Question about 1988 Chevrolet Celebrity

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Getting gas but no spark;

Ecm is producing 12.5v; ignition module and primary and secondary resistance check ok. crank sensor checks ok, even tried a new sensor for the heck of it but car still won't start. Checked multiple plugs, no spark. I did have a power steering fluid leak that did get the crank sensor and harness wet (saturated) but looks ok. Not sure though. HELP!!!!

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  • metal-mania Sep 30, 2008

    I should have mentioned that the car has a 2.8 v6 w/ a DIS ignition system. It is a distributorless ignition. Any solutions for this system???

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If your are sure that the ignition module and coil are good,then check your pick-up coil.It is inside the distributor cap,close to the module.The ECM does not produce the voltage to the coil.The voltage comes from the a fused 12v source.

Posted on Sep 29, 2008

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98 mercury villager no start , code P 1320


Here is the entire description for the code -

When is the code detected?When the ignition signal in the primary circuit is not sent to Engine Control Module (ECM) during engine cranking or running.

Symptoms- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)

P1320 NISSAN Description The ignition signal from the Engine Control Module (ECM) is sent to and amplified by the power transistor. The power transistor turns on and off the ignition coil primary circuit. This on-off operation induces the proper high voltage in the coil secondary circuit
Possible causes - Faulty power transistor unit built into ignition coil
- Ignition primary circuit is open or shorted (circuit to ignition coils)
- Ignition primary circuit poor electrical connection (circuit to ignition coils)
- Faulty ignition system condenser
- Crankshaft position sensor circuit

help.png Help with this Tech notes The most common cause that will trigger the P1320 code is the ignition coils, one or more ignition coils may have failed. Even tough the coils may be working OK, the resistance for one or more of the coils is greater or smaller that what the Engine Control Module (ECM) is expecting. Measuring the resistance with the coil out of the vehicle may not show any failures, usually the coil fails under heavy conditions (hard acceleration) or certain temperatures.

The P1320 code means that there is problem with the "Ignition Coil" or the wire to the ignition coil. For some models without individual ignition coils the Ignition Coil is inside the distributor and the distributor need to be replaced to fix the problem.
Read more: http://engine-codes.com/p1320_nissan.html#ixzz2EJsrz4BZ

Read more: http://engine-codes.com/p1320_nissan.html#ixzz2EJsktmXX

Dec 06, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2005 grand am wont start


see this steps and fix it. God bless you
When the engine cranks normally but won't start, you need to check ignition, fuel and compression. Ignition is easy enough to check with a spark tester or by positioning a plug wire near a good ground. No spark? The most likely causes would be a failed ignition module, distributor pickup or cranshaft position sensor CKP

A tool such as an Ignition System Simulator can speed the diagnosis by quickly telling you if the ignition module and coil are capable of producing a spark with a simulated timing input signal. If the simulated signal generates a spark, the problem is a bad distributor pickup or crankshaft position sensor. No spark would point to a bad module or coil. Measuring ignition coil primary and secondary resistance can rule out that component as the culprit.
Module problems as well as pickup problems are often caused by loose, broken or corroded wiring terminals and connectors. Older GM HEI ignition modules are notorious for this. If you are working on a distributorless ignition system with a Hall effect crankshaft position sensor, check the sensor's reference voltage (VRef) and ground. The sensor must have 5 volts or it will remain permanently off and not generate a crank signal (which should set a fault code). Measure VRef between the sensor power supply wire and ground (use the engine block for a ground, not the sensor ground circuit wire). Don't see 5 volts? Then check the sensor wiring harness for loose or corroded connectors. A poor ground connection will have the same effect on the sensor operation as a bad VRef supply. Measure the voltage drop between the sensor ground wire and the engine block. More than a 0.1 voltage drop indicates a bad ground connection. Check the sensor mounting and wiring harness.
If a Hall effect crank sensor has power and ground, the next thing to check would be its output. With nothing in the sensor window, the sensor should be "on" and read 5 volts (VRef). Measure the sensor D.C. output voltage between the sensor signal output wire and ground (use the engine block again, not the ground wire). When the engine is cranked, the sensor output should drop to zero every time the shutter blade, notch, magnetic button or gear tooth passes through the sensor. No change in voltage would indicate a bad sensor that needs to be replaced.
If the primary side of the ignition system seems to be producing a trigger signal for the coil but the voltage is not reaching the plugs, a visual inspection of the coil tower, distributor cap, rotor and plug wires should be made to identify any defects that might be preventing the spark from reaching its intended destination.


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Oct 16, 2012 | 2005 Pontiac Grand Am

2 Answers

I have no spark any reason that comes to mind?


possible distributor. most of the time spark is produced by distributor

Mar 25, 2011 | 1992 Honda Accord

1 Answer

Car cranks but wont start


ENGINE CRANKS BUT WILL NOT START
When the engine cranks normally but won't start, you need to check ignition, fuel and"http://www.aa1car.com/library/compression.htm". Ignition is easy enough to check with a spark tester or by positioning a plug wire near a good ground. No spark? The most likely causes would be a failed ignition module, distributor pickup or "http://www.aa1car.com/library/crank_sensors.htm".
A tool such as an Ignition System Simulator can speed the diagnosis by quickly telling you if the ignition module and coil are capable of producing a spark with a simulated timing input signal. If the simulated signal generates a spark, the problem is a bad distributor pickup or crankshaft position sensor. No spark would point to a bad module or coil. Measuring ignition coil primary and secondary resistance can rule out that component as the culprit.
Module problems as well as pickup problems are often caused by loose, broken or corroded wiring terminals and connectors. Older HEI ignition modules are notorious for this. If you are working on a distributorless ignition system with a Hall effect crankshaft position sensor, check the sensor's reference voltage (VRef) and ground. The sensor must have 5 volts or it will remain permanently off and not generate a crank signal (which should set a fault code). Measure VRef between the sensor power supply wire and ground (use the engine block for a ground, not the sensor ground circuit wire). Don't see 5 volts? Then check the sensor wiring harness for loose or corroded connectors. A poor ground connection will have the same effect on the sensor operation as a bad VRef supply. Measure the voltage drop between the sensor ground wire and the engine block. More than a 0.1 voltage drop indicates a bad ground connection. Check the sensor mounting and wiring harness.
If a Hall effect crank sensor has power and ground, the next thing to check would be its output. With nothing in the sensor window, the sensor should be "on" and read 5 volts (VRef). Measure the sensor D.C. output voltage between the sensor signal output wire and ground (use the engine block again, not the ground wire). When the engine is cranked, the sensor output should drop to zero every time the shutter blade, notch, magnetic button or gear tooth passes through the sensor. No change in voltage would indicate a bad sensor that needs to be replaced.
If the primary side of the ignition system seems to be producing a trigger signal for the coil but the voltage is not reaching the plugs, a visual inspection of the coil tower, distributor cap, rotor and plug wires should be made to identify any defects that might be preventing the spark from reaching its intended destination.----
thanks for using fixya,please do rate the solution positively.

Feb 17, 2010 | 1996 Acura RL

1 Answer

Engine turns over, won't start, no fire at plugs. There's plenty of fuel, and no fire from any of the plugs. All fuses and fusible links are good. I pulled the plugs to check for a spark, and there's no...


What are you wondering is correct. Let check the coil first. if coil is good the there is a problem with the ignition module. If the ignition module is good then a problem with the crankshaft sensor. The coil can be checked by measure resistance of the terminals of the primary coil and secondary coil separately to see if it open. To check if it can generate a spark, once you identify the primary coil terminal, run 12 V wire to these terminal, connect a spark plug to the secondary coil, by just leaving a spark plug with connected with spark plug wire and let it touch the engine chassis. Now you have to make pulses at the 12 volts connection by making a break and connection several time to turn it on and off to generate the spark at spark plug. The ignition module is supposed to do what you are doing now to generate the spark. If it is bad, it can't do what you did then a spark is not generated. For the crankshaft sensor, only the shop can tell you it is bad or not. Good luck.

Nov 14, 2009 | 1995 Honda Civic

2 Answers

I have no spark.. have replaced crank sensor, computer, coil pack.... cranks over fine just no fire.... also injectors are pulsing with key in on posistion


The coil is good after you check resistance from primary and secondary terminals, but it won't generate spark if there is not pulsing at the primary terminals. You can generate sparks by connecting at the primary coil to 12 volts from the battery. Connect the secondary terminal to a spark plug. Now the primary connection has to make pulses on off continuously (either positive or negative ) to generate the spark from the secondary terminal (now is at the spark plug). If you have spark here then the problem is the ignition module. It is a electronic device to perform the function as you just did to generate the spark. Good luck.

Nov 10, 2009 | 1992 Oldsmobile Silhouette

1 Answer

The car will crank but does not have fire going to the coil pack


did you do a spark test?
This could be a number of things, your crankshaft sensor, coils or ignition module.
check the coils
  1. Remove the ignition coil(s).
  2. Using an ohmmeter, check the resistance between the primary terminals on the underside of the coil. The resistance should be 0.50-0.90 ohms.
  3. Check the resistance between the secondary terminals. It should be 5,000-10,000 ohms.
  4. If the coil failed either test, replace the coil.

Jul 25, 2009 | 1995 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

Hi, 94 seville, no spark, how do I check crank and cam sensors? coil pack? ignition control module? I am trying to determine why no spark. Any help in explaining how to check these items would be great....


Crank engine with distributor cap removed, is it turning?
(That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one)is it turning?
Broken timing belt or chain?

Are you getting power to the + positive side of the coil (small wires) with key on ? Hint; I use a needle pushed into the back of the plug so as not to damage the wiring.
If you have power then wiring from the ignition switch is OK. It usually is.
Hook your test light to the - negative side of the coil (one end on the - terminal and the other end on a ground). You should have power on the - side of the coil with the key on and engine off.
Crank the engine while watching the test light. Get a flashing signal at the test light when cranking?
If so and you have no spark the coil is likely dead.(don’t rely merely on resistance tests for a coil, a weak coil can test ok for resistance but still give no spark.It happens but is unusual. I learned this the hard way!)
No flashing signal?
Check continuity in all primary circuit wiring for opens.
If they are good,
It is time to check the pulse generator in the distributor. (That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one, if it doesn’t then the ECM or computer sends signal via the crankshaft position sensor and the camshaft position sensor)
With the engine in non-running condition connect your A/C voltmeter to the pair of wires at the pulse generator and crank the engine. You are looking for an A/C signal that makes 4-6 volts of A/C. Got this? If so the ignition module is dead or has a bad ground. If not (more likely) you have a dead pulse generator in the distributor.
If you have three wires in the distributor signal wire you have a Hall effect sensor. I forget how to test that one. (Chrysler stuff)


If this part of the primary ignition tests ok then check wiring to ECM pinouts for opens.Wiring tests ok.ECM as last resort.
Hope this helps...........

Jun 27, 2009 | 1995 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

97 saturn sl1 drove in fine, won't start just crank. no spark


Crank engine with distributor cap removed, is it turning?
(That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one)is it turning?
Broken timing belt or chain?

Are you getting power to the + positive side of the coil (small wires) with key on ? Hint; I use a needle pushed into the back of the plug so as not to damage the wiring.
If you have power then wiring from the ignition switch is OK. It usually is.
Hook your test light to the - negative side of the coil (one end on the - terminal and the other end on a ground). You should have power on the - side of the coil with the key on and engine off.
Crank the engine while watching the test light. Get a flashing signal at the test light when cranking?
If so and you have no spark the coil is likely dead.(don’t rely merely on resistance tests for a coil, a weak coil can test ok for resistance but still give no spark.It happens but is unusual. I learned this the hard way!)
No flashing signal?
Check continuity in all primary circuit wiring for opens.
If they are good,
It is time to check the pulse generator in the distributor. (That is if it has a distributor cap, some newer cars don’t have one, if it doesn’t then the ECM or computer sends signal via the crankshaft position sensor and the camshaft position sensor)
With the engine in non-running condition connect your A/C voltmeter to the pair of wires at the pulse generator and crank the engine. You are looking for an A/C signal that makes 4-6 volts of A/C. Got this? If so the ignition module is dead or has a bad ground. If not (more likely) you have a dead pulse generator in the distributor.
If you have three wires in the distributor signal wire you have a Hall effect sensor. I forget how to test that one. (Chrysler stuff)


If this part of the primary ignition tests ok then check wiring to ECM pinouts for opens.Wiring tests ok.ECM as last resort.
Hope this helps...........

Jan 12, 2009 | 1997 Saturn SL

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