steering Gear 5 N800255-S60 Nut 6 5019 Front Crossmember 7 3C716 Steering Gear Insulator
Installation
  1. If removed, install steering gear mounting insulators into the steering gear housing.
  1. Push the steering gear mounting insulator and steering gear insulator in until there is no space between the lip on the insulator and steering gear housing.
  1. Position steering gear on front crossmember. Install nuts, bolts and washers retaining steering gear to front crossmember. Tighten to 128-172 Nm (94-127 lb-ft).
  1. Position power steering cooler onto bolts and install nuts. Tighten nuts to 68-92 Nm (50-68 lb-ft).
  1. NOTE: The fittings design allows the power steering pressure hose and power steering return hose to swivel when properly tightened. Do not attempt to eliminate looseness by overtightening, since this can cause damage to fittings.

    Connect power steering pressure hose and power steering return hose to appropriate ports on steering gear housing. Tighten fittings to 27-34 Nm (20-25 lb-ft).
  1. NOTE: Make sure the tie rod ends (3A131) are seated in the tapered spindle holes to prevent rotation while tightening nut.

    With the steering gear, steering wheel (3600) and wheel (1007) in the on-center position, attach the tie rod end to front wheel spindle and tighten to 56-76 Nm (77-103 lb-ft).
  1. If necessary, advance tie rod nuts to the next slot. Install cotter pins.
  1. NOTE: Verify that no rotation from the on-center position has occurred.

    Position steering column lower intermediate shaft over steering gear input shaft. Outer input shaft dust shield must be in place. Replace pinch bolt and tighten to 41-56 Nm (30-42 lb-ft).
  1. Replace the front wheel and tire assemblies. Refer to Section 04-04 .
  1. Replace wheel covers.
  1. Lower vehicle.
  1. Refill power steering oil reservoir (3A697) with Premium Power Steering Fluid E6AZ-19582-AA or equivalent meeting Ford specification ESW-M2C33-F.
  1. Purge air from steering system. Refer to Section 11-00 . Verify absence of any unusual power steering noise.
  1. Check and adjust toe alignment specifications. Refer to Section 04-00 .
  1. Make sure steering gear operates correctly and is not leaking.
  1. Check and adjust fluid level in power steering oil reservoir.

Jul 10, 2009 | 1998 Mercury Villager

1 Answer

1999 escort 5 sp manual trans. had vibration


IF GEAR SHIFT SHAKES THEN THE TRANSMISSION MOUNTS COULD BE BAD. HOPE THIS HELPS. GOOD LUCK

May 01, 2009 | 1993 Dodge Shadow

4 Answers

Noise and vibration above 50 mph


Sounds like front differential or front drive axle issues. Check the front differential gear oil then take er' to the dealership before you end up spending a bunch of $. Most people change their oil frequently in the engine but forget about flushing the transmission fluid and changing oil in the front and rear differentials. I have three Ford 4X4s. Two which really get used hard. The 93 has 311K miles and still runs excellent. Trans and differentials get a fluid change every 25K miles and moble one synthetic engine oil changes every 5k miles.

Jan 25, 2009 | 2005 Ford F-150

1 Answer

97 COMPUTER TRANSMISSION HARD TO SHIFT UNTIL IT,S WARMED UP[EXSCORT


get code check for any trans codes...sounds like front pump though...internal issue mechanical..need at least partial rebuild to remedy

Oct 21, 2008 | 1997 Ford Escort

Not finding what you are looking for?
1997 Ford Escort Logo

156 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Ford Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

61249 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

21949 Answers

Fordexpert

Level 3 Expert

5331 Answers

Are you a Ford Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...