Question about Hyundai Motor 2002 Sonata

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No spark P0385 code

Hi my 2002 sonata cranks over but no spark i get this error code P0385 for crankshaft position sensor circuit malfuntion any help on checking this circuit or with problem is great help.
thanks

Posted by on

5 Suggested Answers

  • 94 Answers

SOURCE: need to change crankshaft position sensor for 2001 elantra

down by your crank shaft pulley you will find a sensor with 2 wires ruining into it and 1 bolt holding the sensor in remove the bolt and twist and pull on the sensor then slide the new sensor in then reinstall bolt and wire

Posted on Mar 08, 2009

michigan man
  • 3533 Answers

SOURCE: replacing output speed sensor on 2002 sonata

try autozone.com to see if they have your car listed for diagrams pictures and step by step instructions if your car is not listed then try your local library they have all the car manuals and even copy them for you

Posted on Mar 20, 2009

alicantecoli
  • 21981 Answers

SOURCE: crank sensor location on Hyundai Sonata 2003 model

look carefully on bellhousing and rocker cover/head it has to be somewhere

Posted on Apr 03, 2009

  • 225 Answers

SOURCE: 1999 hyundai sonata misfires after replacing crank

if you changed the timing belt and balancer belt. you may be 1 tooth off. will miss like a champ if the belt was changed

Posted on Aug 07, 2009

ghost45
  • 1280 Answers

SOURCE: I have a 2000 hyundai Sonata, 6 cylinder eng. My

The sensor is located on the left hand rear side of the block (near the bell housing). It is held in place by a 10mm bolt. It's to the right of the exhaust manifold (LH - radiator side) on the V6. Once you purchase the new sensor you'll be able to identify it on the engine. The connector to this sensor is located in the illustration.
2cb09a4.jpg A word to the wise... replace the O2 snsr as well.

Posted on Oct 04, 2009

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Crank and cam sensor replaced . cars starts and run but still reads code 335 . cranksensor circuit malfunction. and idea whats the issue why this code is still coming up.?


the sensor may be good its the circuit code which means can be a wiring /connection problem not just the sensor the following link is courtesy of obd-codes.comP0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction OBD-II Trouble Code Technical Description Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction What does that mean? The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set. Symptoms NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include: Vehicle may not start (see above) Vehicle may run rough or misfire MIL illumination Causes A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by: Damaged CKP sensor connector Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway) Sensor output open Sensor output shorted to ground Sensor output shorted to voltage Failed crank sensor Broken timing belt Failed PCM Possible Solutions Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs? If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay? If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault. This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0335
Copyright OBD-Codes.com
http://www.obd-codes.com/p0335

Aug 19, 2015 | 2005 Chevrolet Impala

2 Answers

Tying to find crank sensor for 2002 Cadillac Seville std 4.6 liter


This answer covers 1999-2005 Cadillac Deville, Eldorado & Seville.
Example Engine:
2002 Cadillac Seville STS 4.6L SFI DOHC HO 8cyl.

This engine has (2) Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensors: the Upper sensor is CKP sensor B, and the lower sensor is CKP sensor A (this is included for the OBD-II DTC codes - P0385 references Sensor B = upper CKP sensor, whereas P0335 references the lower CKP sensor (sensor A)).

Both crankshaft position sensors are located in the front of the engine just above the oil filter adapter. To access both CKP sensors, jack up vehicle on the passenger side, remove the oil filter, and the oil filter adapter, including the Engine Oil Pressure (EOP) switch. See illustration.
tying-find-crank-sensor-2002-cadillac-3hcuyyaerdphtgzyedxwn2k0-1-0.jpg
The ARROW points toward Front of Car.
1. Upper Crankshaft Position Sensor (B).
2. Lower Crankshaft Position Sensor (A)
3. Engine Oil Pressure (EOP) switch
4. Engine Oil Level switch
The Oil Filter is the can-type object below the oil filter adapter, which includes the EOP switch. Recommend: remove oil filter with an oil filter socket/strap wrench, since it's close to the oil pan.

Aug 21, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Codes 441 and 335 on my hyundai elantra 2002


Hi there:DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:Damaged CKP sensor connectorDamaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)Sensor output openSensor output shorted to groundSensor output shorted to voltageFailed crank sensorBroken timing beltFailed PCM

Possible Solutions:Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

DTC P0441 - Evaporative Emission Control System Incorrect Purge FlowThis indicates that a part of the EVAP control system is no longer fuctioning correctly. The EVAP system consists of many parts, including (but not limited to) the gas cap, fuel lines, carbon canister, purge valve, and other hoses. The (EVAP) emission control system prevents the escape of fuel vapors from a vehicle's fuel system. Fuel vapors are routed by hoses to a charcoal canister for storage. Later, when the engine is running a purge control valve opens allowing intake vacuum to siphon the fuel vapors into the engine.

EVAP emission canister purge is contolled by a valve which allows engine vacuum to pull stored fuel vapors from fuel tank into the engine to be burned, rather than be vented to atmosphere. A vacuum switch is used to detect when flow exists. If the PCM commands purge and sees that the switch is closed (indicating no detected purge flow) P0441 is set.

A code P0441 could mean one or more of the following has happened:Bad vacuum switchBroken or damaged EVAP line or canisterOpen in PCM purge command circuitOpen or short in Voltage feed circuit to Purge SolenoidFaulty purge solenoidRestriction in EVAP solenoid, line or canisterCorrosion or resistance in purge connectorBad PCM

Possible Solutions:With a P0441 OBD-II trouble code, diagnosis can be tricky at times. Here are some things to try:
Common Chrysler fix - Replace Leak Detection Pump / LDPRepair damaged EVAP lines or canisterRepair open or short in voltage feed circuit to Purge SolenoidRepair open in PCM purge command circuitReplace purge SolenoidReplace vacuum switchRepair restriction in Evap line or canister or soleniodRepair resistance in purge connectorReplace PCM

Hope this helps.

Mar 28, 2012 | Hyundai Motor 2002 Elantra

2 Answers

Chysler 300 code po335


Hi there:
DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions: using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Feb 27, 2012 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

What problems will code po335 cause


Hi there:
DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions: using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day

Feb 23, 2012 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

2005 CHYSLER CODE PO335 WHAT IS IT


Hi there:
DTC P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Broken timing belt
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions: using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Feb 23, 2012 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

It show code po385


P0385 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0385 will set.

Symptoms:

NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:

Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

Causes: A P0385 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
* Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
* If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank Sensor Bnd connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the Sensor Bnd measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
* If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
* If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank Sensor Bnd re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0335. This code P0385 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "B", whereas P0335 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "A". If you have the code P0385, your vehicle is equipped with two crank sensors (CPS). Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope this helps (remember to rate this answer).

Jun 07, 2011 | 2001 Oldsmobile Intrigue

2 Answers

1997 villeager mercury van engine code po385, and po400


P0400 - Exhaust Gas Recirculation Flow Malfunction
The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve is vacuum controlled valve that regulates the amount of exhaust gases that re-enter the cylinders. The powertrain control module (PCM) determines how much based on engine load, temp, and other conditions. If the PCM detects that the amount of exhaust gases entering the cylinder were insufficient or non-existent, this code is set.

Symptoms: No symptoms will likely be noticed by the driver other than the MIL (malfunction indicator lamp). However, non visible symptoms will be increased combustion temperature and increased Nox emissions.

Causes: A code P0400 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
Plugged EGR passage which restricts the flow of exhaust gasses
Faulty EGR solenoid
Faulty EGR solenoid wiring/harness
Vacuum lines damaged/disconnected to the EGR valve solenoid or to the EGR valve
Faulty EGR valve

Possible Solutions: Since EGR valve designs are different, no one test will suffice:
Using a scan tool, operate the EGR valve with the engine running. If the engine stumbles, the problem was likely intermittent wiring problem or intermittent blockage problem
If engine doesn't stumble, operate the EGR valve manually, if possible. If engine doesn't stumble and die, the ports are likely plugged. Removal of valve and cleaning of all ports will be required
Checking of solenoid can only usually be done with a scan tool, because most solenoids operate with a duty cycle of voltage, rather than constant voltage
Check all vacuum lines, hoses, etc for any damage
Visually inspect the solenoid harness and the solenoid for damage
Replace EGR valve



P0385 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0385 will set.

Symptoms:
NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:

Vehicle may not start (see above)
Vehicle may run rough or misfire
MIL illumination

Causes: A P0385 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
Damaged CKP sensor connector
Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
Sensor output open
Sensor output shorted to ground
Sensor output shorted to voltage
Failed crank sensor
Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank Sensor Bnd connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the Sensor Bnd measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank Sensor Bnd re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0335. This code P0385 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "B", whereas P0335 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "A". If you have the code P0385, your vehicle is equipped with two crank sensors (CPS). Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.


Hope this helps.

May 13, 2011 | 1997 Mercury Villager

1 Answer

Hi have 2001 chevy s1o pick up have engine light on with code po335 crank sensor circuit problem had sensor and pig tail connector replaced still have same problem around 2500 rpm engine brakes up engine...


P0335 - Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction

The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0335 will set.

Symptoms:
NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
* Vehicle may not start (see above)
* Vehicle may run rough or misfire
* MIL illumination

Causes: A P0335 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
* Damaged CKP sensor connector
* Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
* Sensor output open
* Sensor output shorted to ground
* Sensor output shorted to voltage
* Failed crank sensor
* Broken timing belt
* Failed PCM

Possible Solutions:
1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0385. This code P0335 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "A", whereas P0385 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "B". Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Test it and keep us updated.

Feb 05, 2011 | 2001 Chevrolet S-10

1 Answer

What does code 385 mean


P0385 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction

What does that mean?
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) measures crankshaft location and relays this information to the PCM (Powertrain Control Module). Depending on the vehicle, the PCM uses this crankshaft position information to time the spark properly or on some systems it is only for misfire detection and does not control spark timing. The CKP sensor is stationary and works in harmony with a reluctor ring (or toothed ring) that is attached to the crankshaft. As this reluctor ring passes in front of the CKP sensor, the magnetic field created by the CKP sensor is interrupted and this creates a square wave voltage signal that the PCM interprets as crankshaft position. If the PCM detects that there are no crankshaft pulses or if it sees a problem with the pulses on the output circuit, P0385 will set.

Symptoms
NOTE: If the crank sensor is used only for misfire detection and NOT spark timing (this varies with the vehicle), the vehicle should start and run with MIL (Malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. Also, some vehicles require several key cycles to illuminate the MIL. If this is the case, there may be no MIL illumination until the problem often enough over time. If the crank sensor is used for BOTH misfire detection and spark timing, the vehicle may or may not start. Symptoms may include:
* Vehicle may not start (see above)
* Vehicle may run rough or misfire
* MIL illumination

Causes
A P0385 "check engine light" code could be caused by:
* Damaged CKP sensor connector
* Damaged reluctor ring (missing teeth or not turning due to sheared-off keyway)
* Sensor output open
* Sensor output shorted to ground
* Sensor output shorted to voltage
* Failed crank sensor
* Failed PCM

Possible Solutions
1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank Sensor Bnd connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the Sensor Bnd measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank Sensor Bnd re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

This code is basically identical to P0335. This code P0385 refers to Crankshaft Posistion Sensor "B", whereas P0335 refers to Crankshaft Position Sensor "A". If you have the code P0385, your vehicle is equipped with two crank sensors (CPS). Other crank sensor codes include P0016, P0017, P0018, P0019, P0335, P0336, P0337, P0338, P0339, P0385, P0386, P0387, P0388, and P0389.

Hope helps (remember rated this).

Jun 14, 2010 | 1995 Ford Taurus

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