Question about 1992 Toyota Land Cruiser

1 Answer

Low and high side of the A/C system and type of refrigerant?

Where is the low and the high side of the A/C system and what type of refrigerant for a 1992 toyota landcruiser

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Toyota Master
  • 1,861 Answers

Hello, and thank you for your question.

The High side & Low side valves are located in the engine compartment, and can be found on the aluminum lines running from the condenser to the firewall (a bigger tube, this is the HIGH side), and from the firewall to the condensor (in front of the radiator), & back to the compressor (this is the LOW side/a smaller tube). Regarding the refrigerant, you may have a dilemma. Most LCs in 92 came with R-12 freon, and is very expensive to purchase, and, in some places, a license is needed to purchase it. Your system *** may *** have been retrofitted with the "new" style (the "enviromentally friendly" type R-134A) refrigerant. To determine this, look under the caps on the abovementioned tubes. If the metal fittings are small & threaded, you have the original system. If the fittings are large, and are screwed onto a smaller fitting, and are grooved at the center of the upright stem, you have the newer style. You would also have rather large caps with a "H" ans an "L" imprinted on them. If you need to add refrigerent, add whatever refrigerant required into the LOW side, until the bubbles seen in the sight glass adjjacent to the radiator (on the Low side tube) disappear.

Posted on Oct 03, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Where is the orifice tube located on 88 buick park avenue


Inspect/Test/Replace To raise pressure, there must be a restriction in the air conditioning system. The restriction divides the system into the high side and the low side. The terms high side and low side refer to the high pressure and low pressure within the system.
The flow control can be either an orifice tube or a metering device called an expansion valve. A thermostatic expansion valve controls the amount of refrigerant that is allowed to flow to the evaporator. A temperature sensing bulb on the evaporator inlet controls the expansion valve.
  • A bad expansion valve will cause low readings on both the low and high side.
  • Failure of the sensing bulb is the most common problem.
  • Sometimes the valve can become plugged with debris.
  • If the sensing capillary tube is warm, there is high pressure that pushes on the diaphragm.
  • The sensing bulb checks the temperature of the outlet line of the evaporator.
  • If it is warm, it opens the valve.
  • Pressure on top of the diaphragm tries to push the valve open.
  • The operation of the expansion valve can be checked.
  • Some expansion valves can be cleaned, repaired or adjusted.
f73-15a.gif This system uses an expansion valve as it's flow control device. Some expansion valves are wrapped with insulation. When the sensing bulb is in the evaporator case, it does not need to be wrapped because it stays cold. When an expansion valve is packed in that type of system, it is only to silence the noise that the evaporator makes.

CAUTION
Only EPA-certified technicians can purchase R-12 refrigerant, since proper recovery and recycling techniques are required to prevent damaging the environment. Improper disposal of R-12 refrigerant can result in a fine.

Jun 06, 2012 | Buick Park Avenue Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

What should the pressures on the low and high side of the air conditioner read ?


low side should be about 30 psi at idle speed, high side 120 to 180 psi depending on ambient temp. higher temp, = higher pressure, as you increase engine rpm to say 1000 low side should drop to 10 to 15 psi & high side should increase about 30 psi. If high side goes over 280- 300psi you have contamination (air) in system or over charged with refrigerant. you will need to recover freon, evacuate & recharge system with proper amount of refrigerant. If the low side drops below 0psi or into vacuum then the refrigerant level is low, you will have to check for leaks , repair leaks & refill refrigerant.
Hope this helps
Paul T

Jun 01, 2011 | 1997 Chevrolet Suburban

2 Answers

How to recharge recharge airconditioner


Hi, determine if your car uses R134 or R12 refrigerant. You will notice screw type connectors on the both the High Pressure Side and Low Pressure Side lines in models using R12 refrigerant. R134 compatible models have quick connect valves on both sides. Models made before 1995 may use the old R12 refrigerant. If this is the case, you must have your Chrysler's air conditioning system retrofitted to use R134 refrigerant. Mixing R12 and R134 refrigerants is dangerous and may cause damage to your vehicle. Check your air conditioning system pressure using an automotive air conditioning pressure gauge. Keep in mind that in order to get an accurate reading, the air conditioner has be turned on the coldest setting with maximum blowing power. Remove the Low Pressure Side port valve cap and set it aside. The location of the port varies, but it is usually in front of the engine block. Attach the refill hose to the port on the Low Pressure Side of the air conditioning system. The Low Pressure Side port is smaller the High Pressure Side port. Because the ports are different sizes, the refill kit hose should fit only on the Low Pressure Side port. Additionally, the High Pressure Side port will usually have a red cap or be marked with an H or the word High Allow the air conditioner to **** the refrigerant out of the can by slowly turning the valve on the refill kit hose. Pay attention to the way you hold the can. Most kits will have you hold the can upright when you recharge the air conditioning system. It may take as long as 10 minutes to empty a single can. Turn the valve to the off position and remove the refill hose from the port. Recap the port before closing the hood. Let the air conditioner stay on for at least 30 minutes. This allows the refrigerant to move throughout the entire system.
Take care

Aug 03, 2010 | 2006 Chrysler Town & Country

1 Answer

I just finished charging it it's at 100 psi low side tube gets cold right at fill point rest of system does not. Dryer is hot.


100 AT PSI ON THE LOW SIDE TOO MUCH REFRIGERANT.LOW SIDE NEED TO BE 28 PSI. HIGH SIDE SHOULD BE 200 PSI.YOU NEED A MANIFOLD GAUGE SET TO SEE YOUR LOW AND HIGH PRESSURE SIDE.YOU PUT TOO MUCH REFRIGERANT IN AC SYSTEM IT WILL EXPLODE CAUSE SERIOUS INJURY AND DAMAGE THE COMPRESSOR.

Jun 11, 2010 | 1997 Audi A8

2 Answers

AC not cooling


You need to have the system vacuum evacuated, using a vacuum pump and a set of gauges, to verify that it is holding. You also must install EXACTLY the amount or refrigerant that the system calls for. Too much or too little will result in failure.

Sep 03, 2009 | 1995 Geo Prizm

1 Answer

Ac wont get cold after adding refrigerant


To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
Keep in mind that using an A/C gauge set and seeing BOTH high and low side readings can help in diagnosing the problem when you know what to look for. First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) - Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105 PSI Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s - Ranges from 25-35 PSI - Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25 PSI Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI.
Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better!  Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.

Both low and high side readings are lower than normal, this indicates a cars AC system is low on refrigerant and is under-charged. If both low and high side readings are too high, this indicates an overcharged system - too much refrigerant. This also can indicate that the condenser fan is not working, is too slow or the car is overheating and heat is transferring from the radiator to the condenser.

When the low side goes so low that it’s reading shows it is in a vacuum, the most likely cause is a bad expansion valve or blocked orifice tube. Another possibility is a restricted condenser. Blocked condensers are not as common as they used to be but if a compressor fails and comes apart inside the remnants can end up in the condenser causing it to restrict the flow of refrigerant. 

When the compressor clutch is definitely engaged and the low side is high and the high side is low, the most likely cause is that the compressor is failing - it is not pumping sufficiently. Rarely an AC clutch could be slipping but usually this will be accompanied with a squeal or chirp.

Hope this helps. If the compressor did come on and pulled the R134a in to the system, you may still be low or you may be over charged. With out any pressure readings it's had for me to say what is the problem. You could also have a bad orifice tube ( expansion valve) Good luck and hope this helps. 

Jul 03, 2009 | 1998 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

I have full gas in my car but still no cold air inside the car


If you over charged the system your a/c will not work. To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
Keep in mind that using an A/C gauge set and seeing BOTH high and low side readings can help in diagnosing the problem when you know what to look for. First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) - Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105PSI  Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s - Ranges from 25-35 PSI - Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25PSI  Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI
Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better!  Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.

With the AC on the coldest setting, use a thermometer in a middle vent. Normal vent temperature readings will vary depending on the (ambient) outside temp. The vent temperature should range from around 42-55 degrees in my experience. If normal gauge readings are obtained and the vent air is cold - STOP don’t overcharge the system. The only proper way to remove refrigerant is with a AC recovery machine so if this is being done at home I can’t emphasize enough not to over charge the system. And actually the best way to insure the proper charge is in a system, is to use an AC machine to recover the freon and then evacuate and recharge the system with the correct amount. Most cars have the specified amount on a decal under the hood. 

Both low and high side readings are lower than normal, this indicates a cars AC system is low on refrigerant and is under-charged.

If both low and high side readings are too high, this indicates an overcharged system - too much refrigerant. This also can indicate that the condenser fan is not working, is too slow or the car is overheating and heat is transferring from the radiator to the condenser.

Good luck and hope this helps, keep me posted be glad to answer any question you may have. 


Jul 02, 2009 | 1998 Honda Prelude

1 Answer

95 Deville - Low Refridgerant/AC Comp. off


To diagnose problems, an A/C manifold gauge set is needed to read high and low side pressure readings. Avoid adding refrigerant with a simple charging kit like the ones sold at parts stores. Don’t add any stop leak, this can cause problems in the compressor, expansion valve or condenser.
Keep in mind that using an A/C gauge set and seeing BOTH high and low side readings can help in diagnosing the problem when you know what to look for. First, on a 134A system the high and low side service ports are different sizes. AC gauge sets have color coded hoses, the blue color coded hose has a connection that fits on the low side service port and the red hose has a connection that will only fit onto the high side. The yellow hose won’t hook up to anything if just checking the readings; it can be used to connect to a vacuum pump or attached to a refrigerant can or tank.

Normal readings on high and low side with AC OFF (static pressure) - Depends on outside temperature, but normally is between 80-105 PSI
Normal low side reading with AC on high speed and MAX & engine at 800-1000 RPM’s - Ranges from 25-35 PSI - Note that on many Chrysler products a normal reading on the low side may be 15-25 PSI
Normal high side reading ranges from 200-350 PSI

Don’t assume that if adding little Freon is good that adding a lot is better!  Overcharging just a little can decrease the performance of the system and possibly damage the compressor.

Both low and high side readings are lower than normal, this indicates a cars AC system is low on refrigerant and is under-charged.
If both low and high side readings are too high, this indicates an overcharged system - too much refrigerant. This also can indicate that the condenser fan is not working, is too slow or the car is overheating and heat is transferring from the radiator to the condenser.

Good luck and hope this helps, keep me posted be glad to answer any question you may have. And yes the A/C system on your car uses R143a and there is a A/C pressure switch along the low pressure line or on the accumulator, it looks like a oil pressure sensor with a two wire lead cliped on it. 

Jul 02, 2009 | 1995 Cadillac DeVille

2 Answers

''does a new radiator need refrigerant added to it''


You need to replace the condensor, then take it to a shop to have the a/c system evacuated and recharged to purge moisture because the system was opened. That will cost around $150. You do not need to replace the receiver/dryer/suction accumulator even though they will tell you that you do.
go to car-part.com to find prices of condensor from salvage yards. Page with asterisk on it is the lowest priced part.

--------------------------------------
The Refrigerant Cycle
During stabilized conditions (air conditioning system shutdown), the refrigerant is in a vaporized state and pressures are equal throughout the system. When the A/C compressor (19703) is in operation it increases pressure on the refrigerant vapor, raising its temperature. The high-pressure and high-temperature vapor is then released into the top of the A/C condenser core (19712).
The A/C condenser core, being close to ambient temperature, causes the refrigerant vapor to condense into a liquid when heat is removed from the refrigerant by ambient air passing over the fins and tubing. The now liquid refrigerant, still at high pressure, exits from the bottom of the A/C condenser core and enters the inlet side of the A/C evaporator core orifice (19D990).
The A/C evaporator core orifice is the restriction in the refrigerant system that creates the high pressure buildup in the A/C evaporator core (19860) and separates the high and low pressure sides of the A/C system. As the liquid refrigerant leaves this restriction, its pressure and boiling point are reduced.
The liquid refrigerant is now at its lowest pressure and temperature. As it passes through the A/C evaporator core, it absorbs heat from the passenger compartment airflow passing over the plate/fin sections of the A/C evaporator core. This addition of heat causes the refrigerant to boil (convert to gas). The now cooler passenger compartment air can no longer support the same humidity level of the warmer air and this excess moisture condenses on the exterior of the evaporator coils and fins and drains outside the vehicle.
The suction accumulator/drier (19C836) is designed to remove moisture from the refrigerant and to prevent any liquid refrigerant that may not have been vaporized in the A/C evaporator core from reaching the A/C compressor. The A/C compressor is designed to pump refrigerant vapor only, as liquid refrigerant will not compress and can damage the A/C compressor.
The refrigerant cycle is now repeated with the A/C compressor again increasing the pressure and temperature of the refrigerant.
The A/C cycling switch (19E561) interrupts compressor operation before the external temperature of the A/C evaporator core gets low enough to cause the condensed water vapor (excess humidity) to turn to ice. It does this by monitoring low side line pressure. It is known that a refrigerant pressure of approximately 210 kPa (30 psi) will yield an operating temperature of 0°C (32°F). The A/C cycling switch controls system operation in an effort to maintain this temperature.
The high side line pressure is also monitored so that A/C compressor operation can be interrupted if system pressure becomes too high.
The A/C compressor pressure relief valve (19D644) will open and vent refrigerant to relieve unusually high system pressure.
Clutch Cycling Orifice Tube Type Refrigerant System 75cc8eb.gif
Item Part Number Description 1 19E762 A/C charge valve port (low side) 2 19E561 A/C cycling switch 3 19C836 Suction accumulator/drier 4 19703 A/C compressor 5 19D644 A/C compressor pressure relief valve 6 19D594 A/C pressure cut-off switch 7 19E762 A/C charge valve port (high side) 8 19712 A/C condenser core 9 19D990 A/C evaporator core orifice 10 19860 A/C evaporator core 11 — Low pressure vapor 12 — High pressure vapor 13 — Low pressure liquid 14 — High pressure liquid

  1. Connect the R-134a A/C Refrigerant Center to the low- and high-pressure service gauge port valves.
  2. Evacuate the system until the low-pressure gauge reads at least 99.4 kPa (29.5 in-Hg) (vacuum) and as close as 101.1 kPa (30 in-Hg) as possible. Continue to operate the vacuum pump for a minimum of 45 minutes.
  3. Turn off the evacuation pump. Observe the low-pressure gauge for five minutes to make sure that the system vacuum is held. If vacuum is not held for five minutes, leak-test the system, service the leaks, and evacuate the system again.
  4. Correctly oil match the system to verify that the correct amount of refrigerant oil is present in the system. For additional information, refer to Refrigerant Oil Adding in this section.
  5. Charge the system with the specified weight of refrigerant and refrigerant oil.
  6. When no more refrigerant is being drawn into the system, start the engine and select MAX A/C operation. Set the blower motor speed to maximum and allow the remaining refrigerant to be drawn into the system. Continue to add refrigerant into the system until the specified weight of R-134a has been added. Close the charging cylinder valve and allow the system to pull any remaining refrigerant from the hose. When the suction pressure drops to approximately 207 kPa (30 psi), close the charging hose valve.

May 14, 2009 | 1995 Nissan Maxima

1 Answer

A/C pump cycles ever second or two.


Follow the big hose/line this is the low pressure/suction side and the service port will be on this side of the system. May be on the receiver/drier or on the back of the compressor. Sorry I cant remember an exact location.

Mar 31, 2009 | 2006 GMC Sierra 1500HD

Not finding what you are looking for?
1992 Toyota Land Cruiser Logo

Related Topics:

241 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Toyota Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

60769 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

21949 Answers

Jeff Turcotte
Jeff Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

6811 Answers

Are you a Toyota Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...